Any advice for a newbie cyclist taking on a duatholon

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by This Time Next Year, 14 Feb 2018.

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  1. This Time Next Year

    This Time Next Year Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Portsmouth, UK
    (Apologies if this is in the wrong forum.)
    I've entered a duathlon the other day which is now less than two weeks away.

    It's only a very short one (5k run / 15k cycle / 5k run), and even though my newly acquired dadbod has meant my fitness isn't where it once was, I'm an experienced runner (7 marathons under my belt) so confident with the run sections, but an absolute novice cyclist.

    I have a road bike (Boardman Team Carbon) which I bought a couple of summers ago on the C2W scheme, but have almost certainly done less than 50 miles on it. - (Deciding to sell the house the week I bought it meant any initial enthusiasm I had didn't get a chance to bloom, and fatherhood since has left me without the time, or energy, to cycle as well as run).

    I'm aware of the second run jelly legs, having experienced them myself during a 3k/8k/3k mini brick session, but I'm less aware of how to combat them. I have flat 'standard' pedals fitted and was planning on wearing some harder soled semi off road running shoes throughout.

    I'm aware the main advice is just turn up and enjoy it and finish (which will of course be my primary aim, but if there's any little bits of advice that will make everything go smoother I'd love to hear it.

    Questions I have thought of so far...
    What should I wear?
    How should I set up the bike? (I assume remove mud guards, saddle bag etc?)
    What maintenance should I do given it's been sat in the garage relatively unused?
    What tips do you have?
    Should I invest in clip-less pedals?
    -Will they really make any difference?
     
  2. Sharky

    Sharky Veteran

    Location:
    Kent
    With just 2 weeks to go, your fitness isn't going to change much and as you know what to expect on the running side, I would just try and get in two or three 40 minute sessions on the bike. Just pump the tyres up and remove anything that you don't need and get out there. Regards clothing, in Feb, it's still cold and close fitting and warm cloths are vital and if possible keep your legs and arms covered. Not a runner, so don't know if this is incompatible with the running sections.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    This Time Next Year

    This Time Next Year Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Portsmouth, UK
    I have a pair of tri shorts that I bought as I was eyeing up duathalons a while ago, presumably I could throw some running tights over the top of these to keep the bottom half of the legs covered? As for top half I was thinking long sleeved baselayer, with running gloves (which I hope will keep the cold off my fingers enough), and possibly a tight fitting running top/vest over the top.

    The whole event is very flat, but could be exposed to some strong winds coming off the sea depending on weather.

    Normally for running 5/10k I'd be in just shorts, and possibly a short sleeved baselayer under the club vest. I guess it's about finding a balance for the two sections.

    Will try and get out on the bike at the weekend to give it a go and see how it feels.
     
    Sharky likes this.
  4. OP
    OP
    This Time Next Year

    This Time Next Year Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Portsmouth, UK
    What do you mean by "Slip in toe clips"? Do you have a link to something so I can see what you mean?

    I never really got on with the standard strap your feet into the pedal contraptions, couldn't see how you could get your feet out when stopping with those. Are these some sort of half way house?
     
  5. OP
    OP
    This Time Next Year

    This Time Next Year Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Portsmouth, UK
    A quick google suggest I may have been using toe clips wrong previously, presumably you're not meant to do the straps up so tight that you can't get your foot out? :laugh:
     
    Alan O likes this.
  6. boydj

    boydj Veteran

    Location:
    Paisley
    When you are in the last mile or so of the cycle, push a lighter gear with a relatively fast cadence to help get your legs prepared for the run. Practice the cycle to run transition a few times to get used to switching on the running muscles quickly. I always found it hard to get into a good rhythm on the final run leg if I'd been pushing hard on the bike.

    I'd concentrate on getting as much time on the bike as possible, because the good cyclists will make up more time on the bike than anybody could pull back on the run.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    This Time Next Year

    This Time Next Year Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Portsmouth, UK
    Thanks, at £3ish on amazon I've ordered a set of those rigid clips, if I don't get on with them I figure it's such a small cost I've not really lost out on anything.
     
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