Is asymmetric dishing essential?

All uphill

I didn't recognise you but I knew your bike
Location
Somerset
A few months ago I replaced the rear hub on my tourer using new spokes. 2000 miles later the wheel is still true.

It was recently pointed out to me that I have given it similar dishing on each side. The tyre clears the chainstays and I have been able to adjust the brakes and mudguards to suit, but the rim is clearly off the centre line of the frame.

The person pointing out my "mistake" couldn't tell me why he thought it an issue. What do you think?
 

Ian H

I am an ancient randonneur, & I stop often for tea
Location
East Devon
Given that Mike Burrows has designed bikes (& trikes) with deliberately out-of-line wheel tracks, there's no fundamental reason why it should matter. I assume the wheel is parallel with the frame. If it handles okay, then... fine.
 
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MichaelW2

Veteran
Some frames have been built to with offsetn rear triangles to enable almost symmetrical wheels to be built. If memory serves, the Pace RC100 mtb and Orbit Gold Medal tourer + some custom frames by Tony Oliver.
 
Generally the hub used for the wheel dictates the dishing. A hub that uses a cassette needs dishing which in turn helps with the chain line.
Single speed / track hubs wheels don't need asymmetric dishing.

The tolerance for some bikes I've seen is so tight that unless the wheel is dead centred in the frame, you get tyre rubbing on the frame.
 
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Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
Not just asymetrical, one of my rear wheels has tangential spoking on the cassette side and radial spoking on the other. Presume to make it a bit stiffer.
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
Campag do that.
Mine is a mavic elite
 
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