Road Bike Help

Noobie1983

Regular
Hi all, im new to the biking world so ill apologise in advance if my message is off
Basically i want to get back into shape, so bike to work, always loved the idea of those long scenic weekends biking, so thought 'get into shape and get a new long term hobby too'
So the last few weeks been looking at road bikes, bit of research etc
Ive decided on the Boardman SLR 8.9c Road Bike
https://www.halfords.com/cycling/bikes/road-bikes/boardman-slr-8-9c-road-bike-grey
Ive read the reviews and theyre all great
So, now to my issue. I went into Halfords today to buy, he asked me what id be using it for, i said to commute to work with, but also good rides on a Saturday leading to long rides for weekends etc. he said you dont want this for commutes, due to the roads, punctures, strains on wrists and arms etc (basically i dont have a clue but took him at his word). he said for commutes i need a hybrid, but for weekends away id want a road bike like the Boardman. So i just thought, im not buying 2 bikes, or even just 1 to either a- bike to work with but not use for a hobby, or b- just use it on saturday rides building up to long rides.
So, is he correct in what he says?
Cant i use the one like ive attached for work AND weekends? Id be using bike tracks to work etc.
Really sorry for the long message, but really would appreciate some advice on this
Thanks
 

Spiderweb

Not So Special One
Location
North Yorkshire
Of course you can use it for both but there are more suitable ‘commuting’ bikes that will take bigger tyres, more suited for the tracks you mentioned and have mounting points and clearance for mudguards and mounts for panniers if required.
 

Ming the Merciless

There is no mercy
Location
Inside my skull
It won't take mudguards and can't see rack mounts. So not ideal as a commuter but people do commute on these style bikes. Link doesn't say what max width tyres can be fitted but to improve rough roads you want wider tyres at lower pressures. Of course the roads you commute on may be fine, not every road out there is left over from the late (meteoroid) bombardment.
 

Cycleops

Guru
Location
Accra, Ghana
It's a bit difficult for you to judge what is or isn't suitable or what you'll enjoy riding as you're starting off cold as it were. You've got nothing to judge different bikes by.
The Boardman you linked is a lovely bike but is built more for speed not commuting for instance, the narrow tyres will transmit every lump and bump in the road but will feel quick. How will you find that? You won't be able to put mudguards on and there are no eyes for a rack. You can get what they call an "adventure" bike with bigger tyres and a more relaxed eg. more upright position. Or you could go with a flat bar hybrid again with fatter tyres and even more upright stance. Without spending any time on these options it's a bit difficult to decide.
If you can at least spend some time on these it will help you to find which sort you prefer. Cycle Republic would be a good place to try as suggested. Boardman is a Halfords/Cycle Republic own brand.
Also have a look at Decathlon if one is near as they offer excellent vfm bikes and lifetime frame warranty plus one year on components.
Good luck.
 

cyberknight

As long as I breathe, I attack.
You can commute on it but as said above its not ideal but not for the reasons the sales person listed .
I have the boardman team carbon which is basically the same bike apart from the newer frame design on that and its my weekend bike , for commuting i will either use my old alloy boardman or my self built rat bike .
Dont get me wrong i love my boardman but if you have an off its easier to get an alloy frame repaired than carbon , if you dent an alloy frame its normally still ok but carbon can have hidden stress fractures which is something to consider if your commuting all year around
If i was buying new and wanted a bike for commuting/ weekend rides i would be looking at something with disc brakes for better all around braking in any weather and rack / mudgaurd points .
This springs to mind ....
https://www.decathlon.co.uk/triban-rc-520-disc-road-bike-navy-105-id_8554421.html
big_1538071.jpg
 

cyberknight

As long as I breathe, I attack.
Maybe have a look at the bikes marketed as gravel/adventure which provide the flexibility for commuting as well as being perfect for rubbish UK road rides.

Eg https://www.halfords.com/cycling/bikes/adventure-bikes/boardman-adv-8-9-mens-adventure-bike

Another thing, Halfords don't enable test rides, while their bike specific Cycle Republic stores do if one is close
TMN to you :smile:
 

Drago

Flouncing Nobber
Location
Poshshire
It all depends how fit and dedicated you are. A hybrid might he a more comfortable, better all round commuting option, but if you want to ride a road bike there's no inherent reason you can't. You'll get to work quicker!

I used to commute on a sportive bike, a slightly softer road bike, but still a quick machine, and to my mind that was a far better commuting bike than a hybrid, which is too compromised in both weight and speed foe my tastes, and I'm no Badly Wiggles.
 

Nebulous

Veteran
Location
Aberdeen
How far is your commute? What is the route like?

If you intend doing a shortish commute over good surfaces and have an alternative in wet weather then it would be fine. Around 75% of the bikes in our bike shed are drop bar bikes. A lot of people there do half and half, we have an inner city office with expensive parking and they drive to the outskirts, sometimes park n ride, park for nothing then cycle the last 3 to 4 miles.

A hardcore commuter doing 5 or 6 miles plus everyday will want a rack, good lights and mudguards. That can be either hybrid or dropbar.

I have a cyclo-cross bike fully kitted out for a very short 1.5 mile commute, but I do it every day I'm in the office and occasionally will do up to 10 or so work miles, where I have to turn up somewhere else looking presentable. I do all of it in work clothes, except for a waterproof cycling jacket and overshoes.

Many people on here won't regard the idea of more than one bike as silly, but you start with one intending to do it all and then build on it. I'd say decide what is more important to you, the hobby leisure cycling or commuting and orientate your buy more towards that.
I travelled a similar road almost 10 years ago, and it has been life changing.
 
OP
OP
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Noobie1983

Regular
Morning all, thanks so much for your input and feedback!!!
Been looking this morning at gravel/adventure bikes as they do seem to be the best fit for what i want.
I am being stubborn and picky (which i guess is a good thing with spending alot of money) so im looking for a carbon frame one. I do like the idea of having that as a base, and over time as i learn i can upgrade various aspects of it, brakes, wheels etc.
 
Morning all, thanks so much for your input and feedback!!!
Been looking this morning at gravel/adventure bikes as they do seem to be the best fit for what i want.
I am being stubborn and picky (which i guess is a good thing with spending alot of money) so im looking for a carbon frame one. I do like the idea of having that as a base, and over time as i learn i can upgrade various aspects of it, brakes, wheels etc.
Yep I suppose if you can't afford a decent Steel framed bike then Carbon is the next best alternative.
 

vickster

Legendary Member
Morning all, thanks so much for your input and feedback!!!
Been looking this morning at gravel/adventure bikes as they do seem to be the best fit for what i want.
I am being stubborn and picky (which i guess is a good thing with spending alot of money) so im looking for a carbon frame one. I do like the idea of having that as a base, and over time as i learn i can upgrade various aspects of it, brakes, wheels etc.
Many carbon frames won’t take proper mudguards nor can you fix a rack

What do you think carbon will do for you that aluminium or steel won’t?

Planet X offer carbon gravel bikes if that’s essential, So do Ribble. Or Merlin
 
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