Changing bike chain

Anton

Senior Member
Hi,
I am after some advice for changing my bike chain. I am changing (trying to anyway) a 9 speed KMC bike chain. The old chain has 108 links and I had planned to just put the same amount of links back on using the new chain. The new chain only has 106 links but is longer than the old chain. Don't really want to start taking links out until I'm absolutely sure what the heck I'm doing. I'm i being thick or is it easier than I am making it. Any advice greatly appreciated.
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
I'd have a recount. :whistle:
The best way to check is to wrap the chain around the big sprocket on the wheel and the big sprocket on the crank (without threading the chain through the rear mech.) You should have a 2-4 link 'overlap'
 
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Anton

Senior Member
Raleighnut was correct I didn't have my abacus available :wacko: anyway I am really not very good at cycle maintenance stuff so thought I'd have a go at changing the chain and cassette. Managed to do it after a little head scratching.

Thanks for the tips everyone.
 
New chains usually have 114/116 links - so I'm sceptical!!
Call me picky, but don't they actually have 57 or 58 links? :smile:

chainpitch.gif
 
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Anton

Senior Member
Just one more question. I actually put an 8 speed chain on a 9 speed cassette. I did this purely because it had more than the 108 links than my 9 speed chain had. I just split the 8 speed to 108 links which I needed. Seems to be running ok. Any potential problems doing it this way?

Thanks
 

shadow master

Well-Known Member
Just one more question. I actually put an 8 speed chain on a 9 speed cassette. I did this purely because it had more than the 108 links than my 9 speed chain had. I just split the 8 speed to 108 links which I needed. Seems to be running ok. Any potential problems doing it this way?

Thanks
The 8 speed chain is slightly wider so you may experience some slight chinging noises on the rear cassette,and precise indexing can be tricky,if you've changed the chain only,it will almost certainly slip in 9th cog(smallest)under hard pedal pressure,nothing to do with 8\9 speed chain,9 speed cassettes just don't like new chains at all,best changed as a pair,90% of people that say there new chain doesnt slip in 9th gear,simply aren't producing enough power to make it slip
 

shadow master

Well-Known Member
Why does it slip? For most on this forum I would have thought the smallest sprocket the least used.
Two reason's really,all though the small sprocket may not be used as much it only has 11\12teeth to take the wear,also its the gear the most pressure can be applied,I've had loads of people that just follow the pedals around and say its fine,I get on the bike and make it slip within 15 yards...doesn't really apply to campag kit as its so agricultural.
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
Two reason's really,all though the small sprocket may not be used as much it only has 11\12teeth to take the wear,also its the gear the most pressure can be applied,I've had loads of people that just follow the pedals around and say its fine,I get on the bike and make it slip within 15 yards...doesn't really apply to campag kit as its so agricultural.
:giggle: My 10 speed Campagnolo set up certainly lets me know when the next gears gone in. :eek:
 
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