The horrible feeling of bonking

johnnyb47

Veteran
Location
Wales
Hi.
Tonight's ride didn't go to well.
It was my own stupid fault really for not eating properly. Ive been at work since 5 this morning and had only eaten a small bowl of pasta this morning followed by some porridge for lunch. Once home this afternoon i didn't feel to hungry so skipped tea and went for a longish bike ride which included some long climbs over the welsh mountains A fellow cyclist can flying past me and "as you do" i tried keeping up, but he was in a completely different league to me and watched him fade away into the sun set.
By the time i got near home i could really feel my energy levels drop, to point i was feeling shakey and lightheaded. I think this was the first symptoms of bonking and if i would of gone much further it would of got much worse.
A lesson learnt today. Eat regularly and don't skip meals before you plan a long ride.
 

YukonBoy

The Monch
Location
Inside my skull
Take bonk rations on your ride then it'll never be a prob
 
OP
johnnyb47

johnnyb47

Veteran
Location
Wales
Your right there buddy. As the cycling seems to be intensifying, i need to pay more attention to keeping my self fueled up
 

si_c

Veteran
Location
Wirral
I used to have issues as a teenager and through my early twenties as regards not eating enough and then feeling very lightheaded and nauseous. Consequently I've never bonked on a ride nor really come close, I know that when I start to lose energy that I need to stop and fuel long in advance of actually bonking. It's worth learning what those early warning signs are for you so that you can ensure that you don't get close to being desperately in need of some food.

I've found that I respond quite well to sugar or sugar like food on the bike, but equally I need to eat properly so on a long ride if I haven't planned food stops then I take sandwiches with me. Otherwise I take the opportunity as I pass shops to pick up something more substantial, sausage rolls are always a good choice.

Edit: just to add, if out for less than an hour then don't worry about fuelling it won't digest in time, but think about what you want to eat after. For longer rides of two hours or more, I try to eat something every half hour or so with a quick stop every three hours for something more. But again, you need to figure out what works for you, so experiment.
 

raleighnut

Legendary Member
Location
On 3 Wheels
I used to have issues as a teenager and through my early twenties as regards not eating enough and then feeling very lightheaded and nauseous. Consequently I've never bonked on a ride nor really come close, I know that when I start to lose energy that I need to stop and fuel long in advance of actually bonking. It's worth learning what those early warning signs are for you so that you can ensure that you don't get close to being desperately in need of some food.

I've found that I respond quite well to sugar or sugar like food on the bike, but equally I need to eat properly so on a long ride if I haven't planned food stops then I take sandwiches with me. Otherwise I take the opportunity as I pass shops to pick up something more substantial, sausage rolls are always a good choice.

Edit: just to add, if out for less than an hour then don't worry about fuelling it won't digest in time, but think about what you want to eat after. For longer rides of two hours or more, I try to eat something every half hour or so with a quick stop every three hours for something more. But again, you need to figure out what works for you, so experiment.
Sausage rolls are good, Pork Pies are better but I've heard that Pork Scratchings are even better. Just remember you need an Isotonic drink as well, a couple of pints should do it. :cheers:
 

Globalti

Legendary Member
Overall strength and fitness matter. When I bought my first mountain bike on impulse in 1987 and rode it home thinking I was fit, I bonked within five miles of leaving the shop.

As I was plodding along, feeling terrible and wondering what was wrong with me a neighbour passed in her camper. I would have accepted a lift but she didn't stop. When I saw her later she said: "I thought you looked tired but didn't think you'd want to accept a lift so I carried on!"
 
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ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
If you haven't been overtaken by a jogger, 5 miles from home - you haven't bonked.
From my story about my first episode...

ColinJ said:
I was riding so slowly that I was overtaken by an elderly woman pedestrian. I must have looked very odd, a big salt-encrusted man clad in lycra weaving across the road on a bicycle. She kept glancing anxiously over her shoulder at me as she scuttled off down the street.
:laugh:
 

cyberknight

As long as I breathe, I attack.
If still riding at a reasonable speed then you haven't bonked yet, but it sounds like you were heading there! :okay:
I had similar last year on a sportive,got into a fast group and blasted around till the last 15 miles when my on the flat speed dropped to about 15 and i couldnt even stand up at the end.
 

ColinJ

Puzzle game developer
I had similar last year on a sportive,got into a fast group and blasted around till the last 15 miles when my on the flat speed dropped to about 15 and i couldnt even stand up at the end.
Half the time these days I am not doing 15 mph even before bonking - ha ha! :okay:

I was talking seriously slow - to the point where it is no longer possible to balance on the bike. I have ended up flat on my back in the road, unable to speak, and losing vision! :wacko:

I make damn sure that it doesn't happen again these days ... :whistle:

Mind you, I was feeling pretty close to it on the recent Bowland/Dales forum ride! (Overheating was also a factor.)

Here's me fading fast on a steep hill...

colinj-shows-how-not-to-climb-halton-moor-jpg.jpg


And having a little rest at the top!

colinj-fights-for-life-after-nightmare-ascent-of-halton-moor-jpg.jpg


:laugh:
 
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