No idea what to do about a winter bike

Kingfisher101

Active Member
I've got the Triban RC520 and can confirm there is an issue with the stock wheels. You will have to buy a new wheelset and tyres if you want to be able to change a puncture outside. There is no issue with the brakes though, they stop the bike fine in the pouring rain.
Personally if I was your position I'd look at if there's anything suitable second hand near you or get the Voodo Limba from Halfords. The thing with secondhand is that people are still wanting a lot for them.
 

Tripster

Senior Member
Location
North West
One bike for all year use. Wash it, maintain it and it wont dissolve in winter. My Aluminium trek never did, nor has my Genesis Day one which looks immaculate, nor the MTB.
coat them with ACF50 and protects everything. Same for motorbike and thats show room condition as all of them have been.
 

Lovacott

Senior Member
don't forget that discs squeal when wet and much louder than any noise you'll ever hear from rim brakes, it's pretty horrendous but they will be stopping you as fast as you can want or your tyre grip will let you.
I've only had the squeal a couple of times and only after I have done a stretch in the wet without braking at all.

If I'm braking more regularly, I don't get the squeal.
 

T4tomo

Veteran
One bike for all year use. Wash it, maintain it and it wont dissolve in winter. My Aluminium trek never did, nor has my Genesis Day one which looks immaculate, nor the MTB.
coat them with ACF50 and protects everything. Same for motorbike and thats show room condition as all of them have been.
That's fine if you can get mudguards on your "one" bike and don't mind wearing out your potentially more expensive chain and cassette etc quicker as winter miles are harder on components than summer miles. To be fair a Genesis day one is pretty much a perfect "one" bike.

Anyway what of this one bike nonsense? N+1 is the way to go.

As i said above, one of my "n" has 2 sets of wheels so does the winter road and the light off-road /bridleway duties and can be luggaged up for light-touring. And it cost about an eight of my best bike!
 

Tripster

Senior Member
Location
North West
That's fine if you can get mudguards on your "one" bike and don't mind wearing out your potentially more expensive chain and cassette etc quicker as winter miles are harder on components than summer miles. To be fair a Genesis day one is pretty much a perfect "one" bike.

Anyway what of this one bike nonsense? N+1 is the way to go.

As i said above, one of my "n" has 2 sets of wheels so does the winter road and the light off-road /bridleway duties and can be luggaged up for light-touring. And it cost about an eight of my best bike!
My point was some people cannot afford multiple bikes and manufacturers dont make bikes that fall apart at the first sign of rain or bad weather. MTB chains and cassettes have a seriously hard time but they dont fall to pieces. Proper care and maintenance and they will last years. That was my point. My sons bike is ridden and trashed, smashed but because I maintain it the bike looks mint. Oh and a thin coating of ACF50 for winter.

oh and no mudguards on any, hate the things. Wont be mudguards on my new bike either.
 

Juan Kog

Senior Member
My geared winter bike is a 2010 Dolan preffisio with 9 speed tiagra , having compared it with a blue ribble I think its the same frame .So same tyre / mudguard problems .once I started using schwalbe Durano plus I had to settle for 23 mm . I like the look of the ribble CGR AL plenty of clearance for big comfy tyres and mudguards. Although I agree winter and new don't go together. But it's only money . At this time as there are no group rides ,no urgency to buy a new winter bike . I'll stick to using one of the fixed fleet.
 

Lovacott

Senior Member
That's fine if you can get mudguards on your "one" bike and don't mind wearing out your potentially more expensive chain and cassette etc quicker as winter miles are harder on components than summer miles.
It depends on the roads.

Roads which service agriculture are more mud covered between March and September than during the winter.

I'm not so sure that there is such a great difference between the seasons either?

February (Winter) has a lower rainfall average than any of July, August or September (Summer).

Our average rainfall level per month only deviates on average by 13 millimetres from the best and worst months.

Our monthly average minimum temperature has a standard deviation of less that 5 degrees centigrade from the average monthly minimum.

So in fairness, it seem that we live in a fairly moderate climate.

We don't live in Siberia and we don't live in the outback either.

Why would parts deteriorate so quickly between one season and another when there really isn't that much of a difference in the weather?
 

dave r

Dunking Diddy Dave Pedalling Pensioner
Fixed for winter, Genesis Flier, gears for summer, 10 speed Eastway, mudguards on both.
 

Tripster

Senior Member
Location
North West
Mudguards to keep the bike clean all year, may as well strap it to a turbo and never take it outside. Bit like the motorcyclist who sell bikes in private ads.....’ 10,000 miles, like new, never seen rain
 

faster

Senior Member
It depends on the roads.

Roads which service agriculture are more mud covered between March and September than during the winter.

I'm not so sure that there is such a great difference between the seasons either?

February (Winter) has a lower rainfall average than any of July, August or September (Summer).

Our average rainfall level per month only deviates on average by 13 millimetres from the best and worst months.

Our monthly average minimum temperature has a standard deviation of less that 5 degrees centigrade from the average monthly minimum.

So in fairness, it seem that we live in a fairly moderate climate.

We don't live in Siberia and we don't live in the outback either.

Why would parts deteriorate so quickly between one season and another when there really isn't that much of a difference in the weather?
Salt and grit.

They only spread it on the roads in winter.
 

RoadRider400

Some bloke that likes cycling alone
A 'winter' bike is just a bike you don't mind getting dirty or potentially damaged due to bad weather.

My suggestion is always second-hand, that'll take mudguards and if you want disc brakes then OK. You should be able to find something that fits within a small-ish budget. I'm running a rim braked Avanti Circa that's cost about £300 with two pairs of wheels; one with road tyres and one with cross tyres.

Then use the rest for a turbo / smart turbo, and connect to Zwift or similar for when it's really bad.
Agree with this.

My winter bike is my hybrid commuter. No carbon or hydraulic discs but a simple bike that I dont mind getting out in all conditions and only giving a quick wipe down afterwards. I dont go any great distance in winter and tend to do more offroading, so im not concerned that its significantly slower and heavier than the summer bike. The other advantage is that when I do get the summer bike out I feel so much faster.
 
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