My daughter learning.

Jennifer92

Regular
Hi guys, I'm currently teaching my daughter how to ride her new bike be she wants to be like her mummy, daddy and big sister who can get to do cycling as a hobby. At the moment it's not going well because she keeps falling off, she has lots of cuts/bruises on her leg and arm from when she falls off plus there have been lots of tears.

Is there anyway we can teach her without her falling off :sad:?
 

Slick

Guru
Balance bikes seem to be the way to go now.
 

netman

Über Member
I held on to the back of the saddle for my daughter and walked or trotted around with her. I could feel then when she was starting to get her balance and gradually let go whilst staying close while she got her confidence up - she was off in no time!
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
Is there anyway we can teach her without her falling off :sad:?
Not in my book there isn't. Falling off is an essential part of the learning process and coming to appreciate that falling off a bike hurts is what concentrates the mind to not fall off as quickly as possible.
It's one of life's rites of passage, and the only way to learn is the hard way. Falling off = pain, staying upright = pleasure.
I had a crash course in bike riding when I was somewhere between 3 and 4 after snapping off a stabiliser on one side. I remember taking it back to my dad expecting him to put it back on, but he simply removed the other one as well and said I'd better learn to ride a "proper" bike now! It didn't take too many spills involving removing bits of dirt from grazed hands and knees for me to realise that it was much more fun if I didn't come off. Kids were rough and tumble when I was small and getting regular grazed and bruised bits was just regarded as one of those things, and didn't get much parental sympathy!
 

Kempstonian

Has the memory of a goldfish
Location
Bedford
I held on to the back of the saddle for my daughter and walked or trotted around with her. I could feel then when she was starting to get her balance and gradually let go whilst staying close while she got her confidence up - she was off in no time!
My dad did that with me when I first learned to ride a bike. He held the saddle and walked with me. One day I said something and he never answered. When I looked he was about 100m away, having let go of the saddle without me noticing. I promptly fell off!
 

Heltor Chasca

Out-riding the Black Dog
I'd go for the grassy park approach.
This.

I taught my oldest using stabilisers. I taught my youngest using a balance bike.

The youngest is better and has had less crashes. That said, my oldest goes through stages of being like an out of control rubber band. When she was a younger teen, she would just fall over. Teens and neuro coordination is a weird phenomenon. Teens are weird.
 

Phaeton

Grumpy Old Barstool
Location
Oop North (ish)
Running along holding the saddle is the worst way. Remove the pedals, drop the saddle and let them learn to steer and balance by scooting the bike along with their feet. Very soon they will be asking you to re-fit the pedals.
Like everything else in the world there is someone that will always disagree & on this occasion it's me, balance bike didn't work for my grandson, we went the stabilisers & then running around route, the running around bit was virtually sorted one afternoon. He also made leaps & bounds once he had one of those stunt scooters.
 
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