Looks like I am off the bike for a long time

Leodis

Veteran
Location
Moortown, Leeds
hey folks,
I have been off the bike mostly due to a new job but with some gravel this year but max 500 miles compared to my usual 6k, I decided to get back on it come New Year and enjoy what I always have done which is been on the bike. Late last month I thought I had pulled my groin but the pain was getting worse, I was off work as I am an IT engineer about a lot under desks and the likes but then managed to work from home up until Xmas. I had an MRI on the 20th Dec and the GP called on Monday last week to tell me it looks like Transient Osteoporosis with early signs of Avascular Necrosis plus a near full thickness tear of the acetabular labrum and referred me to a quack at the out patients and have to wait for the specialist to review my case.

So I guess it will either be a replacement hip which will need replacing after 15 years or live with it until it needs replacing, I just can't risk damaging my hip whilst on my bike, I am only 44 and planned to be working into my 70s :-(

Anyway, I started with 10 mins on Zwift yesterday, the hardest part was getting my leg over oooh matron... but it was ok for that time, so since it looks like I am trainer bound from now it seems I was thinking of flogging the gravel bike and buying either a Kickr Bike or Neo Bike :tongue: every cloud and all that.

Anyone else had these types of hip issues?
 

Slick

Veteran
No idea I'm afraid but it does sound terrible. Probably my ignorance of your condition, but if you could do the turbo, could you not do the bike?
 

Venod

Eh up
Location
Yorkshire
Not had a bad hip experience, so good look with that, I have a Neo which I bought to recover from a damaged shoulder and have been impressed with its capabilities, I found it hard to use a dumb trainer for any length of time but I manage 2 hour plus rides on the Neo, both the Neo and Kickr get good reports, unfortunatly they both also get bad reports, there are Neo facebook groups and probably Kickr groups, so do some research before deciding, a rocker plate improves comfort, there is also a rocker plate facebook group full of good ideas if you want to make your own.
 
I've had a hip replaced, although I'm far from certain what went wrong with my original joint is the same as what's wrong with yours.

On the X-ray, you could see both my hips.

The simple ball and socket joint was smooth on the good side, but the socket was all messy and ragged on the bad side - you didn't need to be a doctor to tell it was knackered.

Prior to replacement, I had to lie the bike on the ground to get my leg over (ooo-er), but turning the pedals was no different.

Replacement surgery was straightforward with a good outcome, which is usually the case.

I do have a slight limp, but that's probably because the other hip is slowly going the same way.

As regards service life, the consultant told me the latest ceramic hips look like they will last in excess of 15 years.

But unfortunately you are correct in thinking that having it done in your mid-40s will probably mean you need another at some point.

Surgeons avoid that if they can, because replacing a replacement hip is harder and there's a greater risk of a sub-optimal outcome.
 

si_c

Veteran
Location
Wirral
Sorry to hear about your hip problems, but at least you seem to be keeping a positive attitude around what is possible rather than what isn't:okay:

As far as hip replacement goes, my thinking would be that it would be better to have one done sooner and accept that you will need another in your early 60s than try to wait a few years and need one in your 70s. My thinking around this is that one of the biggest risks with any surgery is the anaesthetic followed by post operative infection. Both of these risks increase significantly with age and also post operative recovery times are lower when you are younger.

I would say that it is worth having a conversation with your consultant around the risks vs rewards of doing it sooner - if it's important to you to get out on the bike then point this out as quality of life is an important factor you should consider.
 

gbb

Legendary Member
Location
Peterborough
I think its the fear of having an off whilst outside causing more damage, the bone is very brittle and so a break would lead me to loosing my job as I would not be able to walk.
While my condition Osteo Arthritis is not the same of course, i resigned myself to less cycling for two reasons, one, it just hurts too much, my hips ache after a 10 mile ride on an ebike...not terribly but distinctly uncomfortable and always requiring pain relief....and as a result of that the second reason is i still have 5 years to work, its a lot of walking and standing and i already ache at the end of a shift so decided i really must limit the damage i might be doing by trying to fight the OA. It seems to me the sensible option, look after yourself, or rather not abuse already damaged joints.
 

Andrew_Culture

Internet Marketing bod
Sorry to hear that, especially as you're a youngun like me! I reckon I'll be working waaaaay past my 70s.

Heal fast!
 
Sorry to hear about your hip problems, but at least you seem to be keeping a positive attitude around what is possible rather than what isn't:okay:

As far as hip replacement goes, my thinking would be that it would be better to have one done sooner and accept that you will need another in your early 60s than try to wait a few years and need one in your 70s. My thinking around this is that one of the biggest risks with any surgery is the anaesthetic followed by post operative infection. Both of these risks increase significantly with age and also post operative recovery times are lower when you are younger.

I would say that it is worth having a conversation with your consultant around the risks vs rewards of doing it sooner - if it's important to you to get out on the bike then point this out as quality of life is an important factor you should consider.
My typically brusque saw bones consultant had a way with words when telling me about the risk of infection.

He said: "If that happens, you and I will get to know each other very well, and you don't want that, do you?"
 

Levo-Lon

Guru
When father in law needed a new hip about 6 years ago, old age wear and tear.
We looked at getting it done privately to speed up the operation as he was very active, early 90s but walked 5 miles every friday to visit his sister.

Cost was around 7k, which seemed good value considering the pain and loss of quality of life.
Unfortunately he fell and broke his hip so NHS, he ever really recovered from this and has steadily gone down hill since.

That aside i used to play golf with people with new hips knees even elbows.. Some were on hip 2.

Yes there's risks but life is for living so I'd be wanting maximum movement available at your age.
In 15-20 years you may not be here? Or better still technology may mean a new hip takes an hr, and your back on your feet in the afternoon :smile:.
 
Location
Leicester
<snip>

Anyway, I started with 10 mins on Zwift yesterday, the hardest part was getting my leg over oooh matron... but it was ok for that time, so since it looks like I am trainer bound from now it seems I was thinking of flogging the gravel bike and buying either a Kickr Bike or Neo Bike :tongue: every cloud and all that.

Anyone else had these types of hip issues?
Recovering from a broken hip I used the trainer a lot at first and getting on was a struggle. Used one of those step aerobic exerciser things (cheap from Decathlon) - made it a lot easier.

Good luck and all the best....
 

kingrollo

Veteran
I don't understand - you have an MRI - and a diagnosis - what treatment has been suggested ? - or do you have an orthopod apt in the future ?

Your 44 now - and a replacement hip would last until you are nearly 60 - I don't have a crystal ball, but those are quality years where you can reasonably expect good health - if you get the hip replaced ?

Come 60 - the hip would need doing again - the operation is more complicated 2nd time around - with I think a lower success rate. But in the interim you have 16 years of active life.

In my 20's I have terrible back pain - I was discouraged from steroid injections as these didn't cure the problem and may in the long run make my back worse - but against I advice I felt I had no option I was in the prime of my life and felt it was better to live those years pain free. 30 years later I have arthritis in my spine and the injections no longer work - I briefly wonder if I shouldn't have taken the injections - but then think I have a damm good 30 years - what the future holds - not so sure.....

A couple of things to consider

Don't underestimate what what physio and dedicated hip work can do - give that a try

If you want the op - you might need to push for it - a lot of GP groups are tightening the criteria for hip replacement - one such criteria I heard it that you must have had considerable pain for over a year (Great eh !!)
 

Nigelnightmare

Senior Member
The very latest replacement hips have renewable ball/socket liners which only need keyhole surgery to replace.
They are more expensive though at £11,700 but replacement liners are less than £1,000 and it's an outpatient procedure.
Not on NHS though.
 
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