Cold Weather Riding (outside)

Discussion in 'Beginners' started by packey3, 10 Jan 2019.

  1. OnTheRopes

    OnTheRopes Regular

    I really don't think exposed knees in really cold weather is a good idea since tendons do not receive direct blood supply like muscle tissue, the body cannot regulate their temperature as well. Like most elastic tissue, when it is colder, it loses elasticity, becoming more vulnerable to tearing at higher force
     
  2. Vantage

    Vantage The dogs chew toy

    I know. My group consists of anywhere between 10-20 riders. And we go to cafes!
    No one's complained about any of us being stinky.
     
  3. slowmotion

    slowmotion Quite dreadful

    Location:
    lost somewhere
    Merino is fine until you start sweating...….then it itches like crazy. I'd rather be comfortable in polyester and stink a bit.
     
    Reiver and DCBassman like this.
  4. rogerzilla

    rogerzilla Guru

    Cold hands and feet are usually a bigger problem than your core. Two pairs of gloves (e.g. silk liners) will stave the cold off a bit longer. Neoprene overshoes work really well.

    Don't leave your water bottle on the bike if you stop and go into a cafe...the movement during riding keeps it liquid, but it gets supercooled and may quickly freeze when still. This happened to half the Beacon RCC club run on one cold ride years ago. Not that you'll need to replace much sweat when it's below freezing.
     
  5. simongt

    simongt Über Member

    Location:
    Norwich
    A variation I believe, of an old Russian saying - 'There's no such thing as bad weather, just bad clothes.' :thumbsup:
     
    Rach1 and Racing roadkill like this.
  6. Heltor Chasca

    Heltor Chasca Out-Riding the Black Dog

    These look comfy.
    9E531E0C-DABC-4E8A-81EE-13903A0461CF.jpeg
     
    Dogtrousers and Yellow Saddle like this.
  7. dave r

    dave r Dunking Diddy Dave Pedalling Pensioner

    Location:
    Holbrooks Coventry
    They look like a pair of y fronts
     
    Pat "5mph", Vantage and Heltor Chasca like this.
  8. mangid

    mangid Veteran

    Location:
    Cambridge
    Never experienced that, and I sweat lots and wear Merino all year round (even on summer days).
     
  9. Heltor Chasca

    Heltor Chasca Out-Riding the Black Dog

    :rolleyes: The devil is in the detail.
     
    dave r likes this.
  10. YukonBoy

    YukonBoy Extra solar

    Location:
    Ultima Thule
    Indeed I find merino ensures I don't get that cold wet feel against the skin that synthetics often end up doing.
     
  11. YukonBoy

    YukonBoy Extra solar

    Location:
    Ultima Thule
    Is that a blue vein on the back of the hand?
     
    Heltor Chasca likes this.
  12. mjr

    mjr Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next

    I've had that happen but it's still better than polyester which itches before you sweat. Cotton and bamboo are better and less sweat-making IMO. Just take care if cotton does get wet, as mentioned pages ago.
     
  13. YukonBoy

    YukonBoy Extra solar

    Location:
    Ultima Thule
    The question is of course how cold would it have to be for tendons to lose elasticity? Certainly bare knees are fine at anything above zero, and probably ok below. Since there are no studies on this we will just have to go by our own experiences I.e. Anecdote.
     
  14. rogerzilla

    rogerzilla Guru

    My knees are clicky if they're not covered and it's below about 13 degrees C, at least for the first mile or so until they warm up a bit*. Given that knees are delicate things, I cover them if in doubt.

    *technically I think the synovial fluid is getting where it should be
     
  15. andrew_s

    andrew_s Guru

    Location:
    Gloucester
    The core may not feel the cold, but it not being warm enough is a prime cause of cold hands and feet.
    Insulate the core, and use the arms and legs to dump excess heat
     
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