Buying a frame

Discussion in 'Bicycle Mechanics and Repairs' started by redcard, 16 Aug 2012.

  1. redcard

    redcard Über Member

    Location:
    Paisley
    Simple question: How easy is it to transplant all the components on my current road bike onto a nice new frame?
     
  2. Very easy IMO. Just remember that not all seatposts are the same diameter, and front mechs have different fittings too. Other than that it's straight forward, and also rewarding to do :thumbsup:
     
  3. sittingbull

    sittingbull Über Member

    Location:
    South Liverpool
    Would the bottom bracket length be correct? (I'm thinking about the chain-line).
     
  4. OP
    OP
    redcard

    redcard Über Member

    Location:
    Paisley
    You guys are making this sound a bit too complicated.:stop:

    There must be someone out there who did this and everything went without a hitch.
     
  5. MacB

    MacB Lover of things that come in 3's

    it's pretty straight forward and can be very rewarding and instructional if you've not done it before or often.

    As others say you need to be aware of the sizes of key parts and that they may not all transplant. Other than that it's just a question of the right tools really. A lot of them can be bodged but it is a huge amount easier if you've got the kit for the job. If you anticipate tinkering a lot then buy the tools, of a reasonable standard, as you need them. Otherwise maybe you could find a nice neighbour who has them or a friendly bike shop that allows loansies.
     
  6. It's not complicated, trust me, I've done it so it can't be :tongue:

    I've re-built two '80's bikes, converting one to modern 10 speed, and built up a new frame as well.

    The last frame I built I just had to get a new seatpost as the one I had was too wide, and I had to get a braze on front mech as opposed to the clamp on one that was fitted to my old bike.

    What bike is it you've got, and what frame are you looking at building up?
     
  7. OP
    OP
    redcard

    redcard Über Member

    Location:
    Paisley
    Nothing in particular. I probably should learn the basics of bike maintenance first before taking on such a project.
     
  8. Or, use the project as the perfect way to learn the basics of bike maintenance.

    Remember also that CycleChat and YouTube are your best friends when undertaking any maintenance. CC for the advice, and YouTube for the practical vids like THIS and THIS :thumbsup:
     
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