Sun Dome/Sun Pipes....anyone had one fitted?

Dave7

Legendary Member
Location
Cheshire
Our stairway is quite dark. We debated having a window fitted last time we decorated but it was too much mither.
Sun pipes have improved such a lot so we have decided to get one fitted.
Lots of companies claiming theirs are the best.
Accrylic domes claim to be more efficient than polycarb and don't yellow with age.
Anyone had it done and have any advice to pass on? Best make etc?
The actual fitting will be straight forward as where it is going is at a low point on the roof and the ceiling would be only approx 2 mtrs below in a straight line.
 

sheddy

Guru
Location
Suffolk
Can’t help but check if the major players have a showroom/demo site.
 
Location
Loch side.
The amount of light increases by the square of the radius of the pipe. Double the radius, and the amount of light that passes through is 4 x more. Triple it and it is 9 times more.

Therefore, the biggest is the best, by far. However, compare the size of a pipe to a window, and it is still dismal.

Further, a window brings light in that can bounce off the walls and lighten the room. A sun dome usually shines from top to bottom and reflects less around the space, especially if the floor is dark.

Any improvement by sun pipe companies are restricted by the square rule and no amount of marketing hype will change the ratio of size vs light.

To put it in non-mathematical terms, the difference is minimal, because it is almost impossible to get a hole the size of a reasonable window. Nevertheless, in a tunnel, even a burning match helps.
 
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Levo-Lon

Guru
The short answer is yes they work very well.
Cost may be prohibitive depending on what's required

Get 3 quotes from local independent trades
 

ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
The amount of light increases by the square of the area of the pipe. Double the area, and the amount of light that passes through is 4 x more. Triple it and it is 9 times more.
I'm not saying that you are wrong, but did you really mean 'area' or did you mean 'diameter'? I can see why the amount of light getting in might be related to the square of the diameter since the area of the opening is. If it is the square of the area then it is proportional to the 4th power of the diameter, which sounds surprising!
 
Location
Loch side.
I'm not saying that you are wrong, but did you really mean 'area' or did you mean 'diameter'? I can see why the amount of light getting in might be related to the square of the diameter since the area of the opening is. If it is the square of the area then it is proportional to the 4th power of the diameter, which sounds surprising!

I am wrong. It should read radius. I'll edit my post. Thanks.
 
OP
Dave7

Dave7

Legendary Member
Location
Cheshire
The short answer is yes they work very well.
Cost may be prohibitive depending on what's required

Get 3 quotes from local independent trades
When I worked in the roofing materials industry these were new and 'sounded' good. The stats I read on the new generation are excellent (if I can believe them). £250 upwards plus fitting it appears
 
OP
Dave7

Dave7

Legendary Member
Location
Cheshire
I'm not saying that you are wrong, but did you really mean 'area' or did you mean 'diameter'? I can see why the amount of light getting in might be related to the square of the diameter since the area of the opening is. If it is the square of the area then it is proportional to the 4th power of the diameter, which sounds surprising!
Oohh my head hurts:wacko:.
I must say, in all honestly, we have some varied and smart people on cycle chat.
Thats a genuine compliment to many members.
 

ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
Oohh my head hurts:wacko:.
I must say, in all honestly, we have some varied and smart people on cycle chat.
Thats a genuine compliment to many members.
Ha ha. I am checking the forum while I take a break from the puzzle game I am working on which is based on an inverse square law... I have shown the prototype to a few people and their eyes tend to glaze over. One friend was trying awfully hard to be nice when I asked for her opinion...

"So, Col, do you, er, do you honestly think that there is... much of a market for that kind of thing?" :whistle:

:laugh:

As for light pipes... My sister had one put in her kitchen extension, which wasn't really ideal for a roof window. The pipe does seem to let a significant amount of light in. I used to think that the kitchen was a bit gloomy and it hasn't seemed on my subsequent visits.
 
Location
Loch side.
Ha ha. I am checking the forum while I take a break from the puzzle game I am working on which is based on an inverse square law... I have shown the prototype to a few people and their eyes tend to glaze over. One friend was trying awfully hard to be nice when I asked for her opinion...

"So, Col, do you, er, do you honestly think that there is... much of a market for that kind of thing?" :whistle:

:laugh:

As for light pipes... My sister had one put in her kitchen extension, which wasn't really ideal for a roof window. The pipe does seem to let a significant amount of light in. I used to think that the kitchen was a bit gloomy and it hasn't seemed on my subsequent visits.
I'll now have to buy one, won't I?
 

Levo-Lon

Guru
When I worked in the roofing materials industry these were new and 'sounded' good. The stats I read on the new generation are excellent (if I can believe them). £250 upwards plus fitting it appears
Its the fitting that throws the spanner in..
Sometimes its very easy and a lot requires scaffold and a fair bit of internal work.

Brilliant for bungalows :smile:
 
OP
Dave7

Dave7

Legendary Member
Location
Cheshire
Its the fitting that throws the spanner in..
Sometimes its very easy and a lot requires scaffold and a fair bit of internal work.

Brilliant for bungalows :smile:
My Mr Fixit thinks it will be simple. We have a low level extension so a short ladder will get him onto the top roof and he will be fitting it only about 2 mtrs(ish) higher.
 
OP
Dave7

Dave7

Legendary Member
Location
Cheshire
Ha ha. I am checking the forum while I take a break from the puzzle game I am working on which is based on an inverse square law... I have shown the prototype to a few people and their eyes tend to glaze over. One friend was trying awfully hard to be nice when I asked for her opinion...

"So, Col, do you, er, do you honestly think that there is... much of a market for that kind of thing?" :whistle:

:laugh:

As for light pipes... My sister had one put in her kitchen extension, which wasn't really ideal for a roof window. The pipe does seem to let a significant amount of light in. I used to think that the kitchen was a bit gloomy and it hasn't seemed on my subsequent visits.
Do you know if the roof bit was a dome or flat panel?
The dome people claim they are more efficient and to me the principle 'sounds/looks' right.
 

MontyVeda

a short-tempered ill-controlled small-minded troll
My dad was looking at them about 10 years ago to brighten up the gloomy kitchen of their bungalow. He figured they we're too expensive for what they were... so he got a small Velux window fitted in the loft and instructed one of his children (me) to cut a big rectangular hole in the kitchen ceiling and box off the area between the Velux and the hole with plaster board.

For my rudimentary DIY skills, it seemed like a very daunting task, but was easy enough once i got going. The trapezium shaped shaft looks really smart. The amount of light is somewhere between more than adequate and amazing. Far far better than a piddly little light well would have been. All credit goes to my Dad... he had some brilliant ideas :notworthy:
 
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