Old mountain bike question

abbie

New Member
I cycle commute on a borrowed (very old and kronky) mtb and have a shiny new bike on it's way via cyclescheme.

I have been using the borrowed bike for most of my short journeys too, local shop/butchers/post office etc where there is nowhere to lock a bike to and just leaving it outside the shop windows.

I have an mountain bike of my own that is approx 15 years old. It's a bit rusty and the paint is peeling in places but seems solid enough. It's not been used for 5 years, I've replaced both tubes, lubed up the chain etc but in certain gears the chain slips really badly. To save me leaving my new bike unsecured I was thinking of using my old mtb for the short local journeys but don't want to spend a fortune on improvements.

Can anyone suggest how I can stop the chain slipping/which bits I need to replace to make it rideable? I don't know much about bike bits but would like to learn.
 

Norm

Guest
Greetings, Abbie. :ohmy:

I doubt if you'll need to replace anything, it probably just needs setting up again. There'll be a couple of screws and an adjuster on the rear gear change mechanism, if you want to try it yourself, I'm sure we can find a video to help.

Plan B would be to find a trustworthy bike shop and get it serviced. It'll probably cost £20-odd and you'll need to find a good one or they'll say everything needs changing.
 
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abbie

New Member
Just realised I forgot to say hello, how rude :ohmy:

Thanks for the helpful reply, I asked the bike shop I've purchased my new bike from and they do a basic service for £35.

Being a novice I felt like I should have a go and start getting to grips with all the parts myself though. I am a bit embarrased at how little I know about bikes components. The crank fell off my borrowed bike and I didn't even know what it was called so defo time to brush up on my knowledge and get my hands dirty.
 

Norm

Guest
The issue with the gears is possibly no more than a quick tweak of the adjuster (where the gear cable goes into the mechanism). Where are you (approximately!), we might find a local CCer who'll help you. :laugh:
 
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abbie

New Member
I'm Notts/Derby border commuting to Mansfield. Have a neighbour who might be able to help but know he'll do it for me rather than teach me if that sounds daft. I need to learn!

Is it relatively straightforward or would I be better off getting someone to do it?
 

guitarpete247

Just about surviving
Location
Leicestershire
abbie said:
but know he'll do it for me rather than teach me if that sounds daft. I need to learn.

I know exactly what you mean.

My dad is one of those, though now to old to do it himself he'd still prefer to keep his secret methods to himself (or that's what it feels like;)).
I'm a teacher and feel that we must pass on these secrets:becool:.

By the way that bicycletutor.com link from Mcshroom is one I would have recomended too.
 

Mystique

New Member
I only recently got back into cycling after about 16 years away and I found myself tinkering with my new bike in the evenings just to see what is what etc.

Since I got my bike 3 weeks ago I have replaced both tyres with M+'s and have had to adjust the the front and rear derailleurs. I have also played around and learnt how to deal with V brakes as I had never come accross those before I got my new bike.

To be honest, I was so rusty at bike maintenance that there were a few times that I needed to look on YouTube for advice vids and found them! I now feel reasonably comfy with being able to solve most potential probs that I could encounter on the roads as long as I carry my bike toolkit with me and I am far from being an expert.

Ride safe.
 

Norm

Guest
Yup, YouTube and bicycletutor are both good guides, and there is of course stuff from Sheldon Brown's site.

I've also got the Haynes book which, whilst obviously not detailed as it covers every aspect of every type of bike, acts as a guide to help you find what you should be looking for when you need more specific information about your own bike.

I also found an old MTB and an even older road bike were great places to practice and learn about maintenance, because I don't feel too nervous about stuffing something up. Since I started playing with my own bikes a year ago, I've built up several bikes for friends and I have even spent a couple of days at my LBS, helping to unpack and build bikes there. That was great fun and really informative, so I now feel pretty confident at taking on most things.
 

hotmetal

Senior Member
Location
Near Windsor
Hopefully Norm's right about the gears just needing a bit of adjustment. However, if the bike's done a lot of miles or the chain and sprockets have been neglected, then they could be worn enough to start jumping. Worth getting a trustworthy LBS to have a look over it for you though, just to make sure it's safe – if bits like the crank are falling off, you wanna be sure the brakes and wheels aren't about to follow suit. Also, if they are a trustworthy local bike shop, they'll adjust the gears if possible, rather than have you replace the whole drivetrain.
 
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abbie

New Member
The crank fell off the borrowed bike not my old bike. Although the chain came off the borrowed bike too on Sunday. Defo the borrowed one is a nail but I'm hoping my old one can be salvaged as a runabout.

Really hope my work hurries up with the c2w voucher! Thanks for all advise, I am going to have a play next weekend and hopefully get the old bike sorted.
 

taxing

Well-Known Member
This is off the point of learning about bikes, but are you sure there's nowhere to lock your bike around the shops? Railings, lampposts? After getting my C2W bike I couldn't go back to riding the rusty old borrowed one!
 
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