Getting flashed from oncoming cars

Matthew_T

"Young and Ex-whippet"
A new thing happening recently I have found is that cars seem to be flashing me when I have got my light on high beam. It is a Cree T6 and quotes 1800 lumens.
Yesterday when I was out, I stopped on a secluded pathway and had a good look at my front light from the distance drivers would see it. And yes, it is very bright.I then went the rest of the journey turning down my light when a car was coming.

Should I have to turn down my light and what is the law on cyclists dazzling other drivers? I know the highway code states that motorists need to turn down their lights when approaching a cyclist, but it is vice versa?
 

Davidc

Guru
Location
Somerset UK
Bike or anything else - it's illegal to dazzle other road users (see HC).

It's also unpleasant, inconsiderate and totally unnecessary.
 

MrJamie

Oaf on a Bike
Its more courtesy than anything I think and perhaps also safety, although I dont think its regulated enough to be illegal. I think some windscreens reduce the glare too, but looking at a bright Cree light screws your vision quite badly.

I have two similar lights on the front, sounds too much, but i have one aimed down and one aimed near horizontal which i use as you would a full beam in a car ie. only when theres nothing infront of me.

Edit: I should probably read the HC ;)
 

gaz

Cycle Camera TV
Location
South Croydon
No need for 1800 lumens on the a road with street lamps. If you are being flashed by cars, it is because you are dazzling / blinding them with your light. Turn the power down and angle it down, there will be enough spill for it to still be effective.

On unlit roads where 1800 lumens may be required to see ahead of you. If a car is in visible sight of you, turn the light down.
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
I run a 1600 lumen lamp, and keep it aimed down in much the same manner as a dipped headlamp. Even straining to the point of busting my nuts I'd be lucky to manage 30MPH on the commuter, so even in this configuration the light is stil far 'faster' than the bike can go. At the speed we travel a powerful high beam is utterly superfluous, even on my unlit country road commute.
 

HovR

Über Member
Location
Plymouth
I use my T6 light on medium, angled downwards. I've never been flashed. The light which reaches the motorists eyes is only as bright as that coming from their own headlights.

No need for 1800 lumens on the a road with street lamps..
In reality, it's only the emitter which is rated to 1800 lumens. In practice I doubt the light is pumping out more than 800 to 1000 lumens. Not that that isn't bright, still easily enough to dazzle if angled wrong.
 
  • Like
Reactions: gaz
OP
Matthew_T

Matthew_T

"Young and Ex-whippet"
In reality, it's only the emitter which is rated to 1800 lumens. In practice I doubt the light is pumping out more than 800 to 1000 lumens. Not that that isn't bright, still easily enough to dazzle if angled wrong.
I have had it angled just a bit high, but only so that I can see the road ahead.

TBH there is nothing stopping me angling it down when on the roads and then moving it up when on unlit paths as the rubber ring mount allows just enough movement.
I am going to combine it with my old Cateye EL340 which I will keep on high beam (equivalent to T6 on low).
 

Miquel In De Rain

No Longer Posting
No need for 1800 lumens on the a road with street lamps. If you are being flashed by cars, it is because you are dazzling / blinding them with your light. Turn the power down and angle it down, there will be enough spill for it to still be effective.

On unlit roads where 1800 lumens may be required to see ahead of you. If a car is in visible sight of you, turn the light down.
It's not 1800 lumens although it may be.

This is weird,the only time I have been flashed is in Thailand whilst cycling there.
 

ianrauk

Tattooed Beat Messiah
I sometimes wonder why cyclists have their bright lights directed at eye level. I don't think that angling the light down a bit will make you any less visible to other road users. You can always raise it up again if you are off the beaten track and away from adequate street lights so that you can see more of the road ahead.

It's very antisocial and just plain ignorant.
It doesn't take much to check that your bike lights are set correctly.
 

Berties

Fast and careful!
My moon light came with a helmet holder as I don't want to fit it to my road bike only my commuter,I used the helmet holder and was great the light shone to where I needed it ,as long as I don't look at the driver of the on coming car
 

Cyclopathic

Veteran
Location
Leicester.
It's very antisocial and just plain ignorant.
It doesn't take much to check that your bike lights are set correctly.
It's only an issue for me directly when I'm walking the dog down the Great Central Railway. Obviously it isn't a danger to shipping as it were but it is a bit irritating on the long straight when a bike approaches from miles away. The lighting down there is easily enough to see by so there is no need at all to have a really bright light aimed at head height.
As I said there are no cars so it doesn't present any danger at all and saying something seems a bit petty and precious but it is annoying nevertheless. If I was driving it would definitely be an unnecessary distraction and I think cyclists should at least be thinking about this issue and whether or not they are adding to or detracting from overall safety. Not to mention good will of course. There is no need to be pissing people off for no very good reason.
 
Top Bottom