Removing Excess Links From New KMC Chain With Tool

woodbine

Well-Known Member
Location
Bristol, UK
I need to remove about 6 links from a new KMC chain. Which side of the chain do I push on with the tool to force the pin out. Smooth side of pipe or dimpled?

Thanks for any advice.
 

kingrollo

Veteran
I need to remove about 6 links from a new KMC chain. Which side of the chain do I push on with the tool to force the pin out. Smooth side of pipe or dimpled?

Thanks for any advice.
I did this for the first time a few weeks back. I didn't recall a dilemma about which way to place the tool. So it was either blindingly obvious or not an issue. Sure they would be a vid on you tube (can't link from phone)
 

Noodle Legs

Powered by cake and caffeine........
There are many videos on this so give them a look, but I’d say it’s fairly obvious once you put chain and tool together. The pin you wish to remove sits in the groove of the tool which allows the punch screw to travel all the way through and drive it out.
Going on a slight tangent, I also found that my particular chain tool also serves as a handy valve core tool! :becool::laugh:
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
If you need to take 6 links out, experiment first by just removing a couple. Then you less likely to damage the plates on the final end links.
Good luck.

PS also experiment with the discarded links on rejoining links. I know you should use a quick link, but if you ever get stranded on the road and you lose the quick link, it will get you home.
 
OP
woodbine

woodbine

Well-Known Member
Location
Bristol, UK
Thanks for all your replies. Couple more questions. How do I prepare the new KMC chain. Presumably it comes with a film of oil/grease on it? Do I remove this? If yes, what do I use, WD40, petrol, etc? If I don't remove the film, do I just use the new chain with the film on it, and use usual oil later when it dries out?
 

Rowano

Well-Known Member
Location
Edinburgh
If you're not experienced at shortening chains, take less out than you think you need to, to start with. I wish I had followed my own advice :laugh:
I left the chain as it was, cleaned up my gears to get rid of old muck before putting chain on and off I went
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
Don’t remove the grease on it, oil it when it starts to go dry.
 

silva

Well-Known Member
Location
Belgium
Don’t remove the grease on it, oil it when it starts to go dry.
Last replacement I mounted a greased chain (kinda white substance) and didn't oil it.
After the first rain rust spots, forcing me to oil it nevertheless.
The white substance became a smurr that I wiped off now and then, until nothing left.
So next time I'm gonna oil it directly after mounting.
 

Pale Rider

Legendary Member
PS also experiment with the discarded links on rejoining links. I know you should use a quick link, but if you ever get stranded on the road and you lose the quick link, it will get you home
It is worth knowing how to join a chain the 'old fashioned' way.

Several years ago I did it to @StuAff's chain on an Isle of Wight night ride.

It is still my finest bike fettling hour - or however long it took me.
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
It is worth knowing how to join a chain the 'old fashioned' way.

Several years ago I did it to @StuAff's chain on an Isle of Wight night ride.

It is still my finest bike fettling hour - or however long it took me.
Must admit that up to a few years ago, I always joined chains using the "Old" method. Never had a problem with up to 9 speed chains. It was only when I had a failure with a 10 speed that it convinced me to use a quick link for 10 speeds. Will still use the old method on my SS (1/8th).
 
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