No idea what to do about a winter bike

straas

Veteran
I've already asked in several threads and I just can't make my mind up.

I've currently got the classic electric blue 7005 alu ribble, running 105 with rim brakes - I've got full guards and can juuuust about get away with 25mm tyres.

I *think* I want something that can take wider tyres and still run full mudguards.
I'm also a fairly nervous descender - especially when I grab the brakes in the wet and barely get slowed down - so I'm thinking I need discs.

The Triban 520 looked like a good buy, and not ridiculously expensive - but then I read about the issues with the wheels and have been told by others that the mechanical discs are a bit disappointing.

So I looked to the Ribble Endurance 725 disc, I like the idea of steel - I can get it with 105 hydraulic brakes and it takes proper guards. But it's quite a lot more money, although I can offset some of this by buying through C2W which takes it to closer to £1000.

Now I've seen the latest Chris Boardman ADV 9.0 and that also looks decent, but more money!

Then I started wondering if I should keep what I have, and buy a turbo for inside for the winter?!


What do I do?!?!
 

DCLane

Found in the Yorkshire hills ...
A 'winter' bike is just a bike you don't mind getting dirty or potentially damaged due to bad weather.

My suggestion is always second-hand, that'll take mudguards and if you want disc brakes then OK. You should be able to find something that fits within a small-ish budget. I'm running a rim braked Avanti Circa that's cost about £300 with two pairs of wheels; one with road tyres and one with cross tyres.

Then use the rest for a turbo / smart turbo, and connect to Zwift or similar for when it's really bad.
 

MichaelW2

Veteran
I run Shimano mech disks and they stop like the best rim brakes, wet or dry.
If you use rim brakes in winter you just have to feather your brakes to keep rims dry. It is more of an issue for wet winter commuting where you have to respond to traffic.

In the olden days, riders would relegate a bike to winter training use when they got something better. If you are looking at low end models, check out the used market.
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
My winter steed is the same (Ribble Audax/winter frame).

I used to use clip on half mudguards, but they clogged up the brake calipers. Since retiring, haven't bothered with mudguards and run conti city contacts 28mm tyres. I notice the improvement in ride over the bumps.

99% of my rides are solo rides and being retired can choose the days I go out. I avoid really wet days and will be avoiding frosty days in the months ahead. I have a basic turbo, which I will bring out if we get extended bad weather, but for most times I just use the days in doors for rest/recovery/DIY days.

So my vote would be to get 28mm tyres, ditch the mudguards, only go out when it's dryish and forget the turbo.
Save the pennies for a summer bike upgrade.

Happy cycling
 

vickster

Legendary Member
I wouldn’t bother with 105 for a winter bike unless it’s used
Something like a used Boardman CX with discs is a good winter bike
 

MichaelW2

Veteran
My winter steed is the same (Ribble Audax/winter frame).

I used to use clip on half mudguards, but they clogged up the brake calipers. Since retiring, haven't bothered with mudguards and run conti city contacts 28mm tyres. I notice the improvement in ride over the bumps.

99% of my rides are solo rides and being retired can choose the days I go out. I avoid really wet days and will be avoiding frosty days in the months ahead. I have a basic turbo, which I will bring out if we get extended bad weather, but for most times I just use the days in doors for rest/recovery/DIY days.

So my vote would be to get 28mm tyres, ditch the mudguards, only go out when it's dryish and forget the turbo.
Save the pennies for a summer bike upgrade.

Happy cycling
On many fine winter days the road can be wet from dew or overnight rain. A winter bike without mudguards is just a bike.
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
You don't need discs - I'd get some better pads ! I've never had an issue with rim brakes in the wet. Also what levers and calipers are on the Ribble. Long Drop Shimano BR530's are excellent - I had these on my fixie commuter.
 

T4tomo

Veteran
A second hand CX bike or similar, something you can get mudguards and 28mm tyres on.

Same as DCLane above, I have 2 sets of wheels, one with 28mm road tyres and one with 35mm cross nobblies for offroad excursions.
 

Notafettler

Über Member
Look at ebay. Search locally. You would hard pushed not to find one locally. And the winter is out of season so they will be cheaper...normally. As far as i can make out all you really need is bike that will take wider tyres?
 

Notafettler

Über Member
Last edited:
OP
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straas

Veteran
I've got 105 calipers and levers and coolstop salmon pads.

When I end up with that thin film of black wetness on the rims, I find I lose a lot of stopping power. Not so bad if the whole group is on rims, but if someone in front gets a bit nervous on their discs it puts me in a pretty hairy situation. and I absolutely hate the sound of grinding rims when you've been on a sandy or gravelly lane - which seems to be most of them now.

I wouldn't consider a non mudguard winter bike, it'd just be too miserable.
 

Ridgeway

Senior Member
and I absolutely hate the sound of grinding rims when you've been on a sandy or gravelly lane - which seems to be most of them now.
don't forget that discs squeal when wet and much louder than any noise you'll ever hear from rim brakes, it's pretty horrendous but they will be stopping you as fast as you can want or your tyre grip will let you.
 
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