Peugeot PGN10 Project

Discussion in 'Vintage and Classic Bikes' started by Edgy Dee, 27 Dec 2017.

Tags:
  1. Edgy Dee

    Edgy Dee Cranky Old Guy

    Location:
    Scotland
    What to do when you're laid up with a partially ruptured achilles? Bike curation project obviously!

    This project started after my last equipment cascade, when I realised that the workshop sweepings added up to about 90% of a bike. All I needed was a frame. I then bought two frames on Ebay (as you do - I'll be reselling the first one).

    The second frame was stripped down and sold as 'unknown', but it looked good in the pics, so I parted with £12 plus £15 postage. Turns out it's a 1984 Peugeot PGN10 US Routier in Reynolds 501. How do I know?
    1. It has the seatpost fixing bolt in the back of the seat-tube, unique to Peugeot, and only used on some models and for a few years in the mid 80s.
    2. The frame number is B 4 0677492 - apparently the first digit is the year number.
    3. Reference to the Peugeot 1984 catalogue, and the frame matches the PGN10 US Routier, right down to the traces of burgandy paint. Note the early front derailleur braze-on, and the mudguard eyelets. The cable guides have gone, presumably blasted off by the stripping process.
    http://www.bikeboompeugeot.com/Broc... UK Brochure PGN10US, PGN10, PH11, PH10LS.jpg

    The frame arrived with all the holes plugged up with some expander for protection during stripping (I left the seat tube plug on for the photo). Most of this came away fine, but the bottom bracket was plugged right into the chain stays. There is expander left in there that is never coming out!

    The objective of this project is a summer city commuter, and the curation principal is low-cost (remember the workshop sweepings), so don't expect a concours restoration. But with the raw frame weighing in at 2090 grams and the forks at 735 grams, I think it will turn out pretty respectable nonetheless.

    More to follow as the project unfolds...
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: 27 Dec 2017
    Alan O, Colin_P, johnnyb47 and 8 others like this.
  2. Hugh Manatee

    Hugh Manatee Veteran

    Great fun projects, these. I did similar once. Bought a frame and built it up with odd bits I had hanging around. It ended up having Campagnolo tub wheels, a Mavic rear mech and Shimano cranks. I had to use friction shifters but I loved it. I hope to bring it back to life once I find a set of forks to replace the ones wrecked by a careless Mercedes driver.

    Keep topping this thread up with pictures so we can see how things evolve.
     
    Colin_P and Edgy Dee like this.
  3. biggs682

    biggs682 Smile a mile bike provider

    Location:
    Northamptonshire
    @Edgy Dee that has all the makings of a great bike and as @Hugh Manatee says please keep us all updated as you go along
     
    Colin_P and Edgy Dee like this.
  4. Lancsman

    Lancsman Über Member

    @Edgy Dee That looks like a good project. I like my old Peugeots and have just taken re-ownership of my old 1986 CFX10 having bought it back from my brother. My frame has a quil seatpost and I am wondering if your frame was fitted with one when new. That aside the old peugeots build into really nice bikes
     
    Colin_P likes this.
  5. OP
    OP
    Edgy Dee

    Edgy Dee Cranky Old Guy

    Location:
    Scotland
    I share your appreciation of Peugeots @Lancsman. My 'top' bike is based on a Peugeot 653 Athena frame (see pic). The '84 PGN10 doesn't use the quill seatpost, but instead has a boss in the back of the seat tube to drive a bolt into to press against the post. I can't imagine it's very secure, and I considered the quill solution - you can manufacture one with a seatpost and quill stem parts. But I think instead I'll go for a belt-and-braces approach with a collar-clamp around the post to stop it sliding down the tube. As this is a budget build the collar clamp may actually be a hose-clip! ^_^
     

    Attached Files:

  6. DCLane

    DCLane Found in the Yorkshire hills ...

    Looks an OK start. I'm still working on a Peugeot Premiere P10NW that appeared whilst I was recuperating from an operation. Frame's done, wheels to do then it's the putting it all back together.
     
    dave r and Colin_P like this.
  7. OP
    OP
    Edgy Dee

    Edgy Dee Cranky Old Guy

    Location:
    Scotland
    Nice project @DCLane. Are you going for restoration, or update?
     
    Colin_P likes this.
  8. DCLane

    DCLane Found in the Yorkshire hills ...

    It's being tidied up with the paint chips being touched over in white pearl along with a new saddle, inner and outer cables, bar tape and wheels being re-greased.

    Otherwise not too much is needed, although I'm struggling to get one pedal off.
     
    dave r and Colin_P like this.
  9. I've always been partial to a Pug myself. Here's a couple I've done myself. Both were nothing fancy, ie: Carbolite 103, but they built into lovely bikes IMO :okay:

    Picture 1 turned into picture 2 but both finished bikes started out in a similar state.

    IMG_0750.JPG IMG_0884.JPG Side View Angled.JPG
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Edgy Dee

    Edgy Dee Cranky Old Guy

    Location:
    Scotland
    Yesterday I had my cast removed, and I'm now in a moon boot. The good news is that I can put some weight on the injured leg. I started asking the plaster room tech about rehab, but when I said I was an athlete he sort of smirked slightly. The standard NHS (hands off it!) programme says Physio from Week 5. Sports therapy is not included. Fortunately I found a good protocol online from a sports injury clinic, so I can be a bit more proactive.

    The PGN10 frame has 120mm rear spacing, and the drivetrain I have available is 8-speed, with a 130mm spacing. I could get the wheel in, but it was struggle. So I decided to cold set the frame. The approved method (sheldonbrown.com) involves a length of 2 by 4, but I had nothing suitable to hand. My solution was a bit brutal, but effective. Lay the frame down in a carpeted floor, place a size 11 over the drop-out and stay-ends, and pull gently upwards on the opposite drop-out and stay-ends. Turn the frame over repeatedly, and check progress frequently. By this method I got the spacing to a near perfect 128mm, with the wheel centring nicely on the seat-tube.

    The brakeset I have is a pair of Tektro R350 dual pivot calipers. These take a modern recessed allen head nut. But the PGN10 isn't drilled for recessed nuts, and the bolts are too short to go through the frame. One solution is to drill out the frame, but I didn't fancy that sacrilege. The other solution is to switch the front brake to the rear, where the longer bolt will go through the bridge, and replace the short bolt on the rear brake with a much longer one so that it will go through the fork. It was a painful expenditure - £8 for the bolt and £4 delivery from Spa Cycles; ouch, ouch, ouch!

    Swapping the bolt was equally painful. I started undoing the old bolt before noticing the tiny retaining grub-screw, and as a result stripped the allen key socket. I had to completely dismantle the brake, saw off the excess bolt (to reduce the amount drawn through), and remove the stub with a vice and molegrips. On the up side, I found these really nice dome-headed nuts, which will provide an elegant finishing touch.

    That's the first coat of primer applied.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: 30 Dec 2017
  11. PHL67

    PHL67 Senior Member

    Location:
    Frinton on Sea
    You have to love a vintage Peugeot as they are just nice bikes to work on and ride.

    I have a few in my collection and just purchased another one.

    I prefer paint not powder coating but that is down to preference.

    All transfers are readily available so I tend to think outside the box and make it individual if it is being kept.

    As the others have said please update with your progress.

    Many thanks. Paul.
     
    Colin_P, johnnyb47 and Edgy Dee like this.
  12. OP
    OP
    Edgy Dee

    Edgy Dee Cranky Old Guy

    Location:
    Scotland
    Thanks Paul, I'm going for red paint: I don't have a red bike; everyone should have a red bike; and red is faster, right? Also going for conventional '80s decals, so it will look a bit like the attachment. Awesome!
     

    Attached Files:

  13. Colin_P

    Colin_P Veteran

    Another one here who has recently gone through the process with a 1984 Puggle.

    A few observations...

    The deep drop "nutted" dia-compe duel pivot calipers work a treat with the period correct brake levers. I even retained the so called suicide levers on as well and with the dia-compe calipers the braking is as good as a modern roady, even using the suicides! Pricy though at £15 each, but well worth it.

    A Shimano UN55 bottom bracket dropped right in, in place of the old cup and cone setup.

    Then I went a bit oddball and fitted and mtb gear and chain set as the 52/42 - 12/24 setup was too high geared for me now. The Acera derailleurs work perfectly with the sachs huret downtube friction shifters.

    dscf6614_zpsim7yhz6e-jpg.jpg

    And my adventures doing it here...
    https://www.cyclechat.net/threads/1984-peugeot-nothing-special-equipe-modernisation-project.224294/
     
    Lancsman, Edgy Dee and PHL67 like this.
  14. OP
    OP
    Edgy Dee

    Edgy Dee Cranky Old Guy

    Location:
    Scotland
    Thanks Colin for that inspirational triumph over adversity! :okay:
     
  15. OP
    OP
    Edgy Dee

    Edgy Dee Cranky Old Guy

    Location:
    Scotland
    Week 2 in the moon boot, and down to two wedges. I can do some weight-bearing on the injured leg, and best of all, I've been able to do some light spinning on the turbo, so that's all good.

    The project has hit a snag. I started applying the first coat of colour, and it puddled all over the place. I've re-read all the instructions, and the only thing that stands out is the recommendation not to spray in cold weather. It has been a tad parky of late, particularly in my garage. So I've rubbed the frame down again, but the painting is parked until the temperature rises again a bit.

    Any other thoughts on that paint behaviour most welcome!
     

    Attached Files:

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice