Hyperdimensional water

I read the Bad Science column in Saturdays Grauniad. Very interesting. But the passage below did my head in...
On the BBC news site "crews were hopeful the 20m cubic litres of water could be held back and not breach the dam wall". And that'll be a struggle, since "cubic litres" are a nine-dimensional measuring system, so the hyperdimensional water could breach the dam in almost any one of the five other dimensions you haven't noticed yet
Ok. Litres are a measure of quantity. Cubic is just a notional way of arranging a given quantity. So what the hell is he on about? Argh!
 

marinyork

Resting in suspended Animation
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It's a play on the old square centimetres/centimetres squared joke.

Litres are a measure of volume enclosed by some 3 dimensional shape. You cube them and in dimensional analysis style you end up with nine.
 

Pete

Guest
Cubic metres, they probably meant - so the inference is, someone dictated the story to someone else maybe? Twenty million litres wouldn't be much of a reservoir: barely enough to fill a large swimming pool.

I have this vague memory from early schooldays, on first learning about 'square' anything, I was eagerly trying to square pounds and ounces (and probably: pounds, shillings and pence) and wondering why the teacher wasn't giving me any marks...
 
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Chuffy

Chuffy

Veteran
marinyork said:
It's a play on the old square centimetres/centimetres squared joke.

Litres are a measure of volume enclosed by some 3 dimensional shape. You cube them and in dimensional analysis style you end up with nine.
Oooh, me sides! ;)

I still don't get it. :biggrin:
 

Speicher

Vice Admiral
Moderator
marinyork said:
It's a play on the old square centimetres/centimetres squared joke.

Litres are a measure of volume enclosed by some 3 dimensional shape. You cube them and in dimensional analysis style you end up with nine.
If a very large cube is made up of nine smaller cubes, you end up with 27 dimensions, each of the nine cubes having three dimensions.;)
 

Abitrary

New Member
Underestimating the complexity of water is a basic mistake. About 5 years ago a company started marketing extra strong water, think it was called Blue Water. Apparently if you put a bottle of it next to a lemon, it could suck all of the acidity out of it.
 

domtyler

Über Member
Abitrary said:
Underestimating the complexity of water is a basic mistake. About 5 years ago a company started marketing extra strong water, think it was called Blue Water. Apparently if you put a bottle of it next to a lemon, it could suck all of the acidity out of it.
How long have you been a lesbian? ;)
 

Speicher

Vice Admiral
Moderator
Abitrary said:
Underestimating the complexity of water is a basic mistake. About 5 years ago a company started marketing extra strong water, think it was called Blue Water. Apparently if you put a bottle of it next to a lemon, it could suck all of the acidity out of it.
Heavy water - does anyone remember or know about that?
 
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