Fixing a bike after a road accident

annirak

Über Member
Location
Cambridge, UK
I know that I'll probably have to get an LBS to quote me on prices, so this will be pretty hypothetical.

I was in an accident last summer. My front wheel is warped by about 5cm. My left shifter was pushed round quite a lot, and the handlebars turned with respect to the fork.

I'm not looking to fix cosmetic damage, just to get my bike ridable again. How fixable is a warped wheel? My bike has a carbon fork. Is it possible to check a carbon fork for damage, or should I just replace it? I'll have to check the shifters out and see if they work.

Is there anything else I need to check?
 

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vickster

Legendary Member
You can get carbon forks checked by specialists, x rayed. I'd replace a damaged wheel myself. Insurance claim isn't it? Get the fork replaced too
 
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annirak

annirak

Über Member
Location
Cambridge, UK
It's definitely an insurance claim. But the settlement would be after this season, so I'm wondering if it's practical to bring the bike back to life before summer.
 

KneesUp

Guru
The shifter has a band that holds it on to the handlebars. There will be an allen bolt to tighten/loosen it - chances are it is under the lever. Loosen it off, move the shifter, tighten it up.

Then loosen the two allen bolts that hold the stem, straighten the bars and tighten up again.

My LBS will sort out a buckled wheel for £20. Get them to check the forks.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
It's definitely an insurance claim. But the settlement would be after this season, so I'm wondering if it's practical to bring the bike back to life before summer.
You can request an interim payment to fix / replace the bike. It's the injury side that takes forever to settle, as the bike isn't going to recover, you will. All assuming the other side has accepted liability

Aren't you buying a new bike anyhow?
 

Globalti

Legendary Member
Where does this idea of X-raying bikes come from? It wouldn't show damage to carbon fibres and is expensive and difficult if not impossible to do. Better to carry out a thorough physical examination; any damage will be evident when you squeeze the affected area and pull and push at the forks.
 
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annirak

annirak

Über Member
Location
Cambridge, UK
Aren't you buying a new bike anyhow?
I'd love to. I can't find the bike I want; it sounds like the bike I want will be common in the next couple of years, since the bike industry is moving towards discs. If I can get the bike back on the road for a reasonable price it might be worthwhile doing that and waiting until the bits I want are more universally available.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Buy something to tide you over and then sell when the dream bike appears?
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Where does this idea of X-raying bikes come from? It wouldn't show damage to carbon fibres and is expensive and difficult if not impossible to do. Better to carry out a thorough physical examination; any damage will be evident when you squeeze the affected area and pull and push at the forks.
My limited understanding from what I was told is it will show cracks that may not be visible otherwise. Then if someone else is paying, just replace
 

172traindriver

Legendary Member
Where does this idea of X-raying bikes come from? It wouldn't show damage to carbon fibres and is expensive and difficult if not impossible to do. Better to carry out a thorough physical examination; any damage will be evident when you squeeze the affected area and pull and push at the forks.
Not sure if it would justify the cost or the value of the bike, but Canyon were selling ex team bikes either Movistar or Katusha and in the T&C's were may have a few scuff marks etc, but frames will be x-rayed for any signs of crash damage.
 
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