danube and rhine cycleways

has anyone done the danube and rhine cycleways from start to finish or long parts of them how was it experiences and photos please is camping feasible or not?
I cycled from Amsterdam to Koblenz: we had to bail there because of an injury: the plan was to keep going to Stuttgart.

The route qualits was a bit variable but generally well signposted and mostly either tarmac or ridable gravel; very rarely was it on a road, much less a major road. It was occasionally be a bit confusing in large towns or cities like Duisburg or Köln but far from impossible. We had one problem where a diversion took us through a field and we had to dismantle a fence to get the Bakfiets past it, but that was several years ago so I expect they've repaired it now.

Wild camping was near impossible: we managed it once because we were stuck miles from a campsite, but campsites were plentiful and not too expensive. We went all posh one night (planned to be halfway) and used a youth hostel on Bonn. You can imagine the excitement of having electricity. The YH also had a locked garage for the bikes, which I'm told isn't unusual.

Overall it was great: Friendly people, good cycling and pleasant scenery. If it hadn't pi**ed it down half the time it would have been perfect.
 
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Dave Davenport

Legendary Member
Location
Hampshire
We did the section of the Rhine between Strasbourg and Lake Constance whilst on a UK to Zagreb trip. Nothing spectacular but nice enough riding, plenty of campsites but a few of them crammed the (many) cycle tourists onto a small space, although we were there in August so might be quieter another time.

Not done much of the Danube, only the bit between Vienna and Budapest, which was a bit rubbish.
 
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The Crofted Crest

Über Member
The Rhine is great, quiet roads, bike paths, straightforward navigation. Signposting gets a bit hit and miss in cities (and there are quite few of them in Germany). Switzerland is lumpy in the upper reaches. Going downstream is nicer unless you're a bit of a mountain goat. Lots of campsites, cheap hotels, nice people, good food (especially if you like Schnitzel, bratwurst, pommes, uzw).

Bikeline do an English-language guide to the Danube. The route* is almost 100% on family-friendly, car-free bike paths, more than averagely interesting and is packed with pensioners on jollies at weekends. Lots of campsites, cheap hotels, nice people, good food (especially if you like Schnitzel, bratwurst, pommes, uzw).

Caveat: * Only done the bits in Germany and Austria. The flat bits on both rivers can get a bit too flat.

Go for it.
 
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Brains

Legendary Member
Location
Greenwich
Done long sections of both rivers.
In my opinion some of the best cycle touring available, great cycle paths, superb infrastructure.

I would also very strongly recommend the BikeLine books, (even if you can only get the German versions), the maps are essential and the best available. they also have an index for all the local accommodation from camp sites to 5 star hotels
 

Brains

Legendary Member
Location
Greenwich
Camping is feasible (in season), lots of people do it, in high season you may struggle to get into some camp sites on the more popular sections

Wild/Stealth camping would also be possible outside the high season (as long as you stopped late and started early) and for many of the sections there are picnic sports every few KM, many of which make great places to quietly camp
 
Wild/Stealth camping would also be possible outside the high season (as long as you stopped late and started early) and for many of the sections there are picnic sports every few KM, many of which make great places to quietly camp
Ironically this is one thing I can't get away with now: since getting German nationality I can't pull the "I'm a foreigener and didn't know the rules" schtick...
 
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