No idea what to do about a winter bike

Lovacott

Senior Member
Salt and grit.

They only spread it on the roads in winter.
That's true, but they don't grit all roads and it's not every day that they drop grit.

A bit of a clean and a drop of oil should negate that.

I can't see why winter cycling would do more damage to a bike than summer cycling?
 
I've been cycling for 30 years - it's only in the last 5 I have had a dedicated winter bike.

It's a very nice option to have - but you can easily get by without one.

Fwiw I had an alu giant defy and now have a Ribble cgr as my winter bikes.
 

Adam4868

Guru
I had the blue Ribble Audux for years.Took it all over the place aswell.France,Ireland etc.It was also my winter bike.A few years ago someone I know was selling a Cube road bike with hydraulic disc brakes so I bought it and sold the Ribble.Have mudguards fitted and it's been a great bike for all weather's.Peronally I wouldn't ride in winter with no mudguards.
 

Adam4868

Guru
I won't ride any time of year without mudguards. UK rainfall levels don't vary that much between summer and winter.
I don't really overthink it and could ride my winter bike all year round....But I have another carbon bike that I ride aswell.I save my rides on it mostly for good weather.Its a lot lighter and no clearance for guards.Barely fit 25 tyres on it !
Thinking about what you said regards rain,got caught in a shower this morning but it seems rare I get properly soaked.I feel that heavy rain for me seems to be not to often ^_^ Must be that halo over me.
 

cougie uk

Senior Member
That's true, but they don't grit all roads and it's not every day that they drop grit.

A bit of a clean and a drop of oil should negate that.

I can't see why winter cycling would do more damage to a bike than summer cycling?
Seriously ?

I can get through a long summer ride and the bike is still clean if it was dry. Only dirt is from drops of energy drink on the frame.

In winter it's more likely to be wet and dirty. Mud on the road. Every ride now demands a proper clean.
And when it gets cold and they start to grit the roads ? You need to get that salt off your shiny components straight away.

Not to mention that winter roads are slippier. Wet, mud, leaves, ice - let your winter bike take the fall and keep the summer bike safe and sound.

Winter is just harder on a bike than summer is.
 

RoadRider400

Some bloke that likes cycling alone
With winter here, many newbies who bought a new bike in the summer have given up and selling on.
Whilst some might be, I keep a close eye on used bike prices online and there has not been a significant fall in prices since the summer. I think it might be a little bit longer before they come to the realisation that they are not going to use their impulse purchases.

I will add that I see a lot of overpriced bikes going unsold so part of the reason for prices remaining strong might be stubborn sellers. There are bargains to had by engaging in conversation with sellers and putting in the leg work, and explaining why their bike has failed to sell at the listed price for the last month.
 
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SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
I won't ride any time of year without mudguards. UK rainfall levels don't vary that much between summer and winter.
You're correct, but the difference is in the summer the spray tends to be mostly water and the ambient temperature and sun means it quickly dries out after rainfall and the ground does not become soft and boggy.
In the autumn and winter, there's less sun, lower temps and more solid crap like rotting leaves and road salt mixed in with the road spray. It takes longer to dry out and if you get multiple wet days in quick succession, then the ground can become soft and muddy for weeks or months at a time.
I will ride without mudguards in summer and winter, but only on hard ground and after checking the weather radar for any incoming wet stuff I don't want to be caught out in.
 

Tripster

Senior Member
Location
North West
Hate the increased problem of toe overlap, the rattle, the utter crap look of them. I ride my MTB and have no problem with mud or getting wet, it’s part of the fun. I try to ride any enjoy rather than look for reasons to moan. I also invested in a very nice Muc Off pressure washer and enjoy cleaning the bikes down after a ride. I live in the UK so the weather is what it is
 

faster

Senior Member
That's true, but they don't grit all roads and it's not every day that they drop grit.

A bit of a clean and a drop of oil should negate that.

I can't see why winter cycling would do more damage to a bike than summer cycling?
Whilst the salt washes off the roads fairly quickly, the grit element is pretty persistent and once they've gritted once, it's gritty for a good while. It doesn't just disappear at the end of the day.

I notice from another one of your posts that you're a mudguard user (like myself). Mudguards protect you and your bike from the worst of the grit. I have no idea how it works, but on my winter/wet bike, about 99% of the grit ends up on top of the rear mudguard and the rest of the bike stays surprisingly clean. I rarely clean it to be honest, and it looks pretty good.

Without mudguards on freshly gritted roads (pure misery), the bike looks like it has just been dug up off a beach.

Like a few others here, I've got a blue Ribble for a winter/wet bike. I absolutely love it - it's a keeper.

Shimano 5800 and up callipers are very good and I have no problem stopping all 15st of me in wet weather when breaking from the drops. Earlier Shimano callipers are basically pointless in the rain imo - this might be the OP's problem.

I'm fine with 25mm tires, and I find there is plenty of clearance as long as the rear mudguard bracket binned and instead the guard is directly zip-tied to the brake bridge.
 

T.M.H.N.E.T

Disc brakes - Stopping things since 1902
Location
Northern Ireland
I would rather crash a reasonably priced winter bike (in a season where perhaps the risk of crashing it is higher) with reasonably priced components than I would something shiny and expensive, probably light and made of space materials.

Do you need a winter bike - no... But if you want a dedicated winter machine and can afford it, then why the hell not
 
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