Have I damaged by rim (wheel, inner tube)?

dac

Well-Known Member
Hi all,
After recently taking ownership of a new mountain bike I decided to put road tyres on it. Putting them on today I noticed I had the tread on the front tyre back-to-front (has disc brakes so couldn't just reverse the wheel) so I decided to do the job right and get the tyre facing the right way - omg why did I bother. I used this metal tyre remover but ended up taking three chunks out of my brand new sparkling BLACK rims so I have silver chunks showing now. That's annoying but what I'm concerned about is I was probably hacking at the inner tube during my troubles and the blue rubber wheel rim lining had worn alittle as it turned a pale blue/white colour like it does when something is worn, and it seemed to be moulded to the inner rim in one area (obviously due to rubbing), i.e. the lining just goes round the rim but in this rubbed area it is greatly contoured to the inner rim (it's dual rimmed - apparently)
1) Is the rim (wheel) knackered now due to this rubbed/worn area, and how likely is a puncture now (and my when on daily use)?
2) Any issue with the front tyre being on back-to-front?
Thanks.

Note: this thread title should read "Have I damaged MY rim (wheel, inner tube)?"
 
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Some wear on the rim lining - usually called rim tape - is normal.

You could replace it next time you remove the tyre, or you could probably leave it for years with no problem.

No problem with the tyre facing the 'wrong' way.

The tread will still grip, although there might be a tiny bit more rolling resistance.

A bicycle cannot aquaplane, so water displacement doesn't arise.

http://www.schwalbetires.com/tech_info/tire_tread
 

jazzkat

Fixed wheel fanatic.
As long as there is no rough or sharpish feel to the rim tape (the blue rubber bit) it should be ok. It's there to stop the tube chaffing on the spoke holes.
I'm not sure about the tyre being on back to front, but I doubt it will have caused a problem.
As you've found out plastic tyre levers are a good alternative to the old fashioned metal ones.

oh, beaten to it!
 
OP
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dac

Well-Known Member
Thanks for your replies. Ok, so hopefully I haven't damaged anything.
Out of interest, my rims seem to be standard 26" with a break disc. If I wanted to replace them would I:
1) Just buy rims and spokes (what I understand to be a wheelset) and put on my existing disc brake?
2) Have to buy a wheelset that includes a disc break built onto that wheelset (i.e. you cannot put on a disc onto wheel as they are fixed)?
3) Do I have to be wary of how far out from the hub the disc break is or are all wheels have the disc inline with the disc breaks themselves?

Asking this incase I have to replace them for any reason. What is the going price for a standard pair of wheelsets as when I look online they seem to be about £80 (is that standard), and my current wheels use Presta valves - if I wanted to change to use Schrader inner tubes would I have to change the rims too?

The bike I currently use is a BeOne Spirit Sport. Thanks.
 
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If you wish to replace the wheels, you need disc specific ones.

They have a six holes on which to mount the rotor.

If you remove one of your wheels, you will see how the rotor is mounted.

I would expect the bolts to be Torx - star shaped - so you would need the correct tool to remove those.

You then bolt the rotor onto the new disc specific wheels.

The mountings are all fairly standards, so everything should fit.

The new wheels will be drilled for presta or schrader valves.

If you keep your existing presta wheels, you could ream the hole out a little to make it big enough for schrader.

You might be confusing yourself with terminology.

A wheelset is a complete wheel, rim, spokes and hub.

A rim is just that, a rim.

It is unlikely to be cost effective to replace either on your bike, unless one of the wheels is broken beyond repair.
 
OP
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dac

Well-Known Member
I think the question of more concern is, why did you buy a mountain bike just to shoe it with road tyres??
That is a good question - the bike I bought was a good deal and couldn't resist. This bike is going to be a learning curve for me, and I am already learning. Another reason why I ask about the rims is because changing the tyres over yesterday was such hard work, took me ages, that rather than changing them back to mtb tyres (when I go off road) I would simply change the wheelsets - is this common practice (i.e. people having to sets of wheelsets (one set for road and the other for off-road) to avoid changing tyres over)?
 

Cyclist33

Guest
Location
Warrington
That is a good question - the bike I bought was a good deal and couldn't resist. This bike is going to be a learning curve for me, and I am already learning. Another reason why I ask about the rims is because changing the tyres over yesterday was such hard work, took me ages, that rather than changing them back to mtb tyres (when I go off road) I would simply change the wheelsets - is this common practice (i.e. people having to sets of wheelsets (one set for road and the other for off-road) to avoid changing tyres over)?
It is, though when I've tried it, I've found the gears aren't indexed properly because the wheels' alignment is different. So more hassle than benefit.

Better off getting multiple bikes!!
 

Tom B

Über Member
Location
Lancashire
It is, though when I've tried it, I've found the gears aren't indexed properly because the wheels' alignment is different. So more hassle than benefit.

Better off getting multiple bikes!!
Mountain bikes are a good start for many people just starting out or returning to cycling. They are IMX more forgiving and resilient.

Finding a good compromise on the tyre front might also be an option here depending on how off-road you class as off road, when commuting on my MTB i fitted Schwalbe Landcruisers.
http://www.schwalbe.com/gb/tour-reader/land-cruiser.html
Pump them up to 65PSI They have a domed profile with a central rib that you run along the road on at a fair old lick. If you are going off road, onto parkland, grassed areas ricky paths and shallow muddy puddles just let them down to 35PSIand they cope fine. I use them on a fleet of bikes at work and are noticeably faster than nobbleys. They area available for about £12 with the standard puncture resistance and double that for the puncture proof (ish) type.

Ive coped with them along these paths in rain, though admittedly knobbers would have been better in the letter.
P1010053web.JPG



My hybrid which I now use for commuting has something similar to this...
http://www.schwalbe.com/gb/tour-reader/marathon-plus.html
I have in the 1" wide tyre, the tread is only about 1.5mm deep on mine but it is more than adequate for canal tow-paths with gritty surfaces and dry grass. Being thin, it cuts into mud then spins.
I was riding around here
2363528_9050ad07.jpg
a few days ago without issue.


IMX it is under braking you notice problems first and if i have doubts I get a feel with the rear brake first as a skid on the rear is easy to control/correct whereas a skid at the front often, only at best lets you have some choice in the the scene of the accident.
 

Attachments

cyberknight

As long as I breathe, I attack.
If im reading it right you have nicked the black rim surface with metal tyre levers ?
If its disc brakes you have not damagd the brake surface so i think you should be able to sand the nicks down and touch up with black paint , i have also done that with metal levers and thats why i use plastic ones now.
 

Trull

Senior Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
I've found the Park Tools plastic levers to be very good. Also when changing a tyre, compress the tyre into the rim on the opposite side of the wheel to where you are working to help make some slack.
 
OP
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dac

Well-Known Member
The damage isn't detrimental to the bike or bike's performance.
It's just that it's a new bike in mint condition and I've gone and damaged (scuffed, made bobbly) the black rims which now have silver scrapes showing.
I will look to sand and spray paint black again. If the inner tube and rim tape are damaged then I have purchased spares so to replace.
Out of interest how many miles would I expect from an inner tube and road tyre (for an mtb) before they need replacing? The bike will be used only on roads at present.
 

Tom B

Über Member
Location
Lancashire
I get around 2-3 thousand miles from a rear and probably about 10 thousand miles from a front. That's on the landcruisers mentioned above.
 
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