Slipping after chain replacement

Shearwater Missile

Über Member
Location
Heart of Suffolk
I replaced the chain on my 9 speed Sora after 2500 miles and get the occasional slip on the middle sprocket, by that I mean about half a dozen times in 24 miles. It is not always under load conditions. It did not do it before the chain change and was changed because of wear and no other problems. The cassette has done slightly less than the chain. The way I see it is that I have three options :
1, Buy a new cassette
2, Refit the old chain and then replace together
3, Wait and see what happens
I have read somewhere that the slipping might settle down after a while. I`d just like to know what you guys think or would do. Thanking you in anticipation.
 

Gravity Aided

Legendary Member
Location
Land of Lincoln
Check the middle sprocket for "shark toothing," wear on the teeth. I assume you use the middle sprocket the most, so that may be all that needs replacement.
1576149994070.png
This is from a dirt bike website, but results look similar for pedal bikes.
1576150188639.png
This is an example from a tadpole trike website. I would think this extreme wear.
 
Last edited:

overmind

My other bike is a Pinarello
Is the following a possible fourth option?

4. Rotate the middle sprocket by 1/3 of a revolution (120 degrees)
(if this worked then logically you could do this twice)

I noticed once that I had bad wear on one particular tooth which corresponded to when the pressure was applied on the front chainset. If I removed the ring and put in back in a different position (120 degrees around) this tooth would not be in the location of the maximum pressure.
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
You could probably follow all three of your suggestions, but for me, time is precious and spending an hour or so fettling on the bikes is a scarce commodity. I would buy a new cassette as soon as possible and fit that, then you know your chain and cassette should be perfect.

Just to add, I hate changing chains and cassettes going into the winter as dirt and weather takes a toil, but if you are having problems, you need to change something.

Good luck
 
OP
Shearwater Missile

Shearwater Missile

Über Member
Location
Heart of Suffolk
You could probably follow all three of your suggestions, but for me, time is precious and spending an hour or so fettling on the bikes is a scarce commodity. I would buy a new cassette as soon as possible and fit that, then you know your chain and cassette should be perfect.

Just to add, I hate changing chains and cassettes going into the winter as dirt and weather takes a toil, but if you are having problems, you need to change something.

Good luck
i think that changing the chain back is a no no really so will look into the cassette option. The roads have been taking their toll.
 
Location
Loch side.
I replaced the chain on my 9 speed Sora after 2500 miles and get the occasional slip on the middle sprocket, by that I mean about half a dozen times in 24 miles. It is not always under load conditions. It did not do it before the chain change and was changed because of wear and no other problems. The cassette has done slightly less than the chain. The way I see it is that I have three options :
1, Buy a new cassette
2, Refit the old chain and then replace together
3, Wait and see what happens
I have read somewhere that the slipping might settle down after a while. I`d just like to know what you guys think or would do. Thanking you in anticipation.
Wait a bit and see if it settles in.
An used, worn cassette CANNOT mess up a new chain.
Brand new chains are slightly shorter than their perfect working length. This is due to slight misalignment in the pins from the manufacturing process. Within a 100kms or so it gets to its nominal working length and then it will again mesh with that slightly worn sprocket.
Many people don't wait it out and throw away a perfectly good cassette.
 

fossyant

Ride It Like You Stole It!
Location
South Manchester
You could probably follow all three of your suggestions, but for me, time is precious and spending an hour or so fettling on the bikes is a scarce commodity.
Dear Moderators, this person needs removing from the forum. :whistle: Either this or we need a 'go fund me' to get him a man cave. If Sharky has a man cave, then needs a perma-ban. 👅

OP Ride faster, and don't use the sprocket :laugh:
 
Last edited:
OP
Shearwater Missile

Shearwater Missile

Über Member
Location
Heart of Suffolk
Wait a bit and see if it settles in.
An used, worn cassette CANNOT mess up a new chain.
Brand new chains are slightly shorter than their perfect working length. This is due to slight misalignment in the pins from the manufacturing process. Within a 100kms or so it gets to its nominal working length and then it will again mesh with that slightly worn sprocket.
Many people don't wait it out and throw away a perfectly good cassette.
You may be right. When I changed the chain last time it was only after 2200 miles and i then had to replace the cassette as that skipped quite a lot. I always use KMC chains and have used Sram cassettes and clean both after rides in the wet. Sometimes you wonder if it is worth the cleaning but I like to. Reading some people get 2-3 chains to a cassette seems a like a dream to me, I wish. I`ll give it a hundred miles to see if it settles in as you say.
 

Sharky

Guru
Location
Kent
Dear Moderators, this person needs removing from the forum. :whistle: Either this or we need a 'go fund me' to get him a man cave. If Sharky has a man cave, then needs a perma-ban. 👅

OP you need a new cassette.
That's a good idea. My OH is putting pressure on me to get a new bike shed/workshed in the garden, so we can convert the garage into another room.

www.givemeloads.co.uk
 

overmind

My other bike is a Pinarello
Wait a bit and see if it settles in.
An used, worn cassette CANNOT mess up a new chain.
Brand new chains are slightly shorter than their perfect working length. This is due to slight misalignment in the pins from the manufacturing process. Within a 100kms or so it gets to its nominal working length and then it will again mesh with that slightly worn sprocket.
Many people don't wait it out and throw away a perfectly good cassette.
That is useful advice. I did not know that, thanks. :-)

I had an old cassette where I had problems with a new chain. The cassette was not very worn and I bought a new cassette at the time (but I kept the old cassette). This new cassette is well worn now and I have decided I am going to wear it into the dust and then replace both chain and cassette.

When I do I will switch back to the old cassette (which was not that worn above) with a new chain and see if the 100kms rule above works for me.
 

Ajax Bay

Veteran
Location
East Devon
I'd replace the old chain (clean, lightly oil, wipe, and store the 'new' one), and run that chain and cassette together till you get slipping (quite possibly will give you another 1000+ miles). Then replace the cassette and refit the chain you've just fitted.
the chain . . . was changed because of wear and no other problems
ETA: The chain wasn't slipping. It's because you let wear so much (2500 miles) it would have been well beyond 1% and the cassette had/has worn to match. If you just put up with the slipping and see, I hope it works for you after a few hundred miles. Personally I would not find that acceptable (for that many miles of riding enjoyment).
 
Last edited:

roubaixtuesday

Veteran
Photo Winner
I've had this before and agree with the views above it will probably settle in quickly.

But next time you'll certainly have to replace both together.
 

Smokin Joe

Legendary Member
Is the following a possible fourth option?

4. Rotate the middle sprocket by 1/3 of a revolution (120 degrees)
(if this worked then logically you could do this twice)

I noticed once that I had bad wear on one particular tooth which corresponded to when the pressure was applied on the front chainset. If I removed the ring and put in back in a different position (120 degrees around) this tooth would not be in the location of the maximum pressure.
You can't do that with a cassette sprocket. They only fit in one position.
 
Top Bottom