Recommendations for a 160 kg guy

pitchris

Member
Location
Essex
Hi there

I've checked out a few of the seemingly relevant threads on here before signing up, but either the advice appeared slightly conflicting or the posts were a few years out of date.

I'm trying to lose weight. I've lost over 2st through walking but have now hit the inevitable plateau.

As I live by the sea I thought it would be good to get a bike. I looked at Halfords - after the local cycle shop appeared to think I was a tyre kicker - and was told my best bet was the Carrera Crossfire 3 L.

Today I received an email saying they were back in stock but before ordering I thought I would return to the shop to check.

They said the maximum weight was 18st, while checking again via the website I was told it was 10st. !!!

I'm 6' 3" and weigh 24 stone 7lbs / 160 kg - though it's (very) slowly coming down - any advice on a decent bike would be most welcome.
 

si_c

Guru
Location
Wirral
I wouldn't worry about the weight limits particularly, but that bike does have a few compromises that I wouldn't be happy with personally - not least of which is the heavy suspension paired with a 700c road bike wheel type.

I'd suggest something like the Subway 1 or Subway 2 - they have smaller wheels but much larger tyres, which will work better with your weight. I was much the same weight (23ish st and 6'5") as you when I started riding to lose weight and get fitter and used a MTB which was broadly similar to those bikes.

In terms of bike durability the wheels are the bits that take the most punishment, but they are easily serviceable and repairable by a local bike shop, and the 27.5" wheels and tyres do tend to be really durable and are the standard now for most mountain bikes.
 

Scotty55

Senior Member
Location
Uddingston
You might be as well getting the Halfords one as an intro to cycling. Give yourself a target weight and a promise to buy a better bike when you hit your target (doesn't need to be your final target weight, just something to aim for at the moment).

I have read somewhere on here that trail riding / mountain biking needs a higher level of fitness than road cycling. I don't know whether that is true, but it seems to work for me - I lost a reasonable amount of weight last year doing trails rather than roads, then did a spell of mostly roads and found the trails harder work than they'd been before.
 

Fab Foodie

hanging-on in quiet desperation ...
Congrats on wanting to start cycling and congrats on trying to lose weight.
Use the bike to make lifestyle changes, the bike will help a bit with the calories, make you fitter and feel good, but the best way to lose weight is to change what and how-much you shove in yer cake-hole...
 
OP
pitchris

pitchris

Member
Location
Essex
Many thanks for the responses.

When I began my fitness regime in May 2019 it was on the advice of my doctor, and other than walking I also changed my approach to food.

I soon lost 4 stone, but during lockdown I put almost 2 stone back on.

I used to cycle when I was younger, indeed, and in 1985 I ran the London Marathon. After that I used to run half marathons almost every second week.

Then I stopped running (half) marathons and started eating them - the chocolate bar that became Snickers. That combined with middle-age spread, a partner who was a good cook and a sedentary occupation took their toll.

I vow that once I get the bike I will ride it... I've stuck to the walking, getting up at 06:30 almost every morning in all weathers.

However, I don't want to buy a bike and sit on it only for it to collapse beneath me... that would be the stuff of nightmares. Nor do I want the saddle - they look so small in the pictures - to disappear where the sun doesn't shine.

I must admit, the people I've met in the local cycle shop and Halford have not been at all helpful.
 

shep

Veteran
Location
Wolverhampton
Congrats on wanting to start cycling and congrats on trying to lose weight.
Use the bike to make lifestyle changes, the bike will help a bit with the calories, make you fitter and feel good, but the best way to lose weight is to change what and how-much you shove in yer cake-hole...
So what sort of bike do you suggest then?
 

Sittingduck

Legendary Member
Location
Somewhere flat
The 10st limit on the website is BS. You will be able to use most bikes, the challenge may be rear wheels or more specifically, spokes going ping.
I started on a Halfords £90 MTB that had been lying around for a couple of years and the best advice I was given was to change to slick tyres for the road and inflate to a decent pressure. Check the tyre side walls for tolerances.

I soon got a hybrid then before you know what is happening you have road bikes and all sorts. :rolleyes:
There are definitely a different set of challenges for larger rides, especially starting off but don't let anybody put you off.

Fad Foodie's advice is sound - I was riding 100 mile rides in the early years and still really big - only when I really took the food issue into control did I drop much off but it sounds like you are already starting on that front. The good news is that if you begin heavy, when you are lighter you will probably have a good engine already. If you drop significant weight off you may surprise yourself how strong a rider you may become.

Best tip I can give is, set a goal but if/when you reach that goal you must find another motivation to keep the weight off in the longer term, this is where I failed badly and it's no fun going back to the start after it creeping up on you as you gradually go back up the weight range. But that's for another day and might not apply to you.

Good luck!

By the way - hills.. don't avoid them forever, get wide range gearing and spin, doesn't matter how slowly you are moving of if you stop, next time you will be ready for it.
 
Last edited:

Sterlo

Early Retirement Planning
Location
East Yorkshire
If the weight limit was 10st, there'd only be kids riding them. Well done for losing some, here's hoping you get down to what you want...and have some fun whilst you're doing it.
 
Hi there

I've checked out a few of the seemingly relevant threads on here before signing up, but either the advice appeared slightly conflicting or the posts were a few years out of date.

I'm trying to lose weight. I've lost over 2st through walking but have now hit the inevitable plateau.

As I live by the sea I thought it would be good to get a bike. I looked at Halfords - after the local cycle shop appeared to think I was a tyre kicker - and was told my best bet was the Carrera Crossfire 3 L.

Today I received an email saying they were back in stock but before ordering I thought I would return to the shop to check.

They said the maximum weight was 18st, while checking again via the website I was told it was 10st. !!!

I'm 6' 3" and weigh 24 stone 7lbs / 160 kg - though it's (very) slowly coming down - any advice on a decent bike would be most welcome.
https://www.hoodmwr.com/best-bikes-for-big-guys/
 

HMS_Dave

Grand Old Lady
Location
Midlands
I was about your weight when i started. I had a cheap second hand chinese fat bike. Very wide wheels and 26 inches makes them tough. Had no issues with it. It was a boat anchor in weight but never broke and i still use it today. I personally wouldn't recommend spending much money and look at the second hand market.
 
The weight limit is a nominal figure with no real world meaning. It depends how you ride. If you chuck yourself over every trail bump and kerb and land like a sack of potatoes, the bike may break. If you learn to be responsive and absorb shock with your arms and legs as well as suspension the safety margin is much higher.
42mm tyres are fine but fatter ones will add even more shock absorption. You dont need to go to smaller wheels. Check that the L is L enough. Do you need XL.

Wheel build an spoke tension is always the weak spot. You need ***36 spoke*** wheels, nothing less. I count 32 spokes in the website photo.
If you get a wheel mechanic to " pre stress" and tune the spoke tension they will be much stronger.
 

Ming the Merciless

There is no mercy
Location
Inside my skull
I’d say get a mtn bike. Smaller wheels are inherently stronger. A bike that can take wider tyres will also help deal with your current weight. Also the higher the spoke count the better. Well done on deciding to take up cycling.
 
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