Best MTB Under £1000

Lovacott

Senior Member
Hi folks,

I am looking to buy a new MTB for my daily commute and my main criteria are sturdiness, clean gear changes, good tyres and quick stopping.

I'm not fussed about looks or brand name.

I want something which is well built and won't let me down in the middle of nowhere.

I am pretty diligent when it comes to regular servicing so I'm not looking for a bike which looks after itself.

My current bike is a 6 year old Halfords Apollo MTB which cost £120 new so most suggestions will be an improvement on what I currently have.

Any thoughts?
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Is your commute off road?
Single, double or triple chainring?
 
A modern MTB will have suspension and expensive consumables. They're the kinds of things that don't really suit a commuting bike, especially over the roads you've described in other posts, in my opinion. It'll also be more attractive to thieves.

What is it exactly that you want to change/improve on your current bike? When that's answered a new bike will become clearer.

If I'm remembering correctly this will be your first winter commuting? If so, it might be an idea to get through it first, see what the winter season throws at you and have more info for buying a new bike.

Sorry, I'm biased towards old MTBs. Cheap to run and they'll go anywhere😊
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
good tyres
Commuting on knobblies makes no sense unless you have to for terrain reasons.

Most lack puncture resistance and wear quickly on hard surfaces.

The good news is there are plenty of shallow tread road orientated tyres for MTBs which will turn the bike into a reasonable commuter.
 
Location
London
Commuting on knobblies makes no sense unless you have to for terrain reasons.

Most lack puncture resistance and wear quickly on hard surfaces.

The good news is there are plenty of shallow tread road orientated tyres for MTBs which will turn the bike into a reasonable commuter.
I thought slicker tyres were supposed to be becoming rarer for 26inch wheel bikes with a certain move away from 26 inch.

Only wot I've heard - I have a 26 inch wheel exped bike and hoping I'll be OK as I don't use anything slick on it.

Re the original question I too wonder if the OP needs an MTB for this commute - more info needed.

If an MTB is needed, I would be inclined to go for a good condition second hand rigid one.
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
Any road, hybrid, gravel or touring bike will be sturdy, give clean gear changes, have good ( puncture proof) tyres and be able to stop quickly and safely although disc brakes will provide the same but in all weathers. They should all do a better job on a commute than a heavy MTB with knobbly tyres but you've already had some experience on the Apollo (sorry about that) so any of the above will give you a way better and more efficient mount but if you want to stick with a mountain bike don't let me dissuade you if that's what you prefer.
I should try some options and then decide.
 
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Lovacott

Lovacott

Senior Member
Is your commute off road?
Single, double or triple chainring?
My commute is on country lanes and farm tracks. I'm going to buy a road bike next year for weekend rides but I'm pretty certain that a road bike wouldn't be the best choice for the daily commute.

My current setup is a 21 speed (3 on the front 7 on the back).
 
OP
Lovacott

Lovacott

Senior Member
Commuting on knobblies makes no sense unless you have to for terrain reasons.
The roads are all tarmac covered but some sections are really muddy. I'm not actually riding along along dirt trails. I'm not sure which tyre is best for my commute?

This is from my cam a couple of weeks back.

mud.JPG
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
The roads are all tarmac covered but some sections are really muddy. I'm not actually riding along along dirt trails. I'm not sure which tyre is best for my commute?

This is from my cam a couple of weeks back.

View attachment 555638
Mmn, I can see why you are thinking about knobblies.

You will certainly need some tread to ride on that.

Best plan might be to wear out what the bike comes with, then fit Marathon Plus MTB tyres, which are about the most puncture resistant and long lasting MTB tyre available.

https://www.schwalbe.com/en/tour-reader/marathon-plus-mtb
 
OP
Lovacott

Lovacott

Senior Member
CX bikes are certainly designed to deal with mud and you can add slicks for better use on roads in summer. I personally wouldn’t want suspension for that
Suspension is the sticking point for me (do I need it or not)?

The roads are bumpy but they are not exactly mountain tracks.

I'm pretty certain that I could dispense with suspension forks.
 
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