Locally sourced? Show us your horror stories…

Once a Wheeler

Senior Member
This packet infers that a fishing boat left China, took the arctic route along the Russian coast to the north Atlantic, caught some haddock, chugged back to China along the Russian coast and landed its catch. This was packed into an Asda bag in a Chinese port such as Shanghai and then shipped to the UK. Was that journey in a refrigerated ship via the Suez canal, or air-freighted? No wonder the environmentalists say the Chinese fishing industry could not survive without government subsidies. Is this a Chinese attempt to get a world monopoly on ocean fishing? I prefer my haddock direct from the Atlantic, without travelling half-way round the world twice. Does anyone have any hard information on what is going on here?
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T4tomo

Guru
Which packet? - ah now showing - yes that is absolute madness - how many days since being caught before it hits the shops!!! supermarket fish is generally low quality.

My fish comes into Billingsgate having been caught off and landed in UK, and whisked up to my local market on a Saturday morning and usually eaten on Saturday tea time (if i get carried away, some might get frozen or eaten sunday)
 
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Randomnerd

Formerly known as Woodenspoons
Location
North Yorkshire
17,000 registered boats in the official fleet. Many more in the “dark fleet”. No chance of them ratifying any treaties soon. Vote with your wallet and buy Grimsby fish online. IshFish are good. Grimsby boats are the only source of sustainable haddock in UK water. Or eat other white fish like pollack, which is cheap. Last story on this I saw was here https://www.theguardian.com/environ...oats-galapagos-ecuador?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other
 

Lozz360

Über Member
Location
Oxfordshire
It does seem mad. Could it mean packed on a Chinese registered ship then off-loaded in Europe? There are Russian factory ships that catch tuna in the Pacific, process the fish and can them while they are still at sea! These factory ships stay out at sea for sometimes years at a time. The canned tuna is then transferred to smaller ships which go to port along with crew replacements.
 
OP
Once a Wheeler

Once a Wheeler

Senior Member
Could it mean packed on a Chinese registered ship then off-loaded in Europe? There are Russian factory ships that catch tuna in the Pacific, process the fish and can them while they are still at sea! These factory ships stay out at sea for sometimes years at a time. The canned tuna is then transferred to smaller ships which go to port along with crew replacements.
Thanks, Lozz360… the plot thickens.
 

CanucksTraveller

Macho Business Donkey Wrestler
Location
Hertfordshire
It does seem mad. Could it mean packed on a Chinese registered ship then off-loaded in Europe? There are Russian factory ships that catch tuna in the Pacific, process the fish and can them while they are still at sea! These factory ships stay out at sea for sometimes years at a time. The canned tuna is then transferred to smaller ships which go to port along with crew replacements.
Very true. I used to board Korean, Chinese and Russian squid jiggers in the South Atlantic for licence checks and usually they'd been at sea for many months, sometimes a year or two. They'd process the squid onboard, freeze it and transfer it across to freezer ships when they were full. The freezer / mothership would head in to a port more regularly once they were full. The living conditions on board the jiggers is dreadful... one fisherman jumped overboard so that he'd have to be "rescued" and taken ashore. You've got to be pretty desperate to do that in the South Atlantic.
 
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Eziemnaik

Über Member
Modern food supply chain for you.
Hotel I used to work for in Balearic Islands had their tomatoes imported from Poland in high summer. That was at the same time when you could buy Spanish tomatoes in Polish Lidl
 
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