Doing the way of the rose's will my bike ok ???

Jamieyorky

Über Member
Location
York
Ok so ive been roped into doing the way of the rose's in the summer along with a friend, we will be camping so will have a bit of luggage but my bike only has 23mm gatorskins on it, will i have to get some new tyres or will i be ok?

The bike is this converted flat bar road bike
 

busdennis

Über Member
hi
it may do it, it may not, I do think this is a case when bigger is better
 
OP
Jamieyorky

Jamieyorky

Über Member
Location
York
Haven't done this one yet but we used to go away with a bloke and he was always on his road bike with panniers etc. Don't see why it shouldn't be ok.
I think i should be ok, the wheels are mavic cxp 30's on shimano 600 hubs so i think they are strong enough, it was just the tyre size. I shouldnt have too much stuff with me and my friend is on his dawes galaxy so she can carry most of it :thumbsup:, i will have my panniers and a rack bag and may invest in a bar bag will have to see
 

jack smith

Über Member
Location
Durham
If your concerened bigger tyres would do alot for comfort over rougher ground just make sire your mudguards can fit them you should be okay up to 25c but any further i cant advise you
 

Soltydog

Legendary Member
Location
near Hornsea
The vast majority of the WOTR is tarmac, so don't worry about your tyres :thumbsup: It's a while since I did it, but I'm struggling to think of any other surface anywhere on the route :wacko:
 
We did the Way of the Roses in September 2013; you can read about it (and the return trip) here. Surfaces are pretty good - it's all tarmac - and there's nothing that would challenge someone B&Bing on a road bike with 23mm tyres. But....

You say you'll be camping. I'd have to say I'd be thinking about wider tyres. And hauling a camping load up and down steep hills (unless you and the load are both serious lightweights) is asking for trouble on racing wheels (32 spokes or less). It might be worth using this as an excuse to get a tougher bike or maybe just a pair of tougher wheels with wider rims, 36 spokes and 32mm tyres. At least, consider putting a 32 mm tyre on the back - this will have the volume to cushion the spokes from any serious potholes and might save you a busted spoke or two.

Yeah, Derrick did it on a road bike - but he wasn't camping. Unless you're a real gnarly minimalist camper, camping gear tends to add up to a considerable weight. Hauling it up a hill adds further strain to those rear-wheel spokes...

There are some challenging climbs as you come through the the Dales. Pately Bridge and Settle areas in particular: be prepared for those with strong legs or low gears or both, and check your brakes - especially if you're hauling a load.


Yeah, our tyres are a bit more than 23mm. But then there are two of us on the bike - and our camping gear.

PS - is it my ageing eyesight, or is there no rear brake on your bike?
 
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PK99

Legendary Member
Location
SW19
I did it on 25 tyres on my van nic Yukon. No problems anywhere.
 

Kev Riddehough

Active Member
A group of 20 did it last year with the majority of us on roadies. Only little bit of track is just as your leaving York en route to Driffield but even that didn't pose any problems at all.

A truly fantastic route with views to die for.

Take extreme care when descending Green How Hill going into Patley Bridge.

Apart from that, enjoy your trip
 
OP
Jamieyorky

Jamieyorky

Über Member
Location
York
A group of 20 did it last year with the majority of us on roadies. Only little bit of track is just as your leaving York en route to Driffield but even that didn't pose any problems at all.

A truly fantastic route with views to die for.

Take extreme care when descending Green How Hill going into Patley Bridge.

Apart from that, enjoy your trip
Yes people have told me about the hill, isnt there a sharp bend at the bottom?
 
I suppose it depends.....

If you have a bit of <cough> middle age spread and tip the scales a bit too and are fully loaded for touring, then I'd definitely recommend 36 spokes and wider tyres. You might still be fine though; depends on how much you weigh and how much stuff you will be carrying.

Another thing to consider: your gearing on a flat bar road bike isn't suitable for hills while carrying a load. While not a showstopper, it may necessitate you pushing the bike and equipment up hills. Something to think about -this may be more dependent on who you are cycling with and how fit they are, and their potential willingness to wait for you (if that bothers you).

Either way, I'd get the widest tyres you can if you have extra weight; it will help smooth out the bumps and will be kinder to your rims. Of course, this could also be the ideal excuse to get another bike!

(if the person you are with is also not on a road bike and is of similar fitness, and if money permits, I'd suggest an older unsuspended mtb with slicks and relaxed geometry to tour with -sometimes you can get them incredibly cheaply. I did that and found a 90's Specialized Hardrock to be a great touring bike).

Edit: do I see that's only a double crank on there? If so, definitely would recommend a triple and lower gearing...... Or if you have to do this, it really could be just about as cheap to just get an old mtb with slicks on. While you could do it, I do think you may end up pushing that bike a lot.
 
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derrick

The Glue that binds us together.
I suppose it depends.....

If you have a bit of <cough> middle age spread and tip the scales a bit too and are fully loaded for touring, then I'd definitely recommend 36 spokes and wider tyres. You might still be fine though; depends on how much you weigh and how much stuff you will be carrying.

Another thing to consider: your gearing on a flat bar road bike isn't suitable for hills while carrying a load. While not a showstopper, it may necessitate you pushing the bike and equipment up hills. Something to think about -this may be more dependent on who you are cycling with and how fit they are, and their potential willingness to wait for you (if that bothers you).

Either way, I'd get the widest tyres you can if you have extra weight; it will help smooth out the bumps and will be kinder to your rims. Of course, this could also be the ideal excuse to get another bike!

(if the person you are with is also not on a road bike and is of similar fitness, and if money permits, I'd suggest an older unsuspended mtb with slicks and relaxed geometry to tour with -sometimes you can get them incredibly cheaply. I did that and found a 90's Specialized Hardrock to be a great touring bike).

Edit: do I see that's only a double crank on there? If so, definitely would recommend a triple and lower gearing...... Or if you have to do this, it really could be just about as cheap to just get an old mtb with slicks on. While you could do it, I do think you may end up pushing that bike a lot.
He ain't going up Mount Everest, the way of the roses has a couple of bumps to get over. He will be fine:thumbsup:
 
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