Peugeot PGN10 Project

Discussion in 'Vintage and Classic Bikes' started by Edgy Dee, 27 Dec 2017.

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  1. Colin_P

    Colin_P Veteran

    That is due to contaminaton, usually silicon.

    What you need to do is wipe the whole frame down to remove every invisible trace of any contamination. I say invisible because while it may look thoroughly clean it obviously isn't. And when you wipe it down, looking at the level of contamination there there, you will need to use many cloths (kitchen roll is good) so you don't spread the contamination all over the place.

    This is what I do and would do with that bike...

    1, Wipe down with cellulose thinners (about £10 for 5 litres from a good motor factors, you'll use very little but it is a very good general purpose to cleaning non painted oily bits and will last you years). Alternatively pinch your Mrs nail varnish remover and use that...

    2, Wipe it down again with celly thinners

    3, And again

    4, Wipe it down with some stuff called "panel wipe" again from the motor factors, about £15. Alternatively get a few cans of aerosol automotive brake cleaner, these are about £3 each

    5, Panel wipe it again

    6, And again


    As for spraying in cold temps in an unheated workshop, it can be very difficult to avoid what is called "bloom", this is when atmospheric moisture condenses into the paint film as the solvents are evapourating. The solvents rapidly cool the paint as they evapourate providing the perfect conditions for the moisture to condense onto and into that cold surface. "Bloom" usually manifests itself by turning the paint white cloudy. Not a lot you can do unfortantely although you might be able to get away with heating the frame with (ironically) an electric painter stripper gun and then (from a distance) continue to dry and keep the paint warm (for up to 15-20 mins) as the solvent flashes off / the paint dries. Alternatively pinch the Mrs hairdrier....

    As for the paint itself I'd use an etch primer on the newly panel wiped steel (2 coats) then a put the top coat(s) on.

    But what I'd really do is leave the paining well alone until things warm up a bit and concentrate your effort in mocking up / trial fitting the bike, fitting everything you may need to fit to the frame and making sure it all fits and works before you damage the newly painted frame like someone I know....
     
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  2. OP
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    Edgy Dee

    Edgy Dee Cranky Old Guy

    Location:
    Scotland
    Thanks @Colin_P. I'm a bit bemused about where the contamination might have come from. That grey showing through is fresh primer. But your advice is welcome. Several wipe-downs with celly thinners, and wait for some heat. Sounds like a plan.
     
  3. PHL67

    PHL67 Senior Member

    Location:
    Frinton on Sea
    Just a thought. Have you got a water trap on air line to prevent droplets coming through.
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Edgy Dee

    Edgy Dee Cranky Old Guy

    Location:
    Scotland
    I'm using an aerosol. Shouldn't be an issue I think.
     
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  5. OP
    OP
    Edgy Dee

    Edgy Dee Cranky Old Guy

    Location:
    Scotland
    An update on this thread is well overdue! The paint job turned into a bit of a marathon, but I think we're more or less there now. It hasn't been helped by the consistently freezing temperatures. However, I'm reasonable satisfied with the result. It isn't perfect when inspected close up, but I don't think that matters. One of the reasons I didn't go down the powder coating route was because I think the finish looks too plastic-perfect for a vintage frame. Next steps will be to apply the decals and clear coat laquer. Then the assembly can finally begin!

    I fell lucky on ebay with some Ultegra 9 speed parts for my Peugeot Athena, which has freed up an Octalink chainset and bottom bracket. I was going to use an old Sugino 50/36. The Octalink is 50/34. Combined with a 12-32 8-speed cluster that will give me gears from 28 to 110 inches. Perfect range for urban commuting (see pic), and just manageable with the Claris derailleurs.

    On the achilles front; I've been walking boot and stick free for about a month now. Physiotherapy have given me stretching and strengthening exercises, and I've been gradually increasing the challenge on the bike. Currently doing a 10 mile loop with 440 feet of climbing three times a week, and getting faster each time. I've also taken up swimming once a week (as safer than running) for a cross training exercise, doing 1000 metres each time (pools are metric apparently!) Not there yet, but feeling more optimistic!
     

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  6. Colin_P

    Colin_P Veteran

    Nice work.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Edgy Dee

    Edgy Dee Cranky Old Guy

    Location:
    Scotland
    :wub::wub::wub:
     

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  8. OP
    OP
    Edgy Dee

    Edgy Dee Cranky Old Guy

    Location:
    Scotland
    Finally finished the laquer and ready to begin assembly.

    First, on the achilles front, I've been discharged by physiotherapy with a sheet of exercises for stretching and strengthening. The physio observed I have a slight tendency to overpronate, and recommended orthotic insoles. I in turn pass on the recommendation as they tend to correct your movement when walking and cycling, and reduce knee and ankle joint discomfort from misaligned stresses. An added bonus when cycling in winter is they help to keep your feet toasty warm. I've been gradually increasing both speed and distance, up to 20 mile loops now, and even bagged a couple of segment PRs (with a following wind)!

    On the bike build, I jury-rigged a headset press with a long stem bolt and some blocks of wood (see pic). The headset and octalink bottom bracket both slid in very nicely. I've also added a few more components. The seatpost was a find, with its period fluting - even if it isn't the lightest. The jubilee clip is a belt-and-braces support for the idiosyncratic set-bolt system provided by peugeot. The stem is Cinelli, and the levers Claris. The bars are Charge Bowl, and the blue colour doesn't go I know, but most of that will be covered up with bar tape. I'm going for white initially, with white cables and the white Charge Spoon saddle. I generally discount white accessories on a working bike as it looks grubby so quickly. I imagine this will change to black at some point, but at least for its first summer it will look awesome!

    But will this winter ever end!
     

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  9. PHL67

    PHL67 Senior Member

    Location:
    Frinton on Sea
    Coming along nicely. I do like a nice Peugeot.:becool::bicycle:
     
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  10. OP
    OP
    Edgy Dee

    Edgy Dee Cranky Old Guy

    Location:
    Scotland
    Snagging:

    1. You're all too kind to mention it, but that front wheel is on the wrong way around. That's why the label is in a different place in relation to the valve compared with the rear. Of course the tyre has a direction, so needs to be fitted the other way.
    2. The rear wheel has too much play. Need to repack with grease and tighten up the cones.
    3. Forgot to fit the dropout adjuster screws first anyway.
    4. The original braze-on cable guides are gone so I bought some band-on chrome ones. Offered one up, and I've got the wrong size. Had to order another set.

    Sure there will be more!
     
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  11. OP
    OP
    Edgy Dee

    Edgy Dee Cranky Old Guy

    Location:
    Scotland
    Snagging 2:
    1. Dismantled the rear axle and repacked it with grease. As I re-tightened it it did the classic slip of a worn thread. It's holding ok for now, but there's a new axle on order. Iffy rear axle prompted me to check the front. That too was a bit dry and loose. All regreased and adjusted now. Also fitted the front tyre the other way around to satisfy visual OCD.
    2. The bolts supplied with the downtube cable guide/adjusters wouldn't reach in far enough to grap the bosses. Fortunately a rummage in my odd bolts box turned up a couple that did the job without looking out of place.
    3. The through-frame bolts for the Tektro R350 brake calipers were way too long for the dome headed nuts to tighten up. Half an hour with a junior hacksaw sorted that.
    4. I have discovered (after much anguish) the technique for fitting band-on cable guides. If you try to fit them with the cable in place you will struggle to make the nut and bolt meet, and probably scratch the paint in the process (as I did). Fit the bands first with nut and bolt as loose as possible, then feed the cable through before tightening up the bolts.
    5. The chain came with a 'non-reusable' magic link. What is that about! The chain is probably going to be too long anyway, and you are going to have to remove some links. I had to remove four. I've been fitting chains since before magic links, so pretty used to the art of squeezing a rivet out just enough and no more. If I need to remove the chain the magic-link will probable go in the bin and get replaced with one of the links I removed.
    Nearly done. Just the final adjustments.
     

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  12. OP
    OP
    Edgy Dee

    Edgy Dee Cranky Old Guy

    Location:
    Scotland
    20180326_125952.jpg
    And here it is finished and in the sun where it belongs, (and a little reminder of where it all started).
    Final numbers are 12kg and about £140. But who's counting! I think its beautiful, and totally functional.
    Riding feels nicely balanced from the off. I've opted for the A520 pedals as I prefer a recessed cleat for commuting.
    I'm gonna need some silk overgloves for that bar tape :sun:.
    Bring on summer please!
     

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  13. Colin_P

    Colin_P Veteran

    Brilliant.

    I adore my old Pug, they do ride very nicely.
     
  14. buzzy-beans

    buzzy-beans Well-Known Member

    Awesome bike and I like the attitude of a bloke who basically says bollocks I will do it my way to the medics, the reason being that they aren't accustomed to someone who has to go out there and get on with life!!
     
  15. PHL67

    PHL67 Senior Member

    Location:
    Frinton on Sea
    Looks fantastic. Great job. Gotta love a Pug......
     
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