How long after cycling does the heat rate return to normal?

Ming the Merciless

Formerly YukonBoy
Location
Inside my skull
4,000 a year is 80 miles per week.

That's a fair old whack.
It’s not, it really isn’t. It’s a low annual figure. Less than an hour per day. Anyone who commutes to work will likely exceed that by a fair margin.
 

justinmg

Regular
The reason for elevated heart rate is reasonably simple. If you have pushed hard during the ride, then there is a lactate debt, which needs paying back. The other issue that will elevate the heart rate is hydration. As you get fitter, your lactate threshold increases.

When I first started cycling, I would be sweating in bed late into the night.

Justin (cardiologist)
 

Ajax Bay

Guru
Location
East Devon
Thank you for the expert view.
But @justinmg , for a 20 year old female with an average resting HR, in the afternoon sitting at her laptop, is 106bpm 'elevated'?
NB Three hours after her cycle, which was 55km and hilly (Nottingham hilly) - doubt much lactate generated/lingering, with at least the last 5km flattish.
What answer do you reckon her doctor will offer? How about "Yes, it'll be few beats higher than 'normal' after you've had a ride. Take care to drink during your next ride and have a drink of water as soon as you get home."
Despite request, the OP has yet to share her resting HR which I think would at least quantify the 'elevation'.
 

Johnsco

Old Fettler
"Normal" heart-rate can vary enormously.
I've just checked mine sitting here plonking the keys and it's 57.
Some years ago, my doctor checked my pulse rate and it was so slow that it freaked him out.
He referred me to the local hospital for an ecg !!
The result .... Perfectly normal - Strong heart-beat - Nothing to worry about.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Thank you for the expert view.
But @justinmg , for a 20 year old female with an average resting HR, in the afternoon sitting at her laptop, is 106bpm 'elevated'?
NB Three hours after her cycle, which was 55km and hilly (Nottingham hilly) - doubt much lactate generated/lingering, with at least the last 5km flattish.
What answer do you reckon her doctor will offer? How about "Yes, it'll be few beats higher than 'normal' after you've had a ride. Take care to drink during your next ride and have a drink of water as soon as you get home."
Despite request, the OP has yet to share her resting HR which I think would at least quantify the 'elevation'.
Not sure @Anonymous1502 is in Nottingham...but London / Edinburgh? Not that it really matters ^_^
She mentioned that her resting HR has been around 80 (didn‘t mention how measured)
 

Ming the Merciless

Formerly YukonBoy
Location
Inside my skull
My pulse is fine thanks for asking.
What’s your resting pulse?
 

Lovacott

Senior Member
And, yes, 4000 miles a year is a good distance and as you've described, has helped your general fitness and condition massively. Further improvement will probably depend on you deliberately incorporating as many short intervals as possible during your commute, commensurate with road safety.
I'm kind of lucky because all of my commute is up and down rolling Devon hills so it's a couple of minutes of hard climbing followed by a little downhill rest. There are no flat sections of any great length where I can just pedal along at a nice relaxed pace. I've commuted much further in the past but my current commute is the hardest I've ever done and has brought with it the greatest health benefits.
 
Good morning,

Typically around the mid 50s about 3 months ago my resting heart rate rose to the mid 90s for a few days and dropped to the low 70s over the next three weeks in a fairly straight line and is now back in the mid 50s.

The reason for this was well understood, I had a weird crash, fractured the C5 and C6 vertebrae, the right clavicle, three ribs and had a relatively minor traumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage.

This left the body with a lot of repair work to do which required an increased blood flow.

The point that I am trying to make is that judgements or diagnosis based on heart rate requires a great deal of specific information and a great deal of knowledge of heart rates and the effects of exercise, or crashing.

Heart rate monitors and the internet have encouraged people to look at, record and worry about things that they don’t understand. :-)

For example many sites quote a statistic such as the average resting heart rate is in the range of 70-100bpm, although this may be a true stat it is misleading. The stat that a healthily resting heart rate is in the range of 55-75 is probably the one that most people are looking for.

Or that your heart rate should drop by 20bpm after a minutes rest and even the 220-age formula for maximum heart rate is still very common.

The reason being that most sites are written to sell advertising and the content is basically just cut, minor end and then paste, so you can read the same information a thousand times. But it is as right or wrong as the one original answer that spawned all the copies.

So if you want to worry and track heart rates you have a lot of reading to do and it needs to be reading original research not web sites with 200 word articles. :-(

Bye

Ian
 

Ajax Bay

Guru
Location
East Devon
Only 7 pages, not 20.
Last thread (mid October) was reporting elevated HR after hard (125km) ride so not dissimilar to this thread (except this steady 55km likely to be far less of a stress).
OP: Seek medical advice, be clear with the questions you want answered, check that those are answered (take notes) and trust and heed the advice given.
 
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Tripster

Über Member
Location
North West
Resting heart rate 55. Lung function test 125%. A good steady run it hovers around 130-140bpm and with the serious hills and higher tempo I can push it to 165-175bpm using a Suunto chest HR Monitor. Within 30 mins of returning home it back down to 80 and below resting and never stays elevated. Cycling it rarely goes above 100-110 unless pushing up a hill and then it’s much lower than running.
Everyone is different, but if you are worried then only a doctor can tell you and absolutely no one else.
For me, the speed at which my heart returns to normal is important

Edit: I am 45 so my ‘Max’ heart rate should be 220-45= 175bpm which is utter drivel as I can sprint a 5k with my heart rate hitting 175 and more for the full 5k and if it where true then my heart would pack in as just not possible to sustain max that long. My point is everyone is different and a 60 year old ultra runner has a ’max’ of 160bpm which may be fine but when he begins to train in heart rate zones of say 60% of max it will be near impossible for him to keep his heart rate below 100bpm... In reality his heart rate max is much higher due to his fitness levels and your heart rate zones may indeed be different or you may well have an issue so get it checked :okay:
 
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