How heavy is your commuting bike?

How much does your commuting bike weigh?

  • under 8kg

    Votes: 2 3.2%
  • 8-9kg

    Votes: 6 9.5%
  • 9-10kg

    Votes: 4 6.3%
  • 10-11kg

    Votes: 11 17.5%
  • 11-12kg

    Votes: 9 14.3%
  • 12-13kg

    Votes: 7 11.1%
  • 13-14kg

    Votes: 6 9.5%
  • 14-15kg

    Votes: 4 6.3%
  • 15-16kg

    Votes: 1 1.6%
  • over 16kg

    Votes: 13 20.6%

  • Total voters
    63
  • Poll closed .

Thursday guy

Active Member
The one I intend on buying is 13.6kg, so I wanted to know if it would be suitable for commuting about 10 miles a day with some hills as well. I suspect it is probably on the heavy side, but it does costs £150 (ex-display model from my local) which isn't a great deal compared to other bikes.

By the way, here is the bike I'm considering on buying: http://www.evanscycles.com/products/ridgeback/speed-2014-hybrid-bike-ec059645, all opinions are much welcomed
 
Last edited:

MartinQ

Veteran
With my locks, laptop, bike repair stuff, commuting gear, lunch, .. and all the other tat essential work supplies I lug around, the weight of my bike is fairly unimportant.
Looks a very good deal on the bike.
 

buggi

Bird Saviour
Location
Solihull
I've just weighed mine using the stand-on-scales-holding-bike method and its a little over 12kg. Mine is a cyclo-cross bike with schwalbe marathon tyres on it (700 x 28c). I can't get panniers on it tho, and that's something a lot of people like when choosing a commuting bike. I also have a road bike which I use for commuting but I prefer the cross bike coz its less race aggressive and more comfy. The bike I choose on the day depends on which office I'm going to, but I cycle at least 17 mile whichever bike I choose, so the one you want will be fine.
 
OP
Thursday guy

Thursday guy

Active Member
I've just weighed mine using the stand-on-scales-holding-bike method and its a little over 12kg. Mine is a cyclo-cross bike with schwalbe marathon tyres on it (700 x 28c). I can't get panniers on it tho, and that's something a lot of people like when choosing a commuting bike. I also have a road bike which I use for commuting but I prefer the cross bike coz its less race aggressive and more comfy. The bike I choose on the day depends on which office I'm going to, but I cycle at least 17 mile whichever bike I choose, so the one you want will be fine.
Just out of curiosity because I've heard this before, but what specifically makes a road bike less comfortable than a hybrid bike? (or in your case, a cyclo-cross)
 

MartinQ

Veteran
Just out of curiosity because I've heard this before, but what specifically makes a road bike less comfortable than a hybrid bike? (or in your case, a cyclo-cross)
I commuted with a hybrid for a few years and then recently changed to a "robust" road bike as I found I was enjoying commuting with my road bike in the summer months. For me, the hybrid was a bit more of a relaxed / upright position and the road a bit more aggressive. Like @buggi, I've got 28 tyres on the road bike to smooth out the bumps, especially when its dark. For me, if the Ridgeback is in your size, I'd just by it at that price and see how you get on with it. You're not going to lose any money, even if you change your mind and sell it.
 

Pat "5mph"

A kilogrammicaly challenged woman
Moderator
Location
Glasgow
Fear not, my favorite commuting bike comes in at 21kg, plus basket.
The one you are considering will do perfectly well.
 

Hacienda71

Mancunian in self imposed exile in leafy Cheshire
My preferred commuter is plastic and doesn't weigh much. I carry as little as possible so don't need to haul stuff to and from the office. Suit in the office and shirts and undies etc taken in whenever I have to drive due to appointments. Even my heavy bike is less than 10kg The only time I really ride a heavier bike is on the trails, bridleways or pootling with kids on tow paths etc. Other than that I want to travel quickly and efficiently and for me that is a full on race bike. For others I understand circumstances are different and a bike with rack and wider tyres is essential.
 

summerdays

Cycling in the sun
Location
Bristol
I think mine is 11 or 12 kg, but it's totally irrelevant when you see my bulging pannier as others have said, sometimes I can barely close it or on other days I can't actually lift it when tired!
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Do you think Ridgeback are a reliable brand?
Yes

My cambridge starts at 10kg, then I've added rack, mudguards (as the one you are considering), then add very heavy laptop, charger, clothes, shoes, beastie d lock, cable etc etc etc I reckon it would come in at 17kg...add me on top (you're short and presumably less than 90kg) and I'm glad my commute is pretty flat!
 

I like Skol

I don't think so, sonny!....
Location
Room 237
Another one here who says weight is secondary. My overriding concern with the commuter is reliability and suitability. My hybrid is loaded up with at least one bulging pannier for most commutes and sometimes two if it is a supply run day (boxes of cereals, clothes for a few days, cartons of milk, packs of Pepsi, fruit bowl, etc....). It is also tough, tough enough to give an MTB a run for its money. At the end of the day, you get there as fast as you pedal and as fast as the conditions allow but it isn't a race.
 

buggi

Bird Saviour
Location
Solihull
Just out of curiosity because I've heard this before, but what specifically makes a road bike less comfortable than a hybrid bike? (or in your case, a cyclo-cross)
Primarily the dropped handlebars, but most people ride the hoods anyway (top of bars) . The design of road bikes is to get the rider as aerodynamic as possible (hunched up) and even road bikes come either more or less race aggressive... Some are designed for speed over distance and vice versa. Eg on a Specialized Tarmac road bike (designed for speed/racing over short distance) you are more hunched up than on a Specialized Roubaix road bike (designed for racing over long distance). The Tarmac has a stiffer frame, the Roubaix has vibration dampeners in the forks. Cross bikes are designed for racing on rugged terrain so more comfortable than a road bike, the frame is less race aggressive and you can put fatter tyres on, but still have dropped handlebars. Then you get your flat barred road bike, or hybrid, which put you in even a more sitting up position, so you have a better view of the road, but still has the frame and wheels of a road bike for speed. Then you started moving towards mountain bike design. So you might get a hybrid with big wheels and front suspension, good if your commute takes in rough lanes and tow paths but can be heavier and slower to ride.
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
Do you think Ridgeback are a reliable brand?
Ridgeback are a very under-rated brand, mines an old steel frame (Tange CrMo) but the aluminium frame ones are as good but won't last as long as a steel one (lighter though). My 602 is now over 20 years old and I expect it to last at least another 20 years.
 
Top Bottom