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Forward Facing Semi Dropout with Quick Release

XE007

Member
Hi guys,

I have a question.
I have a bike with a semi-horizontal dropout. The bike in question is going to be a single speed with the wheelset being a quick release (QR) cassette hub. The horizontal dropout is not totally horizontal but 45 degree like this picture:

https://www.sefiles.net/images/library/zoom/surly-pack-rat-26-inch-frameset-321973-1.jpg

Will there be any problems with this setup?
Do I really need a chain tensioner?
Will there be any slippage seeing that the dropout is forward facing 45 degrees?
Any suggestions?


It is hard finding a good 406 wheelset that are bolt axles without spending an arm or a leg. I did find a good set on Alibaba but again it is a QR.

Thanks for any help or findings.
 

Mike Ayling

Senior Member
Hi guys,

I have a question.
I have a bike with a semi-horizontal dropout. The bike in question is going to be a single speed with the wheelset being a quick release (QR) cassette hub. The horizontal dropout is not totally horizontal but 45 degree like this picture:

https://www.sefiles.net/images/library/zoom/surly-pack-rat-26-inch-frameset-321973-1.jpg

Will there be any problems with this setup?
Do I really need a chain tensioner?
Will there be any slippage seeing that the dropout is forward facing 45 degrees?
Any suggestions?


It is hard finding a good 406 wheelset that are bolt axles without spending an arm or a leg. I did find a good set on Alibaba but again it is a QR.

Thanks for any help or findings.
I rode fixed on a frame with drop outs like that.
You should not have any trouble with a single speed freewheel.
You should not need a chain tensioner, plenty of space in those drop outs to adjust chain tension.

Mike
 

C R

Veteran
Location
Worcester
Hi guys,

I have a question.
I have a bike with a semi-horizontal dropout. The bike in question is going to be a single speed with the wheelset being a quick release (QR) cassette hub. The horizontal dropout is not totally horizontal but 45 degree like this picture:

https://www.sefiles.net/images/library/zoom/surly-pack-rat-26-inch-frameset-321973-1.jpg

Will there be any problems with this setup?
Do I really need a chain tensioner?
Will there be any slippage seeing that the dropout is forward facing 45 degrees?
Any suggestions?


It is hard finding a good 406 wheelset that are bolt axles without spending an arm or a leg. I did find a good set on Alibaba but again it is a QR.

Thanks for any help or findings.
My commuter has that kind of drop outs, and is fine with QR axles, though mine is geared, but that should make no difference.
 

rogerzilla

Legendary Member
In the olden days we all rode frames with horizontal dropouts and QRs. Italian frames usually had chromed dropouts, which are even more slippy. It still worked, but you may need the QR tighter (and the hub bearings that little bit slacker) than you've become used to with vertical dropouts.

Bikes with granny rings benefit more from vertical dropouts as it's easier to "pull a wheel over" with the higher chain tension. MTBs really accelerated the change, which became possible once the B-tension screw appeared on rear mechs. Without this feature, you had to slide the whole wheel to get the best proximity between upper pulley and sprockets.
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
You will be OK. The bike I'm riding on the left is actually a track frame, with rear facing horizontal drop outs. The QR held both the wheel and the gear hanger in place with no slippage.
 

MichaelW2

Veteran
There are two styles of qr skewer, good ones with an internal all metal cam eg Shimano and Campagnolo, and bad ones made from aluminium extrusions with an external plastic cam surface. The bad ones are fine for vertical dropouts but may not be strong enough to hold in horizontal dropouts under the heaviest loading.
 
OP
X

XE007

Member
Ahh, thanks everyone and it has saved me money.
One last question. The bike I have is an aluminum bike frame. I know it is stiffer than steel as steel seems more pliable but how hard would i have to clamp the QR on an aluminum bike?

So from your answers above, steel or titanium based QRs are the way to go?

Thanks!
 

C R

Veteran
Location
Worcester
Ahh, thanks everyone and it has saved me money.
One last question. The bike I have is an aluminum bike frame. I know it is stiffer than steel as steel seems more pliable but how hard would i have to clamp the QR on an aluminum bike?

So from your answers above, steel or titanium based QRs are the way to go?

Thanks!
With an aluminium frame you would be more likely to damage the dropout if you overtighten, so more care is needed.

Re the skewers, I'll be a contrarian here, and say that I have el cheapo skewers in mine, and have had no issues, down to using a 28x34 gear. YMMV.
 

ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
So from your answers above, steel or titanium based QRs are the way to go?
I would stick to steel. I have never had any problem with standard steel Campagnolo or Shimano QRs but I have known 2 people with lightweight, fancy titanium QRs pull their back wheel over. One of them repeatedly tried to get the QR tight enough but it kept on happening so it was replaced with a steel Shimano one.
 
OP
X

XE007

Member
With an aluminium frame you would be more likely to damage the dropout if you overtighten, so more care is needed.

Re the skewers, I'll be a contrarian here, and say that I have el cheapo skewers in mine, and have had no issues, down to using a 28x34 gear. YMMV.
Thanks will keep an eye on that.

I would stick to steel. I have never had any problem with standard steel Campagnolo or Shimano QRs but I have known 2 people with lightweight, fancy titanium QRs pull their back wheel over. One of them repeatedly tried to get the QR tight enough but it kept on happening so it was replaced with a steel Shimano one.
Yeah, that would make sense as titanium has more flex. Will stick to steel then.
 

rogerzilla

Legendary Member
Are you sure the dropouts don't have steel facings? Aluminium is, as stated above, a bit soft for the increased sliding and abrasion that horizontal ends get. Dolan track bikes (for example) have replaceable dropout faces.
 
OP
X

XE007

Member
Are you sure the dropouts don't have steel facings? Aluminium is, as stated above, a bit soft for the increased sliding and abrasion that horizontal ends get. Dolan track bikes (for example) have replaceable dropout faces.
Good question. Sadly, it looks aluminum as this is a made in China bicycle. Would rubber/shim padding on exterior keep it from sliding? Just trying to think outside the box.

I will get a magnet and check if steel is welded to the aluminum part.
 

si_c

Veteran
Location
Wirral
Get a high quality Shimano QR which has steel ends and it will bite into the drop outs better. Don't worry about fitting them with anything between frame and QR.
 

Ajax Bay

Veteran
Location
East Devon
Damaging dropouts by 'over-tightening' is a non-issue. There's no movement unless they're not sufficiently tight (dent in palm of tightening hand).
Noone but a weight-weenie would contemplate Ti QR skewers.
The Shimano type QR skewers are a much better engineering design than the 'cheaper to manufacture but less effective/assured' - as Michael said; "good ones with an internal all metal cam eg Shimano and Campagnolo, and bad ones made from aluminium extrusions with an external plastic cam surface".
 
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