Oval chainrings???

Anyone have experience with oval chainrings?? I’ve come across them when shopping online and some swear that they are better because of the power in the legs aren’t consistent! Some say that they are no benefit whatsoever!!:wacko:
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
They've been around for a long time and were normalised in the nineties by Shimano with their Biopace chain sets. I've used them but can't say I noticed any difference but try them and see if you can.
 
OP
The happy cyclist
Location
Cork, Ireland
They've been around for a long time and were normalised in the nineties by Shimano with their Biopace chain sets. I've used them but can't say I noticed any difference but try them and see if you can.
Ya I might see in time there not very expensive anyway so maybe the next time I’m servicing my bike I might throw a set on and see!
 

Levo-Lon

Guru
I use them on my xc bike, i like them and i do believe they help on ups.
Feel a bit odd at first but only for a few mins, well for me anyway
 
I use them on my MTBs where smoothness of pedaling on the uphills helps with traction, especially at lower speeds. Not sure if that would translate to road bikes it's not such an issue
 

I like Skol

Hold my beer and watch this....
Been around (see what I did there :whistle:) since forever and pushed by various suppliers, including Shimano for a while in the late 80's early 90's. I think on paper, or in theory, they might make sense but in practice this probably amounts to nothing due to the way our non-machine bodies work, which likely negates all the possible advantages in the real world. If they were that effective then they would dominate the chain ring world rather than being the tiny side chapter that they have been for most of cycling history. Don't waste your money.
 
OP
The happy cyclist
Location
Cork, Ireland
Been around (see what I did there :whistle:) since forever and pushed by various suppliers, including Shimano for a while in the late 80's early 90's. I think on paper, or in theory, they might make sense but in practice this probably amounts to nothing due to the way our non-machine bodies work, which likely negates all the possible advantages in the real world. If they were that effective then they would dominate the chain ring world rather than being the tiny side chapter that they have been for most of cycling history. Don't waste your money.
Great point there
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
There are several different types of oval chainring, with the axis inclined in different positions in relation to the cranks on each, so the answer to your question will depend on which type you're eyeing up.
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
I stopped watching the video at the point where he suggested rotating the ring 180° relative to the 5-arm spider ...
Indeed,and even if one was able to do so it solves nothing as it simply puts it in phase with the other leg... but as they're intended to be in phase with each leg in turn they're bilaterally symmetrical so you'd be actually returning it to normal.
 

Pedropete

Über Member
Location
West Sussex, UK
Raced XC on Biopace in the 90s and didn't do my knees any favours. Been running a 42t Absolute Black direct-mount on my Tripster for 12 months and honestly couldn't say if it makes any difference. Looks pretty though.

To be fair, I rode a lot in my teens and 20s and developed a reasonably solid pedalling style as a result so it's possible that someone with a non-race/more relaxed entry to cycling may notice more benefit. Who knows.
 
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