Corona Virus: How Are We Doing?

You have the virus

  • Yes

    Votes: 13 5.7%
  • I've been quaranteened

    Votes: 13 5.7%
  • I personally know someone who has been diagnosed

    Votes: 64 28.1%
  • Clear as far as I know

    Votes: 152 66.7%

  • Total voters
    228

classic33

Legendary Member
If they're legal residents, and pay their taxes, then yes they should be treated as they've paid into the system. After all, smokers still get treated when they get ill and they know full well that smoking is bad for them.
Where's the "jab" that will stop you smoking though!

You refuse treatment, you have to sign a form normally. It's a simple statement that help was offered, but declined.

I've signed enough of these in A&E's and the back of ambulance's over the years.
 
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lane

Veteran
If they're legal residents, and pay their taxes, then yes they should be treated as they've paid into the system. After all, smokers still get treated when they get ill and they know full well that smoking is bad for them.
The reason I asked, is because what you fail to understand, or possibly don't want to accept, is that if insufficient people are vaccinated, not just vulnerable but also other age groups, it still may not be possible to open up the economy (which is what you want) without overwhelming the NHS. Therefore restrictions may continue, which you don't want. If you were happy for those not vaccinated to be refused hospital treatment then fair enough, but as you are not, your whole approach is fatally flawed I am afraid.
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
In a months time, we'll be in a situation where it won't matter how many virus infections we get, it won't directly translate into hospitalisations. The winter flu season will also be over by then, so respiratory hospitalisations will fall off further because of that.
 

lane

Veteran
In a months time, we'll be in a situation where it won't matter how many virus infections we get, it won't directly translate into hospitalisations. The winter flu season will also be over by then, so respiratory hospitalisations will fall off further because of that.
40% of those hospitalised for covid are under 55. So I think you are wrong in your assumption.
 

marinyork

Resting in suspended Animation
Location
Logopolis
In a months time, we'll be in a situation where it won't matter how many virus infections we get, it won't directly translate into hospitalisations. The winter flu season will also be over by then, so respiratory hospitalisations will fall off further because of that.
Perception may be something along those lines.

I believe the figures that influence behaviour and perceptions are primarily deaths, the headline hospitalisations the new benchmark is 40,000, so you're probably right about how large sections of the population will see it.

I do think there's potentially a swine flu attitude that'll prevail.
 

stowie

Legendary Member
Anyone who isn't interested in having the vaccine clearly isn't that concerned about the virus, so why worry about groups of people who in any case don't want any nanny state restrictions on them going about their business as they see fit.
As far as I'm concerned the whole lockdown thing should be scrapped immediately, no stay at home, back to work, back to school, socialising as normal, pubs open, all the other shops open. Just get it sorted!
I - along with many millions of adults - have not yet been offered the vaccine. I assume that we will be simply collateral damage or something.

Before you go on about it only affecting the elderly.. I got COVID over Christmas. I got it mildly. It laid me up in bed for 2 weeks and another 2 weeks to recover to the point I didn't have to sleep at times during the day. My next door neighbour got it a little worse. He was in bed for over 3 weeks and couldn't work for another 3 weeks with about another month to start to feel fully recovered. Two work friends were hospitalised over Christmas with COVID - the same thing, pneumonia and clots in the lungs. One other colleague had been off his work since beginning of December and has just resigned because he cannot realistically see a time in the short term when he will be able to go back to work. All of us are in our 40's.
 

classic33

Legendary Member
In a months time, we'll be in a situation where it won't matter how many virus infections we get, it won't directly translate into hospitalisations. The winter flu season will also be over by then, so respiratory hospitalisations will fall off further because of that.
You mean like we were at the same time last year?
 

MrGrumpy

Huge Member
Location
Fly Fifer
As far as I'm concerned the whole lockdown thing should be scrapped immediately, no stay at home, back to work, back to school, socialising as normal, pubs open, all the other shops open. Just get it sorted!
So what do we do about a continuing overwhelmed NHS service ? That’s the trade off ? You want it sorted but don’t want to play your part as in your words the virus does not bother you ? It clearly does !?
 

Unkraut

Master of the Inane Comment
Location
Germany
The winter flu season will also be over by then, so respiratory hospitalisations will fall off further because of that.
I recently saw the figure that, unlike the usual thousands of flu cases in the winter season, the number for Germany so far is 169.

The beneficial affect of measures to contain corona has been a significant reduction in the load on hospitals as other causes of illness and accidents have reduced.

This only goes to show how much more dangerous corona can be with the threat of hospitals being overwhelmed despite the offset against other illnesses.
 

All uphill

I didn't recognise you but I knew your bike
Location
Somerset
I previously reported that our fit and healthy 27 year old son had covid in July 2020. The initial infection was mild - loss of taste/smell and fatigue; the after effects have been devastating, huge fatigue, brain fog, muscle pains. He has been unable to work, of course.

Now, seven months later, he is just about able to start doing some part time work.

Independent Sage estimates that there are 60 000 people in this kind of position.

I am not very sympathetic to people who won't take simple measures to reduce this impact!
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
I previously reported that our fit and healthy 27 year old son had covid in July 2020. The initial infection was mild - loss of taste/smell and fatigue; the after effects have been devastating, huge fatigue, brain fog, muscle pains. He has been unable to work, of course.

Now, seven months later, he is just about able to start doing some part time work.

Independent Sage estimates that there are 60 000 people in this kind of position.

I am not very sympathetic to people who won't take simple measures to reduce this impact!
Hope he's well on the way to recovery. I've read numerous accounts, including from another cycling forum - there is a thread with long covid.
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
Independent Sage estimates that there are 60 000 people in this kind of position.
Put that in context though; what have the total UK infections been so far? I mean the real, actual numbers, not the official ones which are massively under-reported because the majority of people with the virus will not have had a test.
Even if the real vs official infection rate was only a modest 4:1 over the course of the whole outbreak, then that would make 16 million actual cases. The stuff that gets reported on via government stats and in the media is only the tip of the iceberg, and will mainly be the worse cases involving severe infections. 60,000 cases with lingering after-effects is a substantial number if an accurate estimate, but it may only represent one in every 250 infections.
 
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