Dahon Mariner i7,...

tds101

Active Member
Here's a little review, based on my shoddy breathing after having Covid 19 at the beginning of the year.

Straight out the box, all I needed to do was install the pedals, tighten a few screws and such, adjust the brakes & tune the shifting. Took me a few minutes to figure out how to tighten/loosen the lockjaw hinge latch. Simple enough,...

Folding/unfolding is definitely, different. The Deltec cable has the other cables wrapped up with it, making it a slower process. The handlebars need to be unlatched to be able to move, so you can get them into the correct position, then close the latch, locking them in place. Otherwise, it's almost the same. The latch on the underside of the frame's lockjaw hinge does need to be watched , so you don't catch the cables when opening or closing the thing. The magnets are fantastic, so far. I carried the bike a little, to see if they felt like they'd separate. Feels good.

I immediately swapped pedals for some Wellgo folding pedals I have, and the seat/seatpost was removed also. I think the current seat would be just fine, but there's one small issue with the seatpost. Most folding bikes that I own use the seatpost to stand on, as the bottom of it is designed be utilized in such a manner. This seatpost is stamped with an advisory that there's a maximum insertion point, and apparently it's not supposed to be used in such a way. And to top it off, there's no end cap, which would protect the end of the seatpost from being damaged on the ground. Now, some bikes have an extra part attached to the frame on the bottom bracket, extending past the chainring, that's used to stand the bike on when folded, preventing damage to the chainring. This bike doesn't have it. Why Dahon decided to omit the proper seatpost is beyond me. Luckily I have a few in the basement,...

Ride quality wasn't what I'd expected. It rides like a minivelo/non-folding bike. There's no frame flex (as expected with the 250lb weight limit + Deltec cable), but it's something I was pleasantly surprised about. I'm used to some flex/noise, and this was a solid feeling ride. The handlebar stem does has the standard minimal flex, but it so small it's something I probably should have just stayed quiet about it. The Schwalbe Citizen tires (20"x1.75" w/K-guard & reflection) seem decent enough, and I didn't feel bumps and such all too much with them. I thought I'd be having my teeth chattering, but combined with the aluminum frame, it's a surprisingly plush ride.

Lastly, I will discuss the gearing. As mentioned, the chainring on the Mariner i7 isn't the largest, but adding a bigger chainring isn't necessarily an option here, at least not for me. The gear inches are 30" - 90", so a larger chainring would mean that hills would be a chore (again, for ME). The speed is decent, but this is no speed demon, that's for sure. I find it acceptable for my needs. I'd been dying to acquire an internally geared Dahon for YEARS. This is a total WIN for me. When riding it's a nice, easy experience. The Mariner i7 also coasts fantastically well. You really don't experience excessive drag from the Shimano Nexus 7 speed IGH. That was another welcome surprise. It's not excessively loud when coasting, and that's another plus. And after a few squeaky minutes, braking was quiet too.

Overall, I'm pleased with my current new addition to my bike family.

If I missed anything, please ask. I'm techie enough to answer some questions, but I'm not well versed enough to discuss the minute details.
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Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
Interesting read TDS, thanks for posting.
 
Interesting to read your thoughts on the Dahon, it's refreshing to see something different to a Brompton. I've always been a firm advocate of internal geared hubs on these small wheeled folders, derailleur transmissions are just too close to the ground and need constant cleaning and fettling to keep running. My Tern is a single speed which is also a simple and reliable way of doing things.

Unless the manual or Dahon have expressly stated otherwise, the minimum insertion mark on the seatpost is for when you are riding the bike, not for folding it. My bike also has this mark just to prevent you from having it too low in the frame when riding, when folded I can push the post all the way down so it acts as a stand for the rest of the bike. Like you though, I also don't have any protection on the end of the post to prevent it from damage when it's like this.
 

rustybolts

Senior Member
Location
Ireland
Whats the furthest you have gone on it ? I bought a Mariner D8 just before Covid arrived , its still in the bag but will get it going in the Spring ( I hope ) I intend to bus it into Dublin city ( free travel OAP) then train ride followed by a hilly 19K to my destination . Will it manage this ?
 
OP
tds101

tds101

Active Member
Interesting to read your thoughts on the Dahon, it's refreshing to see something different to a Brompton. I've always been a firm advocate of internal geared hubs on these small wheeled folders, derailleur transmissions are just too close to the ground and need constant cleaning and fettling to keep running. My Tern is a single speed which is also a simple and reliable way of doing things.

Unless the manual or Dahon have expressly stated otherwise, the minimum insertion mark on the seatpost is for when you are riding the bike, not for folding it. My bike also has this mark just to prevent you from having it too low in the frame when riding, when folded I can push the post all the way down so it acts as a stand for the rest of the bike. Like you though, I also don't have any protection on the end of the post to prevent it from damage when it's like this.
Ok, I guess you didn't actually read what I posted. It states, on the seatpost itself, that there's a MAXIMUM insertion point, AS WELL AS a minimum. I own 4 Dahon folding bikes, as well as A Downtube Mini, an Origami Wasp, and a Tern Joe P24. They've included a seatpost that's strangely unprepared to do it's job for a folding bike to stand on when folded. My other Dahon folders have, at minimum, a plastic end piece on them.
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tds101

tds101

Active Member
Whats the furthest you have gone on it ? I bought a Mariner D8 just before Covid arrived , its still in the bag but will get it going in the Spring ( I hope ) I intend to bus it into Dublin city ( free travel OAP) then train ride followed by a hilly 19K to my destination . Will it manage this ?
I've only been able to do about 8 miles so far. It's a very comfortable bike, so I really want to ride, time permitting. As for your riding, it depends on your fitness level. You have a Dahon Mariner D8, so you have a derailleur. I have internal gearing, so the ride will be a bit different. I'd highly recommend riding a bit around your neighborhood before longer trips. Acclimate yourself to the bike, or you may not be prepared for the longer trip.
 
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Ok, I guess you didn't actually read what I posted. It states, on the seatpost itself, that there's a MAXIMUM insertion point, AS WELL AS a minimum. I own 4 Dahon folding bikes, as well as A Downtube Mini, an Origami Wasp, and a Tern Joe P24. They've included a seatpost that's strangely unprepared to do it's job for a folding bike to stand on when folded. My other Dahon folders have, at minimum, a plastic end piece on them.
View attachment 559193
OK, so I mistyped minimum instead of maximum. My point still stands. I have exactly the same markings on my Tern Link seatpost and it refers to when you are riding the bike, not when it's folded. You can lower the post as low as you want to when it's folded and use it as the stand.
 
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shingwell

Active Member
Presumably the marking is there because when inserted more than MAX the seat tube is sticking out of the bottom quite a bit, and would be dangerous to ride because it could catch on a kerb or pothole edge or something.
 
Here's a photo of my bike from the official Tern website, clearly showing the seat post lowered beyond the MAXIMUM insertion mark and used as a stand for the folded bike. As I said above, these marks on the post are just there for when you are riding the bike, not to stop you folding it.

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OP
tds101

tds101

Active Member
Here's a photo of my bike from the official Tern website, clearly showing the seat post lowered beyond the MAXIMUM insertion mark and used as a stand for the folded bike. As I said above, these marks on the post are just there for when you are riding the bike, not to stop you folding it.

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I got what was implied. The problem is the seatpost is different from what they normally sell here in the USA, including being bare aluminum on the end. No other seatpost that I have, on all my other folders, is the way this one is. It's easier to damage, and slightly shorter. It's as simple as that. Other reviews I've seen had mentioned it in passing. I mentioned it so a person can be prepared to locate an end cap. I'm planning on visiting a chain hardware store here in the USA - Home Depot. I'll purchase an end cap for my it there. Otherwise, it's designed differently than the other seatposts.

Here's a picture of it folded, from the internet, and it's the standard Dahon fold. The end cap isn't there,.. The end is ROUGH aluminum.
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shingwell

Active Member
I hardly dare suggest... if you're desperate... would a Brompton seat post bung fit? :whistle:

In the uk, from Brilliant Bikes. Of the two seat posts I looked at they say one is 31.6mm dia and one is 31.8mm dia but they don't say if that is internal or external.:rolleyes:
 
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