Riding With No Hands

Sam Kennedy

New Member
Location
Newcastle
I've just started to practice riding with no hands, and I'm not finding it too difficult, however, it feels like my centre of balance is always shifted too far to one side of the bike, so it feels a little bit more awkward than it needs to be.

Any tips or advice on riding comfortably with no hands? Is it actually possible to get your centre of balance aligned with the bikes?
 

Moodyman

Guru
Never bothered trying so can't advise you. I guess you just need to practice.

I've always viewed no hands riding as more of a party trick than something that aids the riding
 

gaz

Cycle Camera TV
Location
South Croydon
I've just started to practice riding with no hands, and I'm not finding it too difficult, however, it feels like my centre of balance is always shifted too far to one side of the bike, so it feels a little bit more awkward than it needs to be.

Any tips or advice on riding comfortably with no hands? Is it actually possible to get your centre of balance aligned with the bikes?
Is your saddle skew?

If your trying to do it with a cross wind, then it will feel weird. You want to let the bike balance rather than you. If you start changing the bikes balance, you will turn.
 

dragon72

Guru
Location
Mexico City
I think it's a bit more useful than just a party trick. It's handy to be able to make adjustments to clothes, helmet etc or unwrap food with both hands while on the move.
I used to be able to do it easily when I was a kid but can't now, so I'm trying to re-teach myself. As far as I can tell it's all about confidence. If I'm tentative about it, I tend to wobble. The more blasé I am, the steadier it is.
 

Rob3rt

Man or Moose!
Location
Manchester
Sit straight upright and get your weight back, and the bike, if correctly set up and well made (i.e properly aligned frame) then it should just keep itself right.
 

gavintc

Guru
Location
Southsea
I find that the bike has to be going at a reasonable speed to achieve a confident balance to do something that will take more than just a few seconds. As others have stated sit upright and pedal naturally, A nice flat surface without potholes makes a good learning area. I find it useful to do things like take arm warmers off, open an energy bar, put on a gilet etc. Useful if you are pushing alone in a group and you do not want to stop.
 

Riverman

Über Member
I think it's a bit more useful than just a party trick. It's handy to be able to make adjustments to clothes, helmet etc or unwrap food with both hands while on the move.
I used to be able to do it easily when I was a kid but can't now, so I'm trying to re-teach myself. As far as I can tell it's all about confidence. If I'm tentative about it, I tend to wobble. The more blasé I am, the steadier it is.
Not nice when you hit a big pothole though.
 
Comes with practice, use your hind quarters to move the saddle to balance, keep pedalling, it's harder at low speeds.

I find it useful for adjusting clothes, wiping hands and face of sweat, reaching into jersey pockets and of course, celebrating a new 10 mile time :smile:
 
I don't know what it is but I have a mental block when I come to do it. It feels easy enough at first but I just cant remove my hands completely; the furthest I can go is just having the pinky on the stem. It would be useful if I could manage it make eating on the move a lot easier and would enable me to put on/ take off the gilet etc on the move also.
 

dragon72

Guru
Location
Mexico City
It would be useful if I could manage it make eating on the move a lot easier and would enable me to put on/ take off the gilet etc on the move also.

Not to mention pointing to your sponsor's logo, kissing your crucifix and/or wedding ring, firing a finger-thumb-pistol or pretending to make a mobile phone call at the end of your ride.
 
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