Farewell Corridori Cycle Sport

PK99

Legendary Member
Location
SW19

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
An unfortunate victim of the "I need an LBS to change an inner tube because I can't do it myself but I'm going to buy my bike online because it's cheaper" type of cyclist.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Shame to see them close...
I never bought anything major from them (I was going to buy my first Roadbike there in about 2011 - a red Bianchi - but then I was persuaded by Pearson's that I had to spend £500 more on one of their carbon models...chap from Pearson's had to call Corridori to apologise :laugh:

I also testrode a J Guillem Ti up to the Downs, a gorgeous bike, but in the end I couldn't justify spending a grand more than on the Sabbath I ended up with (for a bike that didn't have rack and mudguard mounts).

They also never had any women's clothing in anything above a size 12 so no good for me :wacko:

I wonder if they've been too heavily affected by stock shortages, probably had a great Q2/3 in 2020 and have struggled since to get anything to sell?
 
OP
P

PK99

Legendary Member
Location
SW19
Shame to see them close...
I never bought anything major from them (I was going to buy my first Roadbike there in about 2011 - a red Bianchi - but then I was persuaded by Pearson's that I had to spend £500 more on one of their carbon models...chap from Pearson's had to call Corridori to apologise :laugh:
That neatly encapsulates the difference between the two shops: Pearson have a well-earned reputation for up-selling. Corridori sold what the rider needed.. I bought 4 bikes from Corridori - none from Pearson. But many people are intensely loyal to Pearson - but they have now sold the Sutton shop and now hail from the much wealthier Barnes - certainly a better fit with the range they prefer to sell.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
That neatly encapsulates the difference between the two shops: Pearson have a well-earned reputation for up-selling. Corridori sold what the rider needed.. I bought 4 bikes from Corridori - none from Pearson. But many people are intensely loyal to Pearson - but they have now sold the Sutton shop and now hail from the much wealthier Barnes - certainly a better fit with the range they prefer to sell.
All the same staff still in Sutton now it’s Balfes which is the most important thing (ie their very helpful mechanics)...and a much bigger range of bike brands.
Corridori seemed to only really sell Specialized and then lots of niche expensive stuff so didn’t really appeal to me.
Tbh I still have the Pearson carbon, I would have long since parted with the Bianchi
 
OP
P

PK99

Legendary Member
Location
SW19
All the same staff still in Sutton now it’s Balfes which is the most important thing (ie their very helpful mechanics)...and a much bigger range of bike brands.
Corridori seemed to only really sell Specialized and then lots of niche expensive stuff so didn’t really appeal to me.
Tbh I still have the Pearson carbon, I would have long since parted with the Bianchi
Corridori were a Specialised flagship independent, but Spesh pulled the plug on that market a few years ago. I think Corridori have found it difficult since then
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
I wonder if it's just a case of the owner wishing to put his feet up and retire.? I can't see any half decent LBS in and around Epsom being short of customers given that it's a well-off area and a lot of cycling goes on around the downs.
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
I wonder if it's just a case of the owner wishing to put his feet up and retire.? I can't see any half decent LBS in and around Epsom being short of customers given that it's a well-off area and a lot of cycling goes on around the downs.
I don't know the shop or the area but if it was a business giving the owner a decent living it would surely have been sold as a going concern.

As for the well off types, in my experience of providing various customer services over the years they are mostly a bunch of tight bastards.

And they never tip :angry:
 

Paul_Smith SRCC

www.plsmith.co.uk
Location
Surrey UK
I wonder if it's just a case of the owner wishing to put his feet up and retire.?..
'Guy' like 'George' at GB Cycles owned the premises; so both were in a position to be able to sell up and retire.

I dare say many of us this last year have evaluated our lives, add to that in their case with supply of both bikes and parts is so incredible poor with no sign of that improving then now is a good time to make that decision to retire; good luck to both of them.
 
Last edited:

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
I don't know the shop or the area but if it was a business giving the owner a decent living it would surely have been sold as a going concern.

As for the well off types, in my experience of providing various customer services over the years they are mostly a bunch of tight bastards.

And they never tip :angry:
Probably little in the way of bikes or spare parts inventory as assets, so all the value is the premesis. There's not much intangible "goodwill" value in a shop sold as a going concern if a new owner can't get his hands on enough goods to sell to customers. Customers are sourcing bikes from where they can get them, not necessarily from their LBS they have dealt with for years. Loyalty gets stretched when the shop can't supply, even though the customer has the cash and is willing to buy.

Well-off types tend to be well-off for a reason; they don't throw their money around like confetti. When they buy, they know exactly what thing they want to buy and how much they are willing to pay for it - namely the minimum amount that will swing the deal.
Nothing wrong with frugality, so long as it doesn't cross the line into parsimony.
 
Last edited:
Though sad, it is the end of a long innings for speciality stores. With online behemoths with volume driven cheaper prices and next day delivery, it was a lost cause.

It is no surprise some LBS switched to lattes and cakes. There is no way Wiggles and Amazon can replicate the ambience and barista made hot macchiato. F&B demand is growing as affluence grows and people need to take a break from the daily grind.

Even Pubs are slowing becoming gastropubs to pull in families and a wider crowd. Walk into a gastropub in London and you see more women than men at 4pm. And they come in groups.

Years ago, I read with admiration how a small LBS run by a couple in Ballynure, 20 miles outside Belfast became such a successful online store selling cycling gear to the World from Cape Town to Sydney.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Though sad, it is the end of a long innings for speciality stores. With online behemoths with volume driven cheaper prices and next day delivery, it was a lost cause.

It is no surprise some LBS switched to lattes and cakes. There is no way Wiggles and Amazon can replicate the ambience and barista made hot macchiato. F&B demand is growing as affluence grows and people need to take a break from the daily grind.

Even Pubs are slowing becoming gastropubs to pull in families and a wider crowd. Walk into a gastropub in London and you see more women than men at 4pm. And they come in groups.

Years ago, I read with admiration how a small LBS run by a couple in Ballynure, 20 miles outside Belfast became such a successful online store selling cycling gear to the World from Cape Town to Sydney.
Chain Reaction now owned by Wiggle?
 
Top Bottom