Roscoff To Santander

Daddyk68

Regular
Location
South Hams
Evening All
Can Anyone recommend a free Route planner App for I phone
I’m planning on doing a solo cycle trip & getting the ferry to Roscoff then hopefully ending up in Santander (Barring any Mishaps )So I need a decent Route planner
Any advice would be much appreciated
 

Pat "5mph"

A kilogrammicaly challenged woman
Moderator
Location
Glasgow
Hi @Daddyk68.
Sorry, can't answer your question because I don't use Iphones, but I found this route by chance, maybe it can help.
 
Evening All
Can Anyone recommend a free Route planner App for I phone
I’m planning on doing a solo cycle trip & getting the ferry to Roscoff then hopefully ending up in Santander (Barring any Mishaps )So I need a decent Route planner
Any advice would be much appreciated
I'm afraid I don't use an Iphone anymore, so can't recommend an iphone specific app.

If you want "Free" then Osmand is the way to go, though on such a long trip you may need to pay for the maps as you'll likely use up your free allocations.
It's not the most user-friendly, but once you get the hang of it it's excellent.

Other alternatives are Komoot, RideWithGps, but you'll need either to buy maps or pay a subscription.

On the plus side, unless you're very nervous, you really don't need an app.
Roscoff to Biarritz is the Velodyssey route with excellent signage the whole way. There's a detailed website with loads of info.
Just follow the signs, then when you see it, keep the sea on your right the whole way and you will end up in Santander.
I did it a few years ago. No problem and I'm as navigationally challenged as they come :smile:

On a tangent, I find it helpful to think of planning a route as a separate activity to following a route.
For pure planning https://Cycle.travel/map is the king as far as I'm concerned.
For following I prefer the advantages of a dedicated gps rather than a phone. Personal preference.

It's a great route! Enjoy!
 
OP
Daddyk68

Daddyk68

Regular
Location
South Hams
I'm afraid I don't use an Iphone anymore, so can't recommend an iphone specific app.

If you want "Free" then Osmand is the way to go, though on such a long trip you may need to pay for the maps as you'll likely use up your free allocations.
It's not the most user-friendly, but once you get the hang of it it's excellent.

Other alternatives are Komoot, RideWithGps, but you'll need either to buy maps or pay a subscription.

On the plus side, unless you're very nervous, you really don't need an app.
Roscoff to Biarritz is the Velodyssey route with excellent signage the whole way. There's a detailed website with loads of info.
Just follow the signs, then when you see it, keep the sea on your right the whole way and you will end up in Santander.
I did it a few years ago. No problem and I'm as navigationally challenged as they come :smile:

On a tangent, I find it helpful to think of planning a route as a separate activity to following a route.
For pure planning https://Cycle.travel/map is the king as far as I'm concerned.
For following I prefer the advantages of a dedicated gps rather than a phone. Personal preference.

It's a great route! Enjoy!
Morning & Thanks For The Advice I’ve Been Battling Depression For Years Now & This Is Going To Be A Hell Of A challenge Both Mentally & Physically But Were Only Here Once
 

jay clock

Massive member
Location
Hampshire UK
If you are really keen on fully electronic you have a couple of options using Ridewithgps.com

Spend ages planning route on the site. Then use a good size Garmin.. Or if you have enough battery pay for the Rwgps subscription and follow the routes in offline mode on the iPhone

Unless you are lucky you are likely to have diversions or detours which makes a laptop very useful indeed
 
The Velodyssey website has gps downloads (as well as the option of making your own) here https://www.cycling-lavelodyssee.com/practical-info/the-gps-tracklog

That website used to be fantastic! But they have upgraded it..... cue French joke here.

With all respect to @jay clock I wouldn't see a need for toting a computer for navigation on this route. It's pretty well signposted (not perfect!) and there are no shortage of tourist info offices (when they're open) to pick up local maps along the way. But if that's your thing and it gets you on the road then do it!

No matter what solution you decide to follow, it's a good idea to get some practise at home first on familiar roads. Test things like battery life, what happens when you go off route, what's it like in the rain/sun etc.

Out of necessity, I developed the theory that while I may not know where I am I am not lost! :smile: Feeling lost only arises when I have to be a certain place for a certain time - and I have no idea how to get there. So, I simply reduce those situations as much as possible. Carrying a tent means that I can always find a place to sleep. An emergency stash of food means that I won't starve.

A long trip like you are planning is only long in the planning. The day to day of getting up and moving on to somewhere new, finding food, drink and a place to rest is incredibly simple and therapeutic. The miles look after themselves.
I like to stop and appreciate the places I find along the way. They may not be famous, or the top tourist places, but they are places that speak to me on some level. They are very rarely the places I might pick out in advance.

One thing to bear in mind on a long trip is the amount of time alone. Some people are fine with that and never feel lonely, while for others the loneliness can be brutal. Even a few words of the local lingo can open doors and the most important bit of kit to pack is a big smile - it will open most doors.
If you like to read, a kindle is a great bit of kit. Carry all the books you want with minimal weight.

If I may.... perhaps something to consider is stretching your journey to include the Camino de Santiago?
Traditionally a religious pilgrimage, although nowadays, it is less religious, but could be described as "Spiritual".
Basically, thousands of people crossing different routes in Spain, all converging on Santiago de Compostela, mainly on foot, but also doable on a bike. Wonderful people to be met, interesting accommodations, the opportunity to share a journey with strangers all carrying their own burdens. Best of all, almost impossible to get lost! :smile:
I did it after the Velodyssey and enjoyed the experience. I don't view it as a bike tour, but a very interesting experience. For me, the value was not in the religion or the spirituality, but in the Humanity. All is there to see and experience. Some good, some not so good. And history! So much history!

Best of luck on your tour!
 

mike chadwick

Astrobike
Hi
Great ride I did st malo to Santander last year just a few pointers .when You get to Santander you can catch
A ferry over to somo saves cycling through Santander.
There is also a ferry across the garon estuary saves having to trek in land.
I also caught a ferry over Loire to to save the hell which is the bridge at st nazerine.
Mike
 

jay clock

Massive member
Location
Hampshire UK
Hi
Great ride I did st malo to Santander last year just a few pointers .when You get to Santander you can catch
A ferry over to somo saves cycling through Santander.
There is also a ferry across the garon estuary saves having to trek in land.
I also caught a ferry over Loire to to save the hell which is the bridge at st nazerine.
Mike
+1 for the ferry across the Garonne from Royan to Le Verdon/Soulac. However I have to disagree re the St Nazaire Bridge which I did and had no problem at all. see here https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/page/?o=2sf&page_id=302220&v=BO
 

Audax

New Member
Hi Daddyk68,
Just wondering how you got on. Basically I am in a very similar situation to you lets say, and am arranging my own trip(s?) here and there, but was still inspired by your own. Would be keen to know how it went for you.
 
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