Phrases that will surely die out in the next 50 years ?

Flick of the Elbow

Wage Slave
Location
West Lothian
I assume that most of us remain familiar with phrases from the war/national service, e.g.
'in civvies'
'AWOL'
'demob happy'

(Any others ?)

Do we think that today's youngsters will still be using them in 50 years ? (Do they even know what they mean now ?)
 

Beebo

Firm and Fruity
Location
Hexleybeef
We still use phrases from Shakespeare's day with out knowing the true meaning.
Some of these will last others won't.

A phase that will die out is "I am going to tape the film tonight" and "I going to fill the car up"
 

Alex H

Guru
Location
Alnwick
I assume that most of us remain familiar with phrases from the war/national service, e.g.
'in civvies'
'AWOL'
'demob happy'

(Any others ?)

Do we think that today's youngsters will still be using them in 50 years ? (Do they even know what they mean now ?)
I'm sure as long as we have armed services then they will stay around, not too sure about 'Blighty' though
 
'in civvies'
Screen Shot 2017-07-23 at 06.56.45.jpg

Screen Shot 2017-07-23 at 06.57.03.jpg

'demob happy'
Screen Shot 2017-07-23 at 06.56.01.jpg

They all seem to be doing fine.

"I am going to tape the film tonight"
That specifically, yes, because recording something off TV is not done anymore, but I still here people in the media saying "taping" rather than "recording" - so I think that usage of tape will survive.
"I going to fill the car up"
Well, yes, if petrol disappears, so will that sentence. The phrase "fill the car" may yet survive to mean plug it in or swap out the battery.
 

Shut Up Legs

Down Under Member
"Damned lycra louts"

Well, I can dream, can't I?
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Valhalla
The basic phonemes along with the language have been recorded for over a century, with digital recording of one form or another commercially available for over 30 years now. My favourite words and phrases may drift in and out of fashion, but they'll never entirely disappear.
 

winjim

Iron pony
The War, referring in this case specifically to the second world war, until the next major war in which the British mainland comes under direct attack.
 
Top Bottom