Protect the NHS, part 2. Reduce avoidable hospital admissions.

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Cymro74

Active Member
News story this week that SAGE believes many Covid infections picked up in supermarkets. If they apply their usual logic they will order closure of all food sellers. This will reduce Covid infections to protect the NHS.
(Millions will die of starvation within weeks but anyone says so will be shutdown or fined)
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
News story this week that SAGE believes many Covid infections picked up in supermarkets.
It's stating the bleeding obvious that the coronavirus is being spread by people coming into contact with each other, isn't it? They can't pin the blame on people going to the pub now, so these "expert" idiots have to find another explanation. I'd say the biggest current cause in many areas will have been the Diwali celebrations, where the rules about intermingling were ignored completely and they all had a jolly good knees-up with enough gunpowder explosives to start WW3. Good for them too, they didn't let the miserable killjoy lockdownists spoil their fun, they just ignored them!
 

mjr

Comfy armchair to one person & a plank to the next
I'd say the biggest current cause in many areas will have been the Diwali celebrations, where the rules about intermingling were ignored completely and they all had a jolly good knees-up with enough gunpowder explosives to start WW3. Good for them too, they didn't let the miserable killjoy lockdownists spoil their fun, they just ignored them!
Meanwhile, in the real world, the Diwali celebrations in London, Birmingham, Leicester and Edinburgh all moved online.

I expect some flouted the rules and had multi-household meet-ups, but I bet more did on Bonfire Night. For some incomprehensible reason, Bonfire Night events were mostly cancelled instead of moved online and only a few switched to drive-in and a day early. The resulting meet-ups were sadly predictable.

At least for both events, they were mostly meeting outside!
 

SkipdiverJohn

Veteran
Location
London
Meanwhile, in the real world, the Diwali celebrations in London, Birmingham, Leicester and Edinburgh all moved online.
There was nothing online about the celebrations some of my neighbours were having I can assure you. The fireworks weren't virtual ones either, and they went on for days either side of the official Diwali date.. The only concession to the coronavirus was a lack of the normal Indian music, and the whole thing was more subdued than last year.
 

bladesman73

Über Member
There was nothing online about the celebrations some of my neighbours were having I can assure you. The fireworks weren't virtual ones either, and they went on for days either side of the official Diwali date.. The only concession to the coronavirus was a lack of the normal Indian music, and the whole thing was more subdued than last year.
Well down here in essex we had a problem with local chavs getting together and setting fireworks off, not just on one day of the year either. The indian community were quiet as mice.
 

Ajax Bay

Veteran
Location
East Devon
News story this week that SAGE believes many Covid infections picked up in supermarkets.
Fact check: This contains assertions that are not based on reality and reflects useless journalism/clickbait.
" Public Health England (PHE) released its analysis of the NHS’ Test and Trace app between 9 November and 15 November [during Lockdown 2].
The data showed that 128,808 people had tested positive for the virus over that period. Together, they provided 9,789 common settings that they had visited. The most frequent location they went to were supermarkets, followed by secondary schools, primary schools and hospitals.
"Explaining the data, Isabel Oliver, Director of the National Infection Service at PHE, said: “Suggestions that supermarkets are causing COVID-19 to spread are inaccurate. Common exposure data does not prove where people are contracting COVID-19.
“It simply shows where people who have tested positive have been in the days leading up to their test and it is used to help identify possible outbreaks,” she added."
It would be interesting to know what possible outbreaks have been identified from these data, since she says 'it helps'.
Should we be in the slightest surprised that a high percentage of normal people have visited a supermarket in the last week (during Lockdown 2)? Can any causative link be established between the infected person's visit to a supermarket and their source/location of infection? Not a chance. Now a Republican election rally maybe, or perhaps, meeting MPs in a non-socially distanced way.
Proportions of all common locations reported in the data:
Supermarket - 18.3%
Secondary school - 12.7%
Primary school - 10.1%
Hospital - 3.6%
Care home - 2.8%
College - 2.4%
Warehouse - 2.2%
Nursery preschool - 1.8%
Pub or bar - 1.6%
Hospitality - 1.5%
University - 1.4%
 
I can assure you that someone does give a toss as you put it , but yes i also see many folk going about daily life as though all is well in the world. with no regard for their own or anyone elses wellbeing.
 

Cymro74

Active Member
I no longer trust the NHS or government to deliver. Historically, most British nationalised services have destroyed themselves through self-interest, inefficiency, centralisation, inability to change and failure to deliver services. NHS has gone the same way.
It is certainly not the envy of the world, and is definitely not value for money. However the NHS is treated like a religion so we are unlikely to see any change - it will stumble from one disaster to the next until the UK credit rating falls to a point where can no longer afford the debt which pays for it.
 
and is definitely not value for money.
suppose you ended up in hospital and they saved your life , would you still not consider it value for money , in terms of what you have personally paid through taxes or whatever, i certainly would ,...... maybe i am not seeing things as clearly as others due to recent events at home
 
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newfhouse

Regressive elitist lefty

Kingfisher101

Active Member
It’s such a huge organisation that it will inevitably be a mixed bag, but overall it is seen as pretty good when compared internationally. What makes you say that it isn’t good value?

This is worth a read.
https://www.nuffieldtrust.org.uk/research/the-nhs-at-70-how-good-is-the-nhs
Good value? I know people who have been left to die basically and people who have waited absolutely years before they get their routine operations. I personally think there needs to be a massive overhaul through either really upping NI contributions or introducing private health insurances. People think they will get a good service if they become ill but its often not the case. Obviously if people are not in work e.g on benefits, very low waged etc then they should be exempt from paying. It was bad even before the current crisis.
 
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classic33

Legendary Member
Good value? I know people who have been left to die basically and people who have waited absolutely years before they get their routine operations. I personally think there needs to be a massive overhaul through either really upping NI contributions or introducing private health insurances. People think they will get a good service if they become ill but its often not the case. Obviously if people are not in work e.g on benefits, very low waged etc then they should be exempt from paying. It was bad even before the current crisis.
I place the blame squarely on the shoulders of those* who suggest/have suggested and had implemented "cost saving" schemes before moving off elsewhere. But they seldom get to be seen. When one did make an appearance whilst I was in, they got some very simple questions put to them in front of the press. They didn't answer, nor did they stay long on the ward. They'd to pass me going back out.

*They leave medical staff with more work to do, but less to do it with(time and equipment wise).

Edited to add
The problem with private medical insurance is they decide what conditions will be covered, not you. If it's not covered, where do you go?

I've yet to see a private A&E department. Judging on the number waiting to be seen on Thursday this week, it must be an untapped goldmine. That or it's left well alone by the private sector for some other reason(s).
 
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