Rear derailleur adjuster spring....(gears jumping on smaller cogs)

Rooster1

I was right about that saddle
Can I assume that the spring that is housed in the rear derailleur barrel adjuster actually helps with the cable tension.
I lost the damn thing whilst replacing the cable!
Basically, my smaller cogs are jumping, despite adjustments (two evenings after two rides)

And, what does the (B-Tension) screw do that pushes against the frame actually do - it never seems to make much difference however I adjust it.
Perhaps the Shift Shock mentioned in the manual is what I am getting where it jumps gears
https://si.shimano.com/pdfs/dm/DM-RD0003-09-ENG.pdf

Shimano 11 speed tiagra btw
 

Chris S

Guru
Location
Sparkhill
The chain was jumping on my single speed. The sprocket was worn and it's tips weren't going through the chain far enough. It's possible that you have the same problem. Compare how far the tips of your smaller cogs go through the chain against the bigger ones.
 
Can I assume that the spring that is housed in the rear derailleur barrel adjuster actually helps with the cable tension.
I lost the damn thing whilst replacing the cable!
Basically, my smaller cogs are jumping, despite adjustments (two evenings after two rides)

And, what does the (B-Tension) screw do that pushes against the frame actually do - it never seems to make much difference however I adjust it.
Perhaps the Shift Shock mentioned in the manual is what I am getting where it jumps gears
https://si.shimano.com/pdfs/dm/DM-RD0003-09-ENG.pdf

Shimano 11 speed tiagra btw
The spring holds the adjuster barrel into its indents, preventing it from moving. Without the spring the derailleur will struggle to hold its adjustment. You need the spring, unless you have another adjuster somewhere in-line, in which case you can screw that on all the way in and make your adjustments elsewhere. The 'b' adjust sets the height of the top jockey wheel AKA the gap to the bottom of the sprocket. Too close and the chain will be squished between the jockey and the sprocket. Too big a gap and the derailleur will struggle to influence the chain. The advice for derailleur adjustment remains the same as it's always been: 'Don't fark with it if you don't know what it does'. Because derailleurs don't belong in spokes. Because goolies don't like being squished on top tubes.
 
OP
OP
Rooster1

Rooster1

I was right about that saddle
The spring holds the adjuster barrel into its indents, preventing it from moving. Without the spring the derailleur will struggle to hold its adjustment. You need the spring, unless you have another adjuster somewhere in-line, in which case you can screw that on all the way in and make your adjustments elsewhere. The 'b' adjust sets the height of the top jockey wheel AKA the gap to the bottom of the sprocket. Too close and the chain will be squished between the jockey and the sprocket. Too big a gap and the derailleur will struggle to influence the chain. The advice for derailleur adjustment remains the same as it's always been: 'Don't fark with it if you don't know what it does'. Because derailleurs don't belong in spokes. Because goolies don't like being squished on top tubes.
SO GOOD TO SEE YOU BACK and thank you, Unless you are not Mickle of the Method Variety
 
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