Locking a Brompton

thenay

Member
Hello all,

I finally got myself a 2nd hand Brompton, loving it so far.

But today I found out that in the new workplace I won't be able to keep it indoors :/ There's a shed on site for staff to lock their bikes, but as you'd expect I'm very hesitant about locking mine, even if it may be safer than locking it on the street... but there's no way I can store it indoors.

I've seen scattered advice out there about locking Bromptons, which 95% of the time is "don't, carry it with you". Which isn't an option on this case. Apart from that, I've seen people who put a D-lock through the triangle on the frame, or through the back wheel, or fold the bike first and then lock it.

So I ask, for anyone out there in a similar situation, any tips on how to make sure the bike is secure? Do you lock it folded or unfolded?

(for the records, I have a good ol' heavy D-lock at hand)

Thanks in advance!
 
Last edited:

tribanjules

Über Member
Location
Birmingham
Fold it, shove it in a large shopping bag under your desk
 

Specialeyes

Über Member
Location
Essex
Through the little triangle under the top tube if you have absolutely no alternative - never just through anything removable. That said, if it's a shed that's only accessible to colleagues, then it's definitely safer than locking it on the street :smile:
 

u_i

Active Member
Location
Michigan
Examine the shed to figure out how the bike will need to be secured. Not only the lock needs to be secure but also any rack or post to which you will be attaching the bike. Go for top of the line Abus locks. Most likely a folding lock will be the most suitable, specifically Bordo Granit XPlus 6500. A chain lock might also be an option, but it is heavier. D-locks are klutzy as far as securing a bike and lock carrying are concerned.
 

annedonnelly

Girl from the North Country
If work is the only place you need to lock it you should be able to leave the lock there. So don't need to worry about the weight of a heavy lock.

Does no-one else at work have a desk & might be kind enough to let you stow it under their desk ?
 

alicat

Legendary Member
Location
Staffs
Do you need to ride the Brompton to work? Could you ride the bike in your pic instead - likely to be less of a target for thieves?
 

tribanjules

Über Member
Location
Birmingham
Through the little triangle under the top tube if you have absolutely no alternative - never just through anything removable. That said, if it's a shed that's only accessible to colleagues, then it's definitely safer than locking it on the street :smile:
Is that the triangle that Barry manilow sang about ?
 
OP
thenay

thenay

Member
Do you need to ride the Brompton to work? Could you ride the bike in your pic instead - likely to be less of a target for thieves?
Unfortunately not, as my commute involves trains (often with few carriages and little or no space for full sized bikes)
 
OP
thenay

thenay

Member
Thanks for the advice, I'll investigate if it's possible to leave a lock (or two) in the shed.
 
Given how hard it is to remove (usually by drilling out the bolts), locking it through the rear triangle is pretty safe.
 

Kell

Über Member
I used to put mine in 'park' mode (the rear triangle folded under) and run a cable lock through the triangle and around the frame, but now I just put hte lock through the frame.

I have to say though, mine is stored in an private underground car park at work, which is why I think a cable is fine.
 

Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
As above, get the biggest meanest D lock you can and leave the lock at work. Fold it first then lock it through the rear triangle, and also use a cable. That's what I did when faced with the same situation.

I've found that offices that permit under-desk stowage of Bromptons to be in the minority (only permitted in 1 out of 3 in my Brompton owning experience so not exactly a huge sample)
 

glocal

Active Member
Location
Manchester
Never had to lock a Brompton outside but the general advice against determined thieves is get the strongest, smallest lock and feed as much bike and immovable stand through it to reduce play and room for tools. Make access to the keyhole awkward by getting it to face away from you, or towards a rim etc.

Sooner or later, someone will try to use the bike frame as a lever to twist a D-lock until it gives. This is a popular trick and doesn't even require tools, but may damage the bike beyond repair -- it happened to one of my bikes. To try to prevent this you need a second lock that will stop rotation of the frame. A cable lock takes seconds to cut through, but a D-lock is heavy.

Ironically, these considerations made me get a Brompton that I wouldn't have to lock up outside.
 
Top Bottom