Hybrid or road bike?

andrew barnett

New Member
Hello

I am looking to start cycling properly as a way to keep fit. It will always be on the road which will vary from flat to hilly terrain.

I have now been to two cycle shops - one halfords and another specialised shop near me. Halfords said to get a hybrid bike - Carrera Subway.

The specialsed store said to get a proper road bike, and weirdly also recomended a Carrera bike.

What would you guys recommend to get?

Many thanks
Andrew
 
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Deleted member 20519

Guest
If you're going to be on the roads all the time, why would you want a hybrid?

get a triban 3.
 
OP
A

andrew barnett

New Member
My thoughts were only because fo the hills - would the gearing be adequate for a adult newbie to get up a moderate hill with a road bike?
 
I'd lean towards a road bike, IMO they are more efficient, and more fun encouraging you to go that extra bit. You'll have no problem with the gears/hills if its a compact (34/50) or a tripple with a low granny gear. You can always easily and cheaply adjust your cassette if need be, IMO I would let the need for gears dictate the bike.
 

Sittingduck

Legendary Member
Location
Somewhere flat
Carreras are not bad bikes at all. That is a little over-geared for a newbie, unless you're living in the flatlands, of course. Lowest gear being 39 tooth chainring and 26 tooth rear sprocket. You're going to struggle up anything steep or long or long & steep! It's also slightly heavy (no thanks to the steel fork). I wouldn't jump straight in at that one, just yet... I think you're right to go for a road bike though. If you get a hybrid you will likely get the cycling bug and end up buying a road bike anyway in the next 6 months!
 
OP
A

andrew barnett

New Member
okay that has pointed me in a different direction - thank you for the warnings guys

what would be a sensible gear settings for a newbie as i live on the top of a hill and whichever direction i go the end of the ride will lead to a large hill with quite a steep incline to go up - so want to make sure ill be able to get up it
 

Sittingduck

Legendary Member
Location
Somewhere flat
Triple chainset (will likely be 30 - 39 - 50) or a compact double (34 - 50 chainrings), look for perhaps an 11-28 cassette or a 12-27, if you go down the compact route... I don't know if I'd be at ease with a compact that had a largest sprocket of 25t, if the hill is as you describe it. On the flip-side you have no way to avoid it and therefore should turn into a mountain goat fairly quickly!
 
Okay that has put my mind at rest a little - thank you

I have seen this bike which is int he price range i was thinking - http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/..._productId_810691_langId_-1_categoryId_165710

Its the Carrera TDF - the person in the bike shop said he would price match Halfords, so all depends if its any good?
Its a traditional double a 39/52 and if you are worried about hills, as I said before find something with a compact (34/50) or a tripple with a low granny gear. Hellfrauds bikes from all reports are good quality but their service quality varies and more often than not it seems to be negatively.
 

MrJamie

Oaf on a Bike
IMHO it would depend how steep those hills are, one mans steep isnt the same as another ;) and you havent mentioned your weight but if youre particularly heavy or plan to carry luggage/shopping it might not work out. Im not sure id be much use in a particularly hilly area with road bike gearing yet, im just too heavy for the steep bits :smile:
 

mikmurray

Regular
great thread, i'm in the same boat as the op, had a race bike a few years ago, got rid, but wanna start again, not sure hybrid or another race bike.......the more i think and read, the more its leaning towards race bike
 

Cyclist33

Guest
Location
Warrington
Okay...

1. You *can* get road bikes with a flat handlebar that are quite frequently lumped in with other hybrid types. Up to a certain price point they are not really any heavier than a drop bar bike, often have the same or similar gearing, all the above comments about swapping gears/cassettes to personal taste still apply, and shifter upgrades tend to be a lot cheaper too. They do have as many hand positions (in reality) if you add handlebar ends or butterfly bars. The ride position is more upright so less aerodynamic and inch for inch, slower. But I don't think it makes enough difference if you're not racing. It is a matter of personal preference and occasionally, medical advice, but some people want to ride flat bars and some, drops. Don't be forced one way or the other in road bike terms if it's not what suits you.

Some of the flat bar road bikes, as often called, have the same braking setups as road bikes, ie caliper brakes leaving very little clearance, so they suit the same skinny tyres. Other flat bar bikes are almost as light but will take mudguards and fatter tyres so if by some chance you *do* decide to hit the odd trail, which is by the way, a LOT of fun, you can do so without spending 100s on another bike.

Just some things to think about. Incidentally, I wouldn't bother with a Subway. Have a look at last year's Sirrus, Secteur or Allez.
 
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