Any of you machine or hand washed 'dry clean only' clothes?

OP
Accy cyclist

Accy cyclist

Legendary Member
For those who've been wondering how they (both pairs) turned out:okay: ,they were fine after being washed. No shrinkage at all and softer due to the fabric conditioner. So there you go. You can wash some dry clean recommended clothing,just as long as you keep the water cool,use a wool friendly liquid,don't hammer them in the spinner and let them air dry.:okay:
 
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slowmotion

Quite dreadful
Location
lost somewhere
For those who've been wondering how they turned out :okay:,they were fine after being washed. No shrinkage at all and softer due to the fabric conditioner. So there you go. You can wash some dry clean recommended clothing,just as long as you keep the water cool,use a wool friendly liquid,don't hammer them in the spinner and let them air dry.:okay:
Good stuff Accy. Well done!
 
Location
London
But why use wooden tongs? Surely you can grab more garments with your hands? Maybe the washing powder in those days was so harsh on skin that they had to avoid contact with the stuff?🤔
Don't know, it's just what i remember - reference upthread to them as well I think. Maybe only the deluxe models came with tongs. I do remember that the machine jumped around a fair bit.
 

Bazzer

Setting the controls for the heart of the sun.
But why use wooden tongs? Surely you can grab more garments with your hands? Maybe the washing powder in those days was so harsh on skin that they had to avoid contact with the stuff?🤔
Probably a carry over from the days of the dolly tub or public washing facilities, where the water temperature could be, as I recall, almost scalding.
Also, again from memory, early twin tubs had limited temperature control. My parents' first washing machine, a Rolls Razor, could get very hot.
 
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A bit late to the party but.... Yes!

When I was first married, as a dutiful husband I shared the laundry. Little did I know that the time honoured tradition of separating normal wash clothes (won't go into coloured vs whites, I just assume everyone knows that) from dry cleaning clothes wasn't something my new bride did, and I didn't even think anyone would not even think of not doing that.

So unbeknownst, I promptly put a load of coloured clothes into the washing machine, as well as three professional suits my wife owned.

Anyway, I've not done laundry in 30 years.
 

swee'pea99

Legendary Member
A bit late to the party but.... Yes!

When I was first married, as a dutiful husband I shared the laundry. Little did I know that the time honoured tradition of separating normal wash clothes (won't go into coloured vs whites, I just assume everyone knows that) from dry cleaning clothes wasn't something my new bride did, and I didn't even think anyone would not even think of not doing that.

So unbeknownst, I promptly put a load of coloured clothes into the washing machine, as well as three professional suits my wife owned.

Anyway, I've not done laundry in 30 years.
Worked then.
 
OP
Accy cyclist

Accy cyclist

Legendary Member
I've been looking through my clothes drawers to see what 'dry clean only' or wool items i can experiment with next.
I have a few wool/tweed,or part wool/tweed flat caps i'd like to wash. I wouldn't spin them though,as the spin would probably knacker the peak/brim. Best to just let them drip dry,as i do with baseball caps i've washed.
 
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Dry cleaning isn't dry cleaning. A dry cleaners uses a big washing machine but with more solvents instead of water and less detergent. So in a dry cleaners everything still gets wet, just like when you wash it.
 
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