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SRAM PowerLink chain connector - any good for fixed?

Discussion in 'Fixed Gear and Single Speed' started by e-rider, 30 Mar 2008.

  1. e-rider

    e-rider crappy member

    Location:
    South West
    Hi,
    I've got a 3/32" SRAM chain that comes with a special PowerLink chain connector. I know that they work well with gears but has anyone tried one fixed? Any danger of it coming undone? Cheers.
     
  2. Smokin Joe

    Smokin Joe Legendary Member

    The trouble with using one on a fixed wheel is that when you put back pressure on the pedals the link is likely to come undone. I would stck to using a chain tool myself.
     
  3. rustychisel

    rustychisel Well-Known Member

    hmmm, explain the physics underlying that assumption. Surely the maintained tension is merely in the other direction, saving that instant when you stop pedalling forward and apply backward pressure? And they sure don't come undone that easily.

    In the event, I have used them numerous times on numerous chains, including on a track bike, and have never found a problem. I'm also a bit fastidious, examine my bikes carefully, fairly often, and I'm not a masher though I can put a pretty powerful sprint together.

    Bottom line, if it concerns you, don't use one. If you're happy with one on your geared bike...
     
  4. feckless

    feckless Über Member

    Location:
    Not all that close
    I can't see why a powerlink would be a problem. I have one on my fixed bike and weekend crashes notwithstanding, it seems to be okay.

    f
     
  5. Ravenbait

    Ravenbait Someone's imaginary friend

    Wouldn't trust one on mine.

    But that's irrational gut instinct, nothing to do with physics.

    Sam
     
  6. Zoiders

    Zoiders New Member

    Location:
    Ice Station Zebra
    If that were correct there would only be one direction of fitting on a powerlink, if you got it the wrong way round it would come undone, this is not the case though

    Go away and come back to us when you have rethought your physics young man!
     
  7. Smokin Joe

    Smokin Joe Legendary Member

    Surely though when you put back pressure on the pedals you are putting a compression force along the links on the top run of the chain, which is what you do to release a quicklink?
     
  8. rustychisel

    rustychisel Well-Known Member

    nup, chain will sag, momentarily.
     
  9. Twenty Inch

    Twenty Inch New Member

    Location:
    Behind a desk
    Difficult to compress a chain, Joe.
     
  10. It will be fine I use the powerlink on my fixie and very handy if your like me and are striping the bike every 5 mins or so for a good cleaning.


    And Twenty Inch is it difficult to compress a chain? I dont think so on a freewheeled bike maybe but on a fixed there is no play in the chain. So if you are moving forword on the bike and you push back hard you will be compressing the chain untill the wheel is moving in the same derection. That is why the life of a chain on a fixed bike is less then on a freewheeled bike If both do the same miles.
     
  11. Twenty Inch

    Twenty Inch New Member

    Location:
    Behind a desk
    It's what Rusty said. If you have a solid bar and press on both ends, it will get thicker. A chain's components will move in relation to each other, but not compress so that a powerlink will come off.
     
  12. PrettyboyTim

    PrettyboyTim New Member

    Location:
    Brighton
    When you're pedalling forwards, the chain running along the top is in tension, and the lower section will be less so. When you pedal backwards or try to slow or stop the rear wheel, the chain section along the bottom of the loop will be in tension, with the upper section less so. At no point will either section of the chain be in compression.
     
  13. Jacomus-rides-Gen

    Jacomus-rides-Gen New Member

    Location:
    Guildford / London
    Also no-one has mentioned that in order to release a powerlink you need to squeeze the plates together before pushing the links together. So unless you can do that whilst putting backpressure through the chain, it will not come undone.

    Also, when applying back pressure, the top run goes slack and the bottom takes the strain, if powerlinks came undone every time the chain went slack, you would split the chain every time it reach the bottom run when predalling normally.