Sims 2 on Windows 7 problem

Stemming from my earlier post about needing to find a full version of XP...

One of the games that's giving me trouble under Win 7 is Sims 2. Anyone got this working without having to revert to using a full version of XP and dual booting? Under Win 7, it reports that it can't find a Directx 9.0 compatible graphics adapter, which makes no sense as the computer is effectively brand new with very good graphics and a newer version of Directx installed. Have also tried the MS tool that looks at your current Directx and installs any missing elements, but the error message persists.
 
Windows 7 comes with a slightly cut down version of directx as default.
Google 'DirectX 9c redist' and install one of those for the full set.
If that still doesn't work, try running Sims in Compatibility mode. Right click the icon, select 'properties', choose the tab named 'compatibility' and select 'XP service pack 3'
 
2Loose said:
Windows 7 comes with a slightly cut down version of directx as default.
Google 'DirectX 9c redist' and install one of those for the full set.
If that still doesn't work, try running Sims in Compatibility mode. Right click the icon, select 'properties', choose the tab named 'compatibility' and select 'XP service pack 3'
I believe that Win 7 Home Premium doesn't have this compatibility mode available though... :biggrin:
 
beanzontoast said:
I believe that Win 7 Home Premium doesn't have this compatibility mode available though... :biggrin:
I think you mean that Home Premium doesn't have 'XP Mode' which is something else altogether. Try it and see, although I would put my money on the full DirectX being needed anyway.

*quote*
Most applications that were designed for Windows 2000 or Windows XP will still function correctly under all editions of Windows 7, including Home Premium. Some applications check the version number of the operating system and will fail to run if it finds an unexpected version number, therefore Windows 7 has a compatibility mode which allows these types of programs to run correctly.

There is also another compatibility option geared towards IT professionals and business users which is called "Windows XP Mode," which is essentially a fully-licensed copy of Windows XP Professional running inside of a virtual machine and is only available to Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Enterprise, and Windows 7 Ultimate users.

Windows XP Mode is meant primarily for companies who have designed their own software in-house which is targeted specifically for a version of software - a prime example of this is a web application that only works in Internet Explorer 6 (which is available with Windows XP, but not with Windows 7).
*unquote*
 
2Loose said:
I think you mean that Home Premium doesn't have 'XP Mode' which is something else altogether. Try it and see, although I would put my money on the full DirectX being needed anyway.

*quote*
Most applications that were designed for Windows 2000 or Windows XP will still function correctly under all editions of Windows 7, including Home Premium. Some applications check the version number of the operating system and will fail to run if it finds an unexpected version number, therefore Windows 7 has a compatibility mode which allows these types of programs to run correctly.

There is also another compatibility option geared towards IT professionals and business users which is called "Windows XP Mode," which is essentially a fully-licensed copy of Windows XP Professional running inside of a virtual machine and is only available to Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Enterprise, and Windows 7 Ultimate users.

Windows XP Mode is meant primarily for companies who have designed their own software in-house which is targeted specifically for a version of software - a prime example of this is a web application that only works in Internet Explorer 6 (which is available with Windows XP, but not with Windows 7).
*unquote*
Ah - I see. Will look into this, thanks. :biggrin:
 
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