KTM Revelator Sky Di2

Discussion in 'Bikes and Buying Advice - What Bike?' started by russ.will, 8 Jan 2016.

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  1. OP
    OP
    russ.will

    russ.will Slimboy Fat

    Location:
    The Fen Edge
    I had a bit of result today. I decided to buy some Stan's No-tubes sealant as the KTM came with some tubeless valves and the Schwalbe Ones are tubeless tyre. Upon pealing the tires and tube off, I found the Spline 23 wheels were already rim taped, so I stuck the valves in, the tyre mostly on, poured in the obligatory 100ml of goo and pumped them up. I didn't even have to remove the valve core and it all seated and sealed first time with virtually no mess. I even found a tiny puncture in the tyre that of course, sealed immediately.

    The moral of this lesson? Just because there are threads of doom and gloom with much gnashing of teeth about going tubeless, it ain't always like that! :becool:
     
    Last edited: 15 Feb 2016
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  2. looneylang

    looneylang New Member

    I've been thinking of one of these myself but having difficulties finding many reviews on it when I came across your thread. I believe you've had it a few weeks now and would be very interested in what you think of it now? Like yourself I wanted something different and I came across in a bikesoup review and was very taken by its looks and spec, I will need it to do century rides as well as the normal training rides, any info and advice would be great as theres not many of these machines about and no stockists in the west london area to go and have a look at them.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    russ.will

    russ.will Slimboy Fat

    Location:
    The Fen Edge
    I can only compare it with my own bikes, plus limited outings on a friends Tarmac SL4, which only really had saddle height adjusted to suit me, plus a couple of test rides in recent times.

    First off, geometry is pretty neutral and stable, certainly more so than my PX RT-58, so it's less nervous and twitchy. It doesn't feel slow to respond exactly and it does feel very stable through corners when north of 50kph, so I'd say relaxed in a positive sense. The only nasty surprises will come from the idiot on it.

    Comfort is good, with very little road buzz and the edges of bumps seem less pronounced, but it's not quite as floaty as Roubaix for instance. Mind you, I thought that felt a bit remote and devoid of feedback, but without being able to try them all on the same rubber, at the same pressures, on the same day, on the same road, this may be erroneous. Even being in a different mood could sway that judgement.

    However, I did feel the Roubaix ( and I'll admit I can't remember which one it was) didn't really hitch up it's skirts and accelerate when you stand up, with much more urgency than the alloy PX, whereas the KTM feels much more like the Tarmac which was broadly comparable as it's Ultegra throughout.

    I've mentioned the brakes which just kill everything else stone dead. Leaving aside whether you need that power, or not (and I haven't tried direct mount rim brakes) the feedback is leagues ahead of bog stock Ultegra and Rival 22. They would certainly have been very welcome in last years sodden London-Cambridge when avoiding down-hill kamikaze types diving for gaps that didn't exist...

    Likewise Di2, if you're thinking of going the whole hog; Totally not necessary, but I promise once it turns up on 105, there'll be a lot more people who won't be looking back. ;)

    Ultimately, the only impression I can offer is of the package as a whole, which is nicely balanced and really lacks for nothing, because there are no sneakey 105 cassettes, FSA BBs, KMC chains, etc. Not that there's anything wrong with those, but some of what passes for an Ultegra bike these days, are a long way short.

    Ritchey everything else is nice and my arse, which seems nondiscriminating anyway, isn't complaining about the Selle Italia SLR. Heck, it even comes with £50 tyres, rather than the £25 lookie likies most brands have to bask in the reflected glory of their top rubber. The frame is Di2/specific which makes it look very clean. Like I say - Complete.

    Bits that will change? Well the stem got chopped for one 20mm shorter, but that's a personal bike fit issue. I might change the bars (or look at double taping first) as they seem a little thin for my bunches of sausages. Other than that, I'll wait for stuff to wear out. What I will add off the back of one ride is that going tubeless added a smidge more suppleness and costs less than £20 as all you need is the snot and valves. I won't be changing back to test the rolling resistance claims, when the wind finally drops!

    Personally, I'm feeling well equipped for more weight loss and and a good few more 100km+ rides than I managed last year, which is exactly what I wanted it to do.

    Russell
     
    Last edited: 16 Feb 2016
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  4. OP
    OP
    russ.will

    russ.will Slimboy Fat

    Location:
    The Fen Edge
    PS. Googling European reviews and running through Google Translate throws up a few others, plus you can download the Feb issue of Bikes Etc where it won a group test, albeit all of the bikes had their strong points.

    Indeed, some of the German reviews are way better than a lot of what we have this side of the water - Well worth the effort on more subjects than this one alone, I'd say.
     
    Last edited: 16 Feb 2016
  5. looneylang

    looneylang New Member

    Thanks very much for your reply, I'm looking at ordering one now, just got to wait and see if there's any around to buy.
     
  6. SheilaH

    SheilaH Guru

    I've been riding one of these since September, and I love it. Like you, I was amazed by the ease with which it picks up speed. I think it is a pretty stiff frame, hence the slightly leaden feel at the back end. I think it is a superb frame, though and probably worth a wheel upgrade at some point. I slammed the stem right down to get more of a race position, and it's just right.

    Yeah, the brakes are amazing. Like you I found the travel too much, especially when you can pinch your fingers if riding on the hoods and braking. The only solution I've found is to pump a bit more fluid into the caliper, but it's not recommended by shimano.

    The di2 is great too, especially in winter with cold hands or when you know that mud and scog in the cables would ruin the shifting in one ride.

    I'm not sure about your tyre setup though. Mine was supplied with standard One tyres which I later swapped to the tubeless version which has thicker sidewalls. I'd urge caution as you might blow the tyre off your rim.
     
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  7. Andrew_P

    Andrew_P In between here and there

    I was just going to mention that, big difference between a Schwalbe One clincher and a One Tubeless. Bead thickness and strength being the main thing. I wouldn't run any clincher tubeless but I am sure I have seen forum posts where people have.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    russ.will

    russ.will Slimboy Fat

    Location:
    The Fen Edge
    Mine came with Schwalbe Pro One, which is definitely a tubeless [compatible] tyre. Indeed, Schwalbe go far as to say "its true strengths are experienced only in tubeless form".

    On the Schwalbe (UK) site I've linked to; if you go to select road tyres at the top of the page and then click 'Tubeless Easy' from the criteria at the side, I do note that the 'standard' Schwalbe One disappears, so I'm not doubting what you say. Indeed, flicking back and forth between the pages for the two, reinforces the idea that the One Pro is intended as the tubeless tyre of choice.

    Russell
     
  9. Andrew_P

    Andrew_P In between here and there

    If it doesn't have tubeless written on the tyre it is not tubeless, and the one you linked to is definitely not tubeless. Having one of those blow off the rim won't be much fun, take it from me I have had a clincher blow off the rim.. Email Schwalbe, I would bet good money that they will tell you to stick tubes in them immediately like they were designed for or to buy the proper tubeless version at twice the price.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    russ.will

    russ.will Slimboy Fat

    Location:
    The Fen Edge
    Sorry, I'm not one who courts an argument; but have you actually read the page linked to?

    The opening Pro One headline is "THE NEXT GENERATION OF TUBELESS TIRES".

    The page lists all versions of the Scwalbe Pro One as Microskin Tubeless Easy (TL-Easy) which are Schwalbe tubeless specific 'technologies'.
    There is no Pro One clincher only page.
    There is no version of the Pro One listed as requiring, or benefiting from a tube, in Schwalbes own words. You can run it with a tube and it came equipped thus.
    The website says you will only experience the Pro One at it's best run tubeless.
    The tyres I have says Microskin TL-Easy on the side.
    FLi (the importer of the bike) recommended running this specific tyre and rim combo tubeless and threw in some tubeless valves.

    Schwalbe, the importer and I are all clear this is a tubeless tyre. I 100% agree that the Schwalbe One isn't, unless you buy the tubless specific version. I can well believe earlier KTM bikes might have shipped with the vanilla One clincher and I wouldn't run that tubeless.

    FWIW, I've had a MTB tyre blow off the rim (ironically running a tube) whilst doing what passes for me going downhill (it ain't pretty) and you're 100% right, it wasn't bloody pleasant and I wouldn't risk it again through choice!

    Russell
     
  11. SheilaH

    SheilaH Guru

    Sounds like KTM have changed their spec for 2016 models, coinciding with Schwalbe also revamping the One range. I wonder if you've got the old or the new One tubeless? The new one is much lighter.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    russ.will

    russ.will Slimboy Fat

    Location:
    The Fen Edge
    I'VE GOT F***KING SCHWALBE F***KING PRO ONES!!!!! ^_^^_^^_^^_^

    To be fair, if you go to the KTM website, is is shown as coming with Schwalbe One which Schwalbe list in their Evolution/Folding line. Note - No mention of tubeless on that page, EXCEPT for the technology descriptions at the bottom of the page, where it also advises you to refer to the technical description of which technology applies. this is also exactly the spec on the FLi site, from whom I bought the bike.

    However, upon receipt, it had the Schwalbe Pro Ones already fitted, as can be clearly seen in the firt photo on page 3 and reproduced below:
    IMG_2583.JPG

    The fact that it puts the '1' logo in the middle of the name to read "Schwalbe 1 Pro One", doesn't help make things clearer, but it is exactly as shown on the Schwalbe website linked to earlier for the new for 2016, tubeless, top-of-the-line tyre. I also note that any mention of the vanilla Schwalbe One being tubeless has disappeared. It would now appear:

    Schwalbe Pro One = tubeless compatible clincher
    Schwalbe One = tubed clincher OR tubular

    What might be fuzzying the issue is that there is bound to be old stock of the 'Old' Ones, both tubed and tubeless still in circulation. Buyer beware!

    Cheers,

    Russell
     
  13. HoveHarry

    HoveHarry New Member

    Hi Russell

    Not sure if you still check this old thread but........

    I am looking to buy a KTM Revelator Sky Black and found this thread. As you say not much to read on the web. What has been your experience since the last update? Knowing what you know now would you have bought the same model etc? Any other tips, ticks or traps I should be aware of?

    Thanks in anticipation.

    Harry
     
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  14. OP
    OP
    russ.will

    russ.will Slimboy Fat

    Location:
    The Fen Edge
    Hi Harry,

    I've really had no issues at all with it. It's quick and comfortable and all of the things I changed were really more to do with fitting me, than through any innate issues with the bike.

    Running tubeless was peachy, except for the fact that I suffered more punctures than I ever did with tubes. Although they would seal, I ended up with two sets of tyres that wouldn't hold more than 60psi and anyway, they seemed to cut up quickly. That said, the 28mm ones were like floating on a magic carpet, so I may revisit tubeless again as I get lighter. I'm currently running some Challenge Strada 25mm tan-walls, with some lightweight Conti tubes and aside from feeling near as dammit as smooth, they also look like the dogs danglies - They stop the Sky Black form looking quite so, err, black, grip really well and have yet to puncture or cut after 250-300 miles.

    I changed the seat early on which was only really a comment on my 'normal for a woman' sit-bone spacing of 135mm requiring a 155mm saddle.

    Di2 is simply lovely. I know that standard Ultegra and for that matter the SRAM Rival 22 I have on another bike, aren't exactly shockers when it comes to positive shifting, but particularly in Cornwall where I found myself shifting whilst out of the seat, it's good to know that you just can't miss a shift. I think the bike had done well over 800 miles before I finally gave in and charged it through sheer paranoia.

    The only very small gripe I could have is aesthetic, in so far as I think all of the brake hoses could have been a few inches shorter and routed more cleanly at the bars, but that may have as much to do with stock Shimano hose lengths. When I finally turn it in for a service, I may pay a bit more to have them shortened and tidied.

    All in all, it's lived up to the promise of a bike that doesn't suffer any spec penny pinching and corner cutting. The finishing kit is all Ritchey WCS and the wheels are going to be expensive to improve upon - I rather like the look of the Hunt stuff as the RC23s aren't that wide. I also like that when I turn up at the LBS Tuesday night ride, nobody else has one and very few have even seen one. The downside is that you do have to get used to talking about your KTM!

    Would I buy another one? Well, there were really only two bikes that were yet to launched when I bought this that would cause me to at least have a look elsewhere now. One is the BMC Roadmachine 02 Di2 and the other is the Canyon Endurace CF SLX 8.0 Di2. Would either actually be a better bike? Who knows, but they are both more expensive although again, neither really suffers any deficit in terms of wheels and finishing kit compared to the big brands. Do I think either would have been worth waiting another 6 months plus for? No. Do I find myself giving them longing looks now they are here? No.

    I'm still a very happy bunny.

    Russell
     
  15. HoveHarry

    HoveHarry New Member

    Hi Russell

    Thanks for the fulsome reply. The bike looks and sounds great.

    I have spoken to FSI and they say that there are no 2016 models in stock and the new 2017 model wont be here 'till December. The 2017 model has a few minor mainly cosmetic changes (same frame, groupset and wheels) and a couple of hundred pounds price hike. I cant find any dealer with stocks of the 2016 model so I guess no 2016 bike with or without end of season discounts etc. So unless you want to sell the bike I need to look elsewhere (my credit card is burning a hole in my pocket and I need a bike now).

    I have seen this bike boardmanbikes.com/gb_en/products/377-slr-disc-9.4.html on sale now at Hargroves hargrovescycles.co.uk/bikes/road-bikes/boardman-elite-slr-endurance-disc-9-4-2016-road-bike.html at £2600 or the 9.8 at £4k boardmanbikes.com/gb_en/products/358-slr-9.8-disc.html What do you think? Anything else (other that two you mentioned above) in this £3-4k price range you would recommend?

    Thanks again
    Harry
     
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