New word needed to differentiate cyclists

Dogtrousers

Kilometre nibbler
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/apr/01/new-word-needed-to-differentiate-cyclists-says-britains-top-paralympian

The English language needs a new word to describe people who ride a bike as a form of transport rather than sport, because of the animosity towards “cyclists”, according to Britain’s greatest Paralympian, Dame Sarah Storey, a 29-time world champion in cycling and swimming

In Dutch, a “normal” cyclist is a fietser. A Tour de France-type cyclist on a racing bike is a wielrenner. English should make a similar distinction, ... We need to realise that a cyclist isn’t just a Lycra-clad yob, as per the stereotype, and that cyclists are just people on bikes moving around on a mode of transport.


I think that's a bit daft.

Because it buys into and accepts the concept of the "lycra clad yob" as if such a thing is really widespread. Because a lot of people commute wearing lycra. Because as soon as you start to look hard at the idea and come up with a clear and unambiguous definition for the word, there are so many edge cases and exceptions it starts to lose any meaning.

Lastly, because it will make me feel discriminated against: As non utility but non sport cyclist, who doesn't wear lycra I demand my own word!

Please merge if already posted. I did look but didn't find.
 

Milkfloat

An Peanut
Location
Midlands
https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/apr/01/new-word-needed-to-differentiate-cyclists-says-britains-top-paralympian

The English language needs a new word to describe people who ride a bike as a form of transport rather than sport, because of the animosity towards “cyclists”, according to Britain’s greatest Paralympian, Dame Sarah Storey, a 29-time world champion in cycling and swimming

In Dutch, a “normal” cyclist is a fietser. A Tour de France-type cyclist on a racing bike is a wielrenner. English should make a similar distinction, ... We need to realise that a cyclist isn’t just a Lycra-clad yob, as per the stereotype, and that cyclists are just people on bikes moving around on a mode of transport.


I think that's a bit daft.

Because it buys into and accepts the concept of the "lycra clad yob" as if such a thing is really widespread. Because a lot of people commute wearing lycra. Because as soon as you start to look hard at the idea and come up with a clear and unambiguous definition for the word, there are so many edge cases and exceptions it starts to lose any meaning.

Lastly, because it will make me feel discriminated against: As non utility but non sport cyclist, who doesn't wear lycra I demand my own word!

Please merge if already posted. I did look but didn't find.

I totally agree, just because you wear lycra does not make you a yob. I liked the simple 'person on a bike' to humanise things, but let's be honest the average motorist just sees us an an inconvenience.
 
As per usual I think she makes a valid point. I won’t tell anyone I’m a ‘cyclist’ anymore, because I’ve found that most people associate the term with a FPKW, HDAU, shouty, self righteous, hand wringer. I tend to tell people I like to ride a bike, that seems to invoke less instant bile spouting.
 

lane

Über Member
I ride for leisure and wear lycra but I do not need a special word to make it clear to the casual observer I am not a tdf competitor.

In seriousness there is a more clearcut differentiation in Holland the difference is easy to observe but not so much in the UK.
 

Gravity Aided

Legendary Member
Location
Land of Lincoln
In the States, we have many modifiers for cyclist, but refer to the cyclist not ordained into the lycra as a "Fred"or "Doris". This includes commuters, it seems, although commuters vary as well. Some are folks who cannot get a car,(or driver's license, because the judge won't let them, due to previous DUI or DWI conviction) and those who ride to work for health, although it probably would be healthier if we all rode away from work. Perhaps we should be either racing cyclists or volkscyclists.
 

PK99

Legendary Member
Location
SW19
In seriousness there is a more clearcut differentiation in Holland the difference is easy to observe but not so much in the UK.

Most cycle commuters I've seen in Belgium and Holland are of the pootle variety on upright bikes and are in normal clothes riding quite short distances into work as cities are smaller.

A significant proportion of London cycle commuters are lycra clad speedsters riding longer distances on their commute, hence discussions here about showering facilities etc at work. Many (see discussions on here) seem to use commuting as training.
 
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