Keeping local dialects alive.

dodgy

Legendary Member
Location
Wirral
Ellesmere Port and Neston Borough council .
I grew up in Ellesmere Port, definitely a Liverpool overspill town. Neston was a bit more bumpkin like, with maybe a touch of 17th century.
Not sure what you mean by the council, but Neston is in 'CWAC' AKA Cheshire West and Chester Council. Sorry if I got the wrong end of the stick.
 

nickyboy

Norven Mankey
Like my sister and husband in New Zealand

I’ve lived in Yorkshire (Leeds, Bradford and now North Yorkshire) for longer than my original Preston upbringing (Fulwood btw, @PK99 ). You can tell I’m northern but I’m not sure people can tell which side of the Pennines I am from any more.
I am aware that my accent changes a bit depending on who I’m talking to but it’s not something I do on purpose
You have a Yorkshire accent. Not a Leeds one, but deffo Yerksha
 

nickyboy

Norven Mankey
I've spent a fair bit of time in China. All the regions of China use the same characters but, in their local dialect/language the pronunciation is completely different. The people of Fuzhou are famous for having a dialect totally incomprehensible to any province bordering them. But the local language in Shanghai is totally different from, say, Sichuan and they cannot understand each other

Hence Mandarin or "putonghua" literally "common language". But even then the local accents are very different. A Beijing taxi driver speaks Mandarin completely differently from, say, a Guangzhou shopkeeper or a Sichuan policeman. I can manage a few of the accents, which the locals find as remarkable as a talking dog.
 

johnblack

Über Member
The next village to me, still in the same parish has a different accent, just even more countryfied than mine. Within 10 miles in all directions the accent changes a lot, might be I notice it more as a local, but it's amazing how it changes. I think it's mainly to do with where people moved from years back. Northwards a Cov. Brum twang. South, more North London, East proper Northampton, West bit less of anything really noticeable but far more mixed.
 
The next village to me, still in the same parish has a different accent, just even more countryfied than mine. Within 10 miles in all directions the accent changes a lot, might be I notice it more as a local, but it's amazing how it changes. I think it's mainly to do with where people moved from years back. Northwards a Cov. Brum twang. South, more North London, East proper Northampton, West bit less of anything really noticeable but far more mixed.
Sorry done it again. Did not mean to jump in on your post and cannot see how to change it.

Locally where I live there is an insertion of a letter A in some place names.
Ie Ardnamurachan rather than as spelled Ardnamurchan.
 

tyred

Legendary Member
Location
Ireland
I suspect it's corruption of "Guernsey".
You can still buy a genuine Guernsey jumper today (I have had one ever since I was a kid, as my Aunt lived on the island)
Guernsey Jumper history
I would have thought it came from the Gaelic word geansaí which means jumper.

https://glosbe.com/ga/en/geansaí
 

tyred

Legendary Member
Location
Ireland
It looks like the island is the same pronunciation in Gaelic
So which came first ?
Was the clothing named after the island, or the island after the clothing ?
(Guernsey I guess would have originally been in the Gaeltacht, as it right next to Brittany)
I don't know tbh.
 

bruce1530

Veteran
Location
Ayrshire
I'd be interested to know if this is replicated around the country or is it more pronounced the further north you go and the accents get stronger.
Funny that - northerners (whatever that means) might say that accents get more pronounced the further south you go.
 

classic33

Legendary Member
I went to school in Lancaster. Those from Lancaster and N had same accent. But those S like Galgate, Garstang had your classic rhotic Central Lancashire accent. We used to tease them terribly

Rhotic is where the "r" is heavily pronounced: To parrrk the carrr. Only Central Lancashire and W Country retain this essentially rural accent

Coming from somewhere influenced by Norse immigrants (my Surname is Scando) we used a lot of Norse words like clarty, beck etc. Not sure where ganzy (a jumper) came from, maybe Norse too?
http://www.manorhouse.clara.net/flamboroughmarine/ganseys.htm
 
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