Saddle Position

CharlesF

Guru
Location
Glasgow
I have found, since starting a longer commute, that I slide forward on the saddle. I constantly have to move my sit bones back onto the broad rear end as this gives the best pedalling position.

What should I do to remain in the right position on the saddle?
 

Davidc

Guru
Location
Somerset UK
Tilt the front up!
 

bauldbairn

New Member
Location
Falkirk
Have you tried moving the saddle forward to compensate?

To be honest I'm having the same problems as you just now - but I've just bought a new bike and I'm constantly messing around with the bar height/seat height/seat angle/seat position(forward/back) to find a compromise for longer ride comfort.
 

Davidc

Guru
Location
Somerset UK
I'm not being totally frivolous. I bought a new saddle 18 monts ago, and being leather it was incredibly smooth. I had to tilt it up a bit for a while until it got some grip in order not to keep sliding forwards.

Its now as tundragumski suggests - level, but some people find a permanent tilt comfortable
 

e-rider

crappy member
Location
South West
bauldbairn said:
Have you tried moving the saddle forward to compensate?

To be honest I'm having the same problems as you just now - but I've just bought a new bike and I'm constantly messing around with the bar height/seat height/seat angle/seat position(forward/back) to find a compromise for longer ride comfort.
The first post stated that he was more comfortable back on the saddle but kept 'falling' forward - that is different to moving forward because it is more comfortable. In the latter case you will probably benefit from moving the saddle forward. Although it might be because you have the saddle too high or the handlebars too low or too far forward.

Riders with short femurs tend to not like the saddle back too far and often benefit from in-line seatposts.
 

Moodyman

Guru
I've just bought a new bike and I'm constantly messing around with the bar height/seat height/seat angle/seat position(forward/back)

I know the feeling. Took me between 6-8 weeks to get the saddle perfect on my new bike. Then my brother, when I wasn't there, borrowed it one weekend and adjusted the saddle to his fit. I had to start all over gain, bugger.
 

MartinC

Über Member
Location
Cheltenham
Most people need to have the saddle flat, tilting it up or down to correct some other problem isn't a good idea. You should get the setback on the saddle right first.

Surprisingly if you have the saddle too far forward the tendency is for you to slide further forward. Moving it backwards is probably the best way to stop this.

Ideally you should google around and find one of the bike fit calculators and work out a good starting position then tweak this with experience. There will be lots of folks who can suggest urls for these.
 

bauldbairn

New Member
Location
Falkirk
Moodyman said:
I know the feeling. Took me between 6-8 weeks to get the saddle perfect on my new bike. Then my brother, when I wasn't there, borrowed it one weekend and adjusted the saddle to his fit. I had to start all over gain, bugger.
Ah! But you still love him. :smile:
 
OP
C

CharlesF

Guru
Location
Glasgow
Thanks for all the advice, I will check once back home (away on business at present). My bike is a Ridgeback Flight and I'm pretty sure the saddle can't be tipped up or down; but I can move it forward a bit to try.
 

ChrisKH

Veteran
Location
Essex
CharlesF said:
Thanks for all the advice, I will check once back home (away on business at present). My bike is a Ridgeback Flight and I'm pretty sure the saddle can't be tipped up or down; but I can move it forward a bit to try.
Most saddles can be tipped one way or the other. I can't remember the last time I saw one that didn't.
 

RecordAceFromNew

Swinging Member
Location
West London
As ChrisKH said it is practically certain that you can adjust the tilt of the saddle. The bolt head you need to loosen to adjust it is the same one that you need to slide the saddle forward and backward, and is under the clamp that holds the saddle to the seatpost. The whole clamp can rotate around a knurled base to allow adjustment of the tilt when the bolt is loose enough.
 

jimboalee

New Member
Location
Solihull
tundragumski said:
The first post stated that he was more comfortable back on the saddle but kept 'falling' forward - that is different to moving forward because it is more comfortable. In the latter case you will probably benefit from moving the saddle forward. Although it might be because you have the saddle too high or the handlebars too low or too far forward.

Riders with short femurs tend to not like the saddle back too far and often benefit from in-line seatposts.
Riders with short femurs have bought a frame with a seat angle too shallow.
 
OP
C

CharlesF

Guru
Location
Glasgow
Thanks to Record and Chris for putting me straight on being able to tilt thd saddle. Can't wait to get home Friday to experiment.
 
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