Nuts! Of the wheel variety. What do I need?

- Baz -

Active Member
Location
Manchester
Hi all,

Starting to commute by bike soon and have a new hybrid bike (Ridgeback) with 15mm AF wheel nuts front and rear (no quick release, sadly). The question of the inevitable puncture and removing and replacing wheels had me checking the 15mm tool (pedal spanner) that came with the bike. Not a good fit with some play. So dug out a normal 15mm spanner (Draper) and that's not a good fit either :biggrin: A 14mm spanner is too small...

Well, just replace the nuts when they get knackered, methinks. But an internet trawl for 15mm bike wheel nuts proved futile, which is a bit weird. So I'm a bit flummoxed!

Any ideas where can I find replacement wheel nuts? And what's the best spanner(s) to get to ensure that I don't chew up the nuts? Will any decent spanner from B&Q suffice?

Apologies for what must be a very basic question, but any help appreciated.

Thanks,

Baz
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
The spanner that comes with the bike is usually no better than cheese.

15mm is a reference to the outer diameter - they are nearly all a 10mm axel, although there are two thread types....

Get yourself down the local bike shop just to check. All are a 10mm axel fit generally

Most either use the more simple 'lower end bike' 15 mm nuts - low thread count, or track nuts, which use a tighter thread same as QR equipped bikes. Can you try a proper 15 mm spanner ?
 

PpPete

Guru
Location
Chandler's Ford
9/16" falls between 14mm and 15mm, although AFAIK no bikes have been made with that size A/F wheelnut in a LONG time.

By the way Draper do not make "normal" tools.... They buy in and distribute TSO's (Tool Shaped Objects) AVOID AT ALL COSTS. And I live less than 500 metres from their corporate HQ.....

Axles are usually 10mm x 1.0mm (rather than the usual M10 - which has a 1.50mm pitch) but nuts are usually 15mm IME.
 

battered

Veteran
It does *sound* like a 9/16 AF. That would make it a...erm...3/8 UNF bolt if nenory serves. A quick check is to measure the axle diam, the threaded part. If it measures 10mm, it's likely to be a metric one. If 9mm (3/8" in old money) then it ain't no metric. M9 doesn't exist, except possibly as a special somewhere.

It must be 20 years since bikes had UNF fittings. More.
 
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