Seized Pedal.

nmfeb70

Active Member
Location
Tonypandy, Wales
Hi all, any ideas on how to remove a seized pedal? I've twisted allen keys, rounded spanners and taken the skin off my hands trying. It's a hexagonal shape and I think it may be Halfords' own brand.
I know there's a lesson here (always grease the threads) but all I need to know is if it's possible to shift because if not I'm probably looking at a new crank set. For what it's worth, here's a photo. Thanks.
 

Attachments

All uphill

I didn't recognise you but I knew your bike
Location
Somerset
Which way are you trying to turn it?

Non-drive side is left hand thread...
 

Venod

Eh up
Location
Yorkshire
Do you want to save the pedal ?

I had a Shimano 540 that only has an Allen key fitting in the end of the axle that had rounded off, I took the crank off the bike and stripped the platform and bearings off the pedal then put the crank in a vice and used Stillsons to remove the axle, the pedal was scrap but the crank is still in use today.
 

Pikey

Waiting for the turbo to kick in...
Location
Wiltshire
Can you soak it in penetrating oil for an hour or so?
Failing that, strip the pedal back to the axle and heat the axle with a blowtorch or the like, not so that it is red hot or will damage the crank, let it cool a little then try. The latter has worked on several bolts on my old Landrover that first drove me to feel like going to counselling when I saw their state and realised that I needed to remove them.
 

Cycleops

Legendary Member
Location
Accra, Ghana
Halfords pedal or no they’re haven’t put grease on the thread when installing. I’ve never had a pedal I couldn’t shift I’ve just rescued two bikes that had been outside for at least four years with no trace of grease, both came off with some persuasion.
First thing is to get the front wheel off so the crank is close to the ground so the other crank can stop the other turning and the chainwheel also on the ground, Support it on wood if you like, if you leave it on it’s tyres your energy is absorbed. Engage your spanner and hit it with a lump hammer, hard.
 

Badger_Boom

Well-Known Member
Location
York
Halfords pedal or no they’re haven’t put grease on the thread when installing. I’ve never had a pedal I couldn’t shift I’ve just rescued two bikes that had been outside for at least four years with no trace of grease, both came off with some persuasion.
First thing is to get the front wheel off so the crank is close to the ground so the other crank can stop the other turning and the chainwheel also on the ground, Support it on wood if you like, if you leave it on it’s tyres your energy is absorbed. Engage your spanner and hit it with a lump hammer, hard.
You could also try it with the bike upside down (or in a work stand) and put a screwdriver through the chainwheel so it locks against the seat-post tube or chainstays (you might want to protect the paint with a bit of cloth). Then use a spanner on the pedal, and a long socket extension bar with a socket large enough to fit over the ring end of the spanner - apply lots of extra leverage and encouraging language to taste. This worked on a recalcitrant pedal on my partner's latest aquisition.
 
OP
nmfeb70

nmfeb70

Active Member
Location
Tonypandy, Wales
Do you want to save the pedal ?

I had a Shimano 540 that only has an Allen key fitting in the end of the axle that had rounded off, I took the crank off the bike and stripped the platform and bearings off the pedal then put the crank in a vice and used Stillsons to remove the axle, the pedal was scrap but the crank is still in use today.
[/QUOTE

I think that may be the only way.👍
 
OP
nmfeb70

nmfeb70

Active Member
Location
Tonypandy, Wales
You could also try it with the bike upside down (or in a work stand) and put a screwdriver through the chainwheel so it locks against the seat-post tube or chainstays (you might want to protect the paint with a bit of cloth). Then use a spanner on the pedal, and a long socket extension bar with a socket large enough to fit over the ring end of the spanner - apply lots of extra leverage and encouraging language to taste. This worked on a recalcitrant pedal on my partner's latest aquisition.
Long socket extension bar = recently acquired length of scaffolding pole!
 
OP
nmfeb70

nmfeb70

Active Member
Location
Tonypandy, Wales
Are you using a proper pedal spanner? These tend to be really chunky and long and fit the pedal nuts really well. You can deliver a good deal of force with one of these.
Yes
Are you using a proper pedal spanner? These tend to be really chunky and long and fit the pedal nuts really well. You can deliver a good deal of force with one of these.
'
I'm using a cone/pedal wrench.
 

rrarider

Über Member
Location
Liverpool
A cone spanner will literally fail. Those pedals look as if they have good flats on them. Point the crank the rear, fit (as @Sharky has said, a "proper" pedal spanner again pointing to the rear (same orientation both sides), get a helper to make sure the spanner stays engaged, and hit the end (down) hard with a hammer. Shock action.
Those flats on the pedal, do indeed, look wide enough to take a standard 15mm open-ended spanner, available for about £3. I wouldn't waste my money (£12 !) on that linked Park Tools object which looks like it might be about 1mm thick
 

figbat

Slippery scientist
A cone spanner will literally fail. Those pedals look as if they have good flats on them. Point the crank the rear, fit (as @Sharky has said, a "proper" pedal spanner again pointing to the rear (same orientation both sides), get a helper to make sure the spanner stays engaged, and hit the end (down) hard with a hammer. Shock action.
Agreed, although I would also put something solid under the crank arm to make sure the shock stays in the pedal and isn't simply spilled away down the crank and through the drivetrain.
 

Mr Celine

Discordian
Location
Not Ingolstadt
As others have said looks like you could get a proper width 15mm spanner on that. Position the crank pointing downwards so that the spanner is pointing to the rear. Sit on the bike leaning against a suitable wall, keep your front brake on hard. Position your left foot gently on the spanner. (This takes practice to avoid the spanner falling off. An assistant may help).

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You are Steve McQueen. Start that motorcycle. ^_^
 
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